Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Sunday, July 24
 

9:00am

Registration OPEN

Pick-up your badge and conference materials and ask any questions you may have at Agile2016 throughout the week.

Sunday - 15:00 - 19:00
Monday - Thursday - 7:00 - 18:00
Friday - 7:00 - 12:30

 



Sunday July 24, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
Centennial Foyer

3:00pm

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:

Get the most out of Agile2016 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2016, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything.


There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.


Learning Outcomes:

  • Find out how to get the most out of Agile2016






Speakers

Sunday July 24, 2016 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Centennial 1

6:00pm

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:

Get the most out of Agile2016 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2016, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything.


There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.


Learning Outcomes:

  • Find out how to get the most out of Agile2016






Speakers

Sunday July 24, 2016 6:00pm - 6:30pm
Centennial 1

6:00pm

Early Registration Meet & Greet
We invite everyone to kick off the conference week early. Join us Sunday evening from 18:00 - 19:00 for a casual get-together with other early arrivals.

The Registration Desk will open at 15:00 pm on Sunday.

Come early and miss the crowd! Pick up your badge, registration package and an additional complimentary beverage ticket.

Sunday July 24, 2016 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Centennial Foyer
 
Monday, July 25
 

8:00am

First Time Attendee Orientation
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:

Get the most out of Agile2016 by attending a First Time Attendee Orientation Session. These short half-hour sessions are designed to give you a little "101 Guide" to Agile2016, including insights into ways to get the most out of your experience. There will also be a "Q & A" session at the end in case we miss anything.


There is no pre-registration required for this, or any other session.


Learning Outcomes:

  • Find out how to get the most out of Agile2016






Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 8:00am - 8:30am
Centennial 1

8:30am

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss? Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment. We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join!

Monday July 25, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Grand Hall Foyer

9:00am

Welcoming Remarks (Brian Button)
Abstract:
Introduction to the Agile2016 conference and find out key information for making your week as successful and enjoyable as possible.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 9:00am - 9:15am
Centennial Ballroom

9:00am

Managing for Happiness (Jurgen Appelo)
Abstract:

The research is clear: happy workers are more productive workers. And it?s best when managers enjoy their jobs as well. Managing for Happiness is about concrete management advice for all workers. Practical things that people can do next Monday morning in order to change the organization?s culture, and make it a happier place to work. This is not only relevant for managers, but for everyone who is concerned about the organization. We create a happier environment by managing ourselves, and lead by example, in an environment focused on experiments and learning. All creative workers are expected to be ?servant leaders? and ?systems thinkers?. In this session, you will learn how you can do that concretely, with a number of inspiring stories and examples. A happier organization starts with people managing themselves.

The book Managing for Happiness will be released worldwide by John Wiley & Sons in June 2016 in full colors.


Managing-for-Happiness-37-Agile2016.pdf





Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Centennial Ballroom

10:45am

Dynamic reteaming: how we thrived by rebuilding teams (Heidi Helfand)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Who says you need "stable" teams in order to build a successful software company? While the addition or removal of one person from a team means you have a "new team", there is a myth out there about "stable" teams. When your team compositions change it doesn't mean you're doing it "wrong" - it's just a different way of working. We've thrived through dynamic reteaming - the act of moving team members around teams in different ways. Even with changeable teams we still deliver value weekly to our customers. For the past 9 years, from startup to public company, we've learned a lot about reteaming. In this talk I'll share the what, why and how about reteaming with you.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • When one new person joins or leaves a team, you have a new team.
  • It's valid and not an anti-pattern to have your teams change.
  • The rate of team change can be tuned like a volume control.
  • Changing teams can be "perfectly normal". So can moving from desk to desk.
  • The coach's role is to deliberately help the team gel and get up to speed as quickly as possible.
  • Understanding change theory is helpful to teach when you team and reteam.
  • If you know and care about the people you work with, everything else comes easier.
  • Focusing on the fulfillment of team members often initiates changes in teams.
  • Feedback loops at the person level, individual team level, multiple team level, and organizational level supports reteaming.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Helfand

Heidi Helfand

Principal Agile Coach, Independent
Heidi Helfand is an independent consultant who has spent the last 17 years coaching and influencing cross-functional teams at pioneering web software companies. At Expertcity, Inc. (acquired by CitrixOnline) she was on the initial team that built GoToMyPC, GoToMeeting and GoToWebinar, the products which have made Citrix Online one of the largest SAAS companies in the world. She was Principal Agile Coach at AppFolio, Inc., a SAAS workflow software... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
Kennesaw

10:45am

Introduction to Agile: The Genesis (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
What is this thing everyone calls Agile? If you have been doing software development a different way your whole career you may be wondering why should I change, what’s so different? In this introductory talk we will define why Agile is more than a process or methodology; it really involves changing your culture to improve your software development. To provide some additional context we’ll also:
  • Look back at how the Agile methods and practices emerged
  • Discuss the Agile Manifesto and 12 Principles and their resulting impact on the way that we do software development today
  • Describe what it’s like to work on Agile Project
  • Describe what you can do next Monday to get started
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn common myths and misconceptions of agile
  • Understand the why behind what we do
  • Understand the importance of identifying your existing culture and how it impacts adopting agile
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover AB

10:45am

Distributed Agile: Evolution or Delusion? - Première Partie (Mark Kilby)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
For years, we've heard "agile is for collocated teams. Don't do agile if you can't all be together. Without close daily interactions, agile cannot work.” Or, can it? With changes in technology and broader agile adoption, we are seeing organizations of dispersed teams where agile not only works, but thrives. But does it work the same way as when everyone is together? Can we truly be agile and be spread over time zones and locations?
Here are some of the challenges to explore: - What are the limitations and downsides of distributed Agile, and what tools and ways of working can address those? What are the advantages? How can we set things up to maximize the advantages and minimize the limitations?
  • Does a distributed agile approach encourage non-optimal structures...or can it help create new effective organizations ?
  • Are we asking professionals to adapt too quickly with new collaborative behaviors AND remote dynamics … or does learning the former overcome the latter?
  • How are cultural and language barriers impacted by both face-to-face work (e.g., offensive body language) or remote work (e.g., removing human touch). Or can one kind of work help avoid the challenges of the other?
  • Can working asynchronously and remote actually help some type of work and certain types of workers? Is this a new area for the introverts to thrive? What compromises are they not seeing, and what evolutions are we not seeing?
Help us discover how distributed agile is an obstacle to overcome and a new way of working. Join us in this Audacious Salon.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

Agile Coach, Sonatype
Since 1990, Mark Kilby has guided individuals, teams and organizations to develop unique software and system solutions for government, industry and academia. His roles have included software developer, technical lead, rocket scientist, principal investigator, technical architect, web development manager, methodologist, scrum master, product owner and agile coach (since 2003). His experience spans complete software development life cycles for a... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Spring

10:45am

Coaching Nightmares: Insights we can Learn from Gordon Ramsay (Craig Smith)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
When you look for inspiration in the Agile Coaching community, the name Gordon Ramsay is probably not the first name to come to mind. He has been known to be belligerent, condescending and downright rude, but underneath this brute facade is a treasure trove of skills and talents that influence change.
In this presentation we will draw insights from his ‘Kitchen Nightmare’ escapades and draw parallels with how much his work aligns with that of an Agile Coach and the goal to successfully drive change and introduce a number of models and techniques that are indispensable in the coaching toolkit.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the difference between coaching, advising and mentoring
  • Approaches to having confronting coaching conversations
  • Dealing with denial and unengaged staff
  • The criticality of a burning platform to invoke change
  • Why it is important to have coaches as experts
  • Agile coaching is more than the GROW model (or other coaching models)
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Craig Smith

Craig Smith

Agile Coach & Director, Unbound DNA
Craig Smith has been an Agile Practitioner, Coach and one of Australia’s premier Agile Trainers for over ten years. As a co-organiser of the Agile Brisbane Meetup Group, advisor of Agile Australia, co-chair of one of the world’s leading Agile Podcasts and an Agile Editor for InfoQ, Craig is one of Australia’s heaviest contributors to the Agile community. Craig has presented at numerous conferences including Agile 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency VI

10:45am

Finding Agreement When Everyone Is Right (Michael Tardiff)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are you a good agree-er? Do others agree with you often? Do you know how to make agreement spread?
Have you ever tried to have lunch with a group of five or more coworkers and had trouble agreeing on where to go? Or come to the end of a sprint and been unable to agree on which of the many things the team could do to experiment or change the team will do? Maybe the folks ordering your backlog can’t agree which of the twenty-five number-one priorities is the real number one.
Agreement is at the heart of agility and lean practice, yet we often have trouble finding it. Drawing on decades of experience helping people agree” and collaborative governance methods, this practical and interactive discussion explores what it means to be “right” and how we can help ourselves and those with whom we work find agreement on matters small and large.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What it means to find agreement
  • Why making decisions is hard or impossible when everyone is certain and different.
  • The four ways of making decisions and finding agreement
  • What’s the best way for us to find agreement
  • Experience through exercises on how agreement is both easier and harder to find than we may think
  • A renewed belief that agreement starts with you
  • Tools for helping you find common ground with your colleagues
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover DE

10:45am

From Kickoff to Liftoff: Don’t Forget Context! (Ellen Grove, Steve Holyer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Although a good Agile Charter has three components – Purpose, Alignment, and Context – we often fail at building an awareness of context in our teams. Perhaps it's because we've taken the time to teach Product Owners a little bit about purpose, and Scrum Masters a little bit about alignment, and then we threw out all the Project Managers who understand context. (Ok, we're kidding about that. Don't throw out your Project Managers!)
Your team needs to understand their context so that they recognize that they are one part of a complex adaptive system. Contextual awareness helps the team to make better product decisions as they will understand how their work fits into the greater whole.
In this hands-on workshop we'll give you three concrete tools you can take home and use with your team to facilitate awareness of their context. You will use these tools to:
  • understand team boundaries and interactions with stakeholders and product partners
  • identify dependencies
  • identify opportunities, risks, and benefits through prospective analysis
Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe the importance of chartering context to support systems thinking in the project community
  • Facilitate team discussions around boundaries and interactions, dependencies, and risks and opportunities
  • Create lightweight documentation to capture context elements within an Agile charter
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Grove

Ellen Grove

Agile Partnership
business agility coach, software tester, Open Space facilitator, LEGO junkie, and organizational instigator
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Principle Consultant (and Indie-label Coach), Engage-Results.com
Steve Holyer is an experienced trainer, coach, facilitator and consultant helping organisations unleash value and produce results. He is also a frequent international speaker on Scrum and Agile software development. He serves as advocate and mentor for companies, leaders and change agents looking for a better way of working using Agile practices in a productive, fulfilling, and fun way. | | From international Swiss business to emerging... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency VII

10:45am

Learning from Bad Examples - Readability and Python (Bryan Beecham, Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Come and see some horrible examples of software code. Don't worry, we won't stop there. We'll show improved versions of the same code. We'll also show you some simple ways to get code from a mess to the readable and updatable code.
There will be loops and variables all over the screen so if you're into that then this is the session for you.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to refactor to readability
  • How to make small improvements
  • Benefits of pair programming


Speakers
avatar for Bryan Beecham

Bryan Beecham

Agile Coach and Trainer, Industrial Logic
Bryan is an international speaker, coach, trainer, and agile consultant. His passion is to help improve companies, teams and individuals through continuous improvement and increasing awareness.
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Lenox

10:45am

Building the Business Case for DevOps (Kathryn Kuhn, Christine Hudson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As agile teams, we’re all too familiar with having our production-ready code sit in long queues, filling out onerous forms and generally waiting what feels like forever to get our code into production. IT operations teams, on the other hand, often feel stuck supporting brittle software. We know that the processes and values behind the DevOps movement hold a lot of promise to address both sets of concerns. But how do you get there? And how do you convince key stakeholders and executives, who work across deep silos in your company (business, IT, operations), to give some of these practices a try?
The first step? Strike the word “DevOps” from your vocabulary. You need to break the problem space down and address meaningful areas, like taking friction out of the deployment process and democratizing operational data.
And the real secret? Build a lightweight business case that appeals to all your stakeholders in terms that they value. Make sure your business case includes a controlled and deliberate investment strategy—proactively identifying the outcomes gained by DevOps—that stakeholders can easily correlate to metrics that matter to your business. Then, watch the momentum build as you start delivering even the very first items.
In this talk, we’ll share how we use classic portfolio management techniques—such as lightweight business-model templates, cost-of-delay estimates and portfolio-investment strategies—to tie actions to outcomes and help you build your own case to change how development, testing and operations can work better together.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify several techniques for getting Business Sponsors to buy-in to DevOps initiatives
  • Appreciate the basic elements that need to go into your DevOps Business Case to appeal to multiple stakeholders
  • Understand basic principles of Cost of Delay and how it applies to DevOps
  • Become familiar with common pitfalls when trying to “sell” DevOps
  • Success factors likely to enable success with DevOps.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Christine Hudson

Christine Hudson

Technology Alliances Manager, Rally Software
avatar for Kathryn Kuhn

Kathryn Kuhn

Director of Services - West Region, Ca Technologies/Rally Software
@kathryn_e_kuhn Kathryn is a Director of Agile Services and Transformation Consultant with Rally (now CA Technologies). Kathryn began her career at Accenture in Washington DC, has done service work in Guatemala, moved her family to Singapore and now calls the San Francisco Bay Area home. She’s been practicing Agile techniques in its various forms for about 12 years in large and small companies. She holds several Agile certifications including... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Baker

10:45am

Making Infrastructure as Awesome as Agile Software (Markus Silpala)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Awesome agile development teams have known for years what TDD and collaboration can do for their performance and their quality of life. The DevOps movement and its tooling can bring that to infrastructure teams as well.

I have observed an interesting pattern on several recent software teams that strove to adopt infrastructure automation: after a brief honeymoon period, ~90% of the developers came to dislike much of the tooling around infrastructure deployment and the activities around managing it. They wanted to offload that work to a different team so that they wouldn’t have to deal with it at all—in effect, requesting a new silo to separate themselves from a class of work and responsibility(!).
At first I was surprised. Why this distaste for tools and practices that actually gave them greater feedback on and influence over the runtime quality of their apps? It turns out—unsurprisingly—that there are some serious differences between the state of the art in app-level tooling and the much less mature world of infrastructure tooling.
As I recognized the pattern I also wondered: how do we overcome this, so that teams can take their next steps towards that greater achievement? This session aims to help.
In this interactive talk, I will share my own experiences, observations, and insights as well as inviting audience members to share theirs. Attendees should walk away with a stronger understanding of some of the particular challenges of developing infrastructure, and with an assortment on tips for how to deal with those challenges—both in tooling and in technique.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Developers without deployment automation experience will get an idea of where to begin learning, and some pointers on how to (and not to) do it.
  • Developers who have had a bad experience will get ideas on how to make it better.
  • Managers or other technical folks will get an overview-level understanding of what might be involved if they embark down the DevOps path, and how the journey might affect their developers and other technicians.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Markus Silpala

Markus Silpala

Silpala Software
Markus Silpala has been riding the Agile train since about 2004, serving as developer, then coach, and since then generally some blend of the two. He has a great passion for building great software, for building great software teams, and for continuously iterating on the steady improvement of both. | | In addition to enjoying his work, his family and his cats, Markus also delights in occupying crossroads—whether between dev and ops... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Fairlie

10:45am

Agile in name only: It's not a problem, it's a solution (Matthew Carlson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We’ve all experienced agile adoptions “in name only.” Where the vocabularies of agile were used but inspection and adaptation were hollow and ceremonialized. Where there were gaps between the rules of the framework or method and actual implementation. Dinwiddie, et. al. (2016) in “Patterns of Agile Journeys” describe an adoption anti-pattern where there are "people who say they agree and put on a face of compliance, but passive-agressively undermine the effort. Perhaps they only half-heartedly attempt a new way of working, or attempt it only when they think someone is watching." (p.22)
Organizational theories refer to this as decoupling (Meyer & Rowan,1977). It's common to consider decoupling as a problem and attack it directly. This workshop introduces a different perspective, that decoupling is actually a solution to underlying conflicts which need to be identified and managed before agile will be accepted.
The purpose of this workshop is to help you understand decoupling, identify what’s keeping the current system in place and help you find the levers that are available to help move organizations in the direction of Agile.
References:
Dinwiddie, G., DiFabio, S., Nissen, O., Valde, R., & Neumann, D. (2016). Patterns of Agile Journeys
Meyer, J. W., & Rowan, B. (1977). Institutionalized organizations: Formal structure as myth and ceremony. American journal of sociology, 340-363.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Recognize decoupling and identify it as a solution rather than a problem
  • Use the Isomorphic pressure model of institutions to identify competing sources of legitimacy
  • Apply this understanding to find levers to help move organizations in the direction of Agile
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Carlson

Matthew Carlson

Enterprise Agile Coach, Ticketfly
I am fascinated by the intersection of software development, communication, and high-performance teams. As an Agile Coach I use my knowledge and experience to help companies find practical solutions to wicked problems. | | I started my carrier as a software engineer working on projects as diverse as healthcare management, 3D CAD/CAM, integration with steel fabrication robots, and mobile communication applications on Android and iOS. I've... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover C

10:45am

The Executives Step-by-Step Guide to Leading Large-Scale Agile Transformation (Mike Cottmeyer)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
A few years ago everyone wanted to know how to convince their executives to go agile. Today's executives are asking their teams how they'll get them there. While we have made significant progress changing the hearts and minds of senior leadership, executives have a fiduciary responsibility to the performance of their organizations. They demand a greater level of assurance that what you plan to do is actually going to work. Executives are sick and tired of being told to trust the team and that everything will be okay. Better than anyone, executives see the dysfunction in their organizations. They want line of sight to how agile is going to help them make things better.
This talk is going to explore a safe, pragmatic, and repeatable formula for leading change in large organizations. The holy grail for an executive, is to tie dollars spent and activities performed, to internal improvement metrics and ultimately improved business performance. We'll start by discussing the elements of an agile transformation business case and how to identify a meaningful value proposition for change. Next we'll consider how to assess the organization and build an agile transformation strategy and roadmap that encourages an iterative and incremental approach to change. Finally we'll explore the metrics and controls that help you know if you're on the right track.
Throughout the presentation, we'll explore the change management and engagement techniques necessary to make sure you are building meaningful organizational support as you engage the enterprise. We'll discuss how to build and execute a change management strategy to keep everyone safe and informed throughout the transformation. We'll show how to sustain and improve the changes over time, ultimately creating an organizational ecosystem where business agility is part of the fundamental DNA of the company. The goal of this talk is to take the magic out of agile transformation and show you how to systematically and planfully introduce agile into your organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will leave the session with an understanding of how to build an organizational business case for agile, how to craft a transformation strategy and roadmap, how to build consensus internally for the transformation, and how to support the transformation with meaningful metrics that reinforce and support the changes.
  • Furthermore, we will go through how to structure the transformation, how to create an effective communication plan, and how to do all the necessary change management to make sure that everyone stays safe and supported through the transformation.


Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Centennial 4

10:45am

Modernizing Government: How Agencies Became Awesome Places to Work using Holacracy & Scrum (Paul Takken, Michael DeAngelo)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
"How Scrum, Lean and Holacracy are transforming Washington State Government into a high performing organization"
Corporate and governmental organizations are facing an epic challenge: How to adapt to change more rapidly and create a more attractive workplace culture.
WA Deputy CIO, Michael DeAngelo, and his team rose to this challenge in 2015 by introducing Scrum and Lean, and ultimately dissolving roles and hierarchy altogether with Holacracy in their department. A unique organizational blend was created: Holacracy, Lean and Scrum.
In 2015 en 2016, Agile outside IT consultants Joe Justice (Scrum inc./WikiSpeed), Paul Takken (Xebia/WikiSpeed) were invited by Washington State to observe and coach the Scrum teams applying Scrum, Lean, and Holacracy.
Much of what we experienced, can be interpreted to be shorter time to showing citizen facing value, increased customer involvement through citizen facing sprint reviews, and at a radical level as a radiant, passionate morale improvement focus. This was accomplished through self-organizing teams, removing bureaucracy, and organize around a strong sense of purpose so that teams could determine many of their own methods and norms, and this was enabled to a fantastically awesome degree by Holacracy. Holacracy, just like Scrum and other tools we saw them using, dissolved every barrier to radical collaboration, cross functionality, and self organization. The end? An engaged, energetic, passionate, fast moving, and responsive to change government workforce. They saw employee empowerment increase by over 30% and cycle time of decision making reduced by over 90%. Many agile methods are being experimented with and used in order to create that.
More info:
https://ocio.wa.gov/holacracy-blog
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to implement Scrum and even Holacracy in large conventional organizations.
  • How Holacracy interacts with other Agile methods like Scrum
  • What Scrum and other advanced structural agile practices such as Holacracy does with “the smell of the place”
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Takken

Paul Takken

Agile Innovation Consultant, Xebia Nederland BV
If I would tag my self for this conference it would be something like: #Great Transitions, #Extreme Manufacturing, #Holacracy & Sociocracy, #Mindset Engineering, #True Intrinsic Agility, #Coaching Coaches, # High Performing Teams, #FUN.


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Courtland

10:45am

Achieving your Vision through Servant Leadership (Rob Wisehart)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Have you done Vision Statements and wondered what it was for or how to help make it happen? Have you ever put together what you feel like is the perfect Vision statement for your group, and then have nobody from the team try to help see that Vision come to life? This session is about helping leaders create a Vision for their groups and then help their team members take a personal view of the Vision and help create that reality.
This session goes through creating an empowering Vision and using Servant Leadership techniques to help invite team members into sharing that Vision and making it their own. We will talk through various Servant Leadership ideas and philosophies and provide a potential roadmap for creating team cohesiveness through shared Vision and Goals.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Gain insights into creating an empowering Vision statement
  • Learn how to leverage the concepts of Servant Leadership to help team members buy into the Vision
  • Learn to help team members create their own Vision statements for their careers
  • Learn how to leverage the concepts of Servant Leadership to help team members achieve their Vision
  • Learn how the concepts of Servant Leadership can lead to the successful realization of your Vision
  • Learn how Servant Leadership can help leaders assist their team members in developing a successful career path
Attachments:

Speakers
RW

Rob Wisehart

Software Development Manager, Shamrock Foods
I am looking at where Agile is going, how to incorporate QA more effectively into an iterative inclusive team model, and how to work effectively in a disconnected workplace.


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency V

10:45am

I've Got a Fever, and the Only Prescription is More Feedback (John Krewson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The Second City in Chicago, an improvisational comedy club that launched the careers of comedians from Chris Farley to Steve Carrell, has delivered a successful product to audiences nightly for almost 60 years. How do they do it? By recognizing the power of feedback. Brian Eno, a pioneer in the music industry who produced albums for U2 and Coldplay, relies on a feedback generation system to ensure the best performances of the bands he works with. Likewise, the work of Eric Ries (Lean Startup) and Jim Collins (Good to Great) has uncovered a similar pattern of organizations that thrive on experimentation and learning. These companies recognize the value of feedback at all levels - from interpersonal communications to user behavior patterns - and structure their organizations to take advantage of that value. They systematically spread learning across all levels of the organization and leverage learning as a means to solve problems that other companies can't.
In this talk, John Krewson will describe what it means to be a feedback-based organization. He'll demonstrate how to recognize and generate feedback at all layers of an organization (individual, team, product, strategic) using innovative techniques drawn from the entertainment industry, and he'll walk through several practices for making that feedback actionable.
Learning Outcomes:
  • At the end of this session, attendees will understand:
  • - How a note taking system can be used as a feedback recognition tool
  • - How people-readers gather feedback through microexpressions
  • - How to generate feedback through Oblique Strategies
  • - How to make feedback actionable by developing a Growth Mindset
  • - How to embed the feedback loop in an organization's practices


Speakers
avatar for John Krewson

John Krewson

Founder, Sketch
John Krewson (@johnkrewson) is the founder of Sketch Development Services, a software development studio that provides Agile coaching, training and transformation services. John's past roles include Agile consulting for VersionOne and MasterCard. His communication skills, patience, and Agile experience blend into a unique style that is both approachable and entertaining. Since he still hasn't found a silver bullet to eliminate all the... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Centennial 1

10:45am

Creating Alignment with The Product Wall Release Planning Workshop (Alan Dayley)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Multi-team Release Planning, as it is often executed, fails to bring alignment beyond one-time, inter-team coordination. This hands-on session teaches the techniques and exercises for a Product Wall Release Planning Workshop. The Product Wall Release Planning Workshop brings together all the elements of business needs, user experience, value proposition, dependency resolution, risk mitigation and user story planning. By combining various Agile collaboration techniques in a guided sequence, your multi-team Release Planning can create alignment through learning and building together a clear path to success, from the release vision all the way to Sprint Backlogs.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the value of collaborative planning
  • Learn various techniques of planning from vision creation, personas, business model canvas, story mapping and others
  • Experience simulation of a few techniques to use in your next mult-team planning sessions
  • Learn how The Product Wall enables and sustains alignment beyond the planning event
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Alan Dayley

Alan Dayley

Senior Agile Coach, SolutionsIQ
After more than 25 years as a software engineer in embedded systems and enterprise, I found that the people side of creative work is where my passion lies. I love creating moments of unusual experiences that build until changes in thinking happen. Agile is about leveraging human capability as strengths instead of compensating for human capability as weaknesses.



Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Dunwoody

10:45am

Intro to Agile Product Management (Rich Mironov)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Product owner is a critical role for agile/scrum teams, as a key stakeholder and representative of users, customers or markets. Commercial software companies have a broader role -- product manager -- responsible for identifying market needs/opportunities, making product-level decisions about offerings/benefits/pricing/packaging/channels/financial goals, and managing sales/customer relationships on behalf of executives. Since products often span multiple scrum teams, some products have a mix of product owners and product managers.
We'll recap product owner basics, map that against product managers for commercial software, and talk through approaches to meet all of the product needs for a market-successful product.
Learning Outcomes:
  • what is a product owner?
  • for revenue software companies, how does this align with product manager?
  • failure modes for product owners/managers and strategies to avoid those failures
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rich Mironov

Rich Mironov

CEO, Mironov Consulting
Rich Mironov coaches product executives, product management teams and agile development organizations. He is a seasoned tech executive and serial entrepreneur: the product guy at six start-ups including as CEO and VP Products/Marketing. With deep technical roots in B2B infrastructure, SaaS and consumer online, Rich combines what-we-can-build with what-markets-will-pay-for. Rich has been relentlessly Doing, blogging, speaking, teaching and... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Inman

10:45am

Scrum is 21 – and see how it has grown, but is it not over yet (Dave West)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
For the last 21 years Scrum has slowly become the de-facto standard for Agile development with over 90% of teams using Scrum to deliver working software. But Scrum, now 21 is not the fresh faced process framework that came into the world in the summer of 1995. It has evolved and changed living with commercial, technical, philosophical and practical challenges. And like the very framework that it is based on its development has responded to change. But in a industry of ‘the latest trends’ will there continue to be a role for Scrum, or will its events, artifacts and roles just be consumed by other process frameworks or software development in general. What is the future of Scrum? In this talk product owner of Scrum.org discusses the past, present and future of Scrum using real data from over 200K open assessments and 50K professional assessments to describe the challenges and future of Scrum.
Learning Outcomes:
  • A historic perspective on Scrum
  • An overview of the challenges that Scrum practitioners are having today
  • A glimpse into the potential future of Scrum
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Learning Center

10:45am

Being Agile to become Customer centric (Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The first principle of Agile manifesto says "Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.” But, Is our highest priority to delight our customer, or to delight our sponsor. Do we understand who the real customer is and behave accordingly?
I’ve often seen Agile teams producing software aimed to delight: another departments within their organization, an external organization hiring their development services, their management or even their Product Owners. But, are those the ones to be delighted by the product in development?
I believe that software is awesome when it helps creating awesome experiences to the people the organization is serving. To create those delighting experiences is very important to understand who your real customer is and empathize with him. This session is aimed to create that awareness and to introduce some practical tools that can help creating a "Customer Centric” Agile implementation and culture in organizations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The listener will get from this session easy-to-apply tools to equip their Agile implementation an extra focus on their real customer to maximize customer satisfaction and create an important foundation for the buy-in of Agile by the business.
  • Such as:
  • Connecting User Story Maps with Customer Journey map
  • Including Personas and Customer empathy tools in inception
  • Reverse Sprint reviews (The customers does the demo for the team)
  • Creating a Customer centric culture in dev teams using "Customer Centric Epics"
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez

Angel Diaz-Maroto Alvarez

Agile Coach, Agilar
Angel is a very energetic CEC (Certified Enterprise Coach by the Scrum Alliance) who truly enjoy challenges. Making Agile work in complex environments is his specialty and passion. Currently he’s part of Agilar, one of the leading Agile coaching firms in Europe and Latin America. As a trainer, coach, and mentor, he supported several multinational organizations in their Agile journeys. | During his 17+ years of experience in IT Angel has... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Piedmont

10:45am

Decoding the Enigma of Product Discovery & Feature Prioritization (Anu Smalley, Kate Megaw)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Do your customers know what they really want? Do they know the order they want it in?
Most often our customers have an idea, a vision of what it is that they want. They rarely know in depth what “it” looks like. They will “know what they want when they see it”.
So how do we ensure that we are helping our Customers and Product Owners identify and focus on the items that will bring the most value to them?
This interactive session will use Innovation Games® to help understand and practice discovery & prioritization of Product Features.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn and experience the value of product discovery and how to help your customer by using "Prune The Product Tree" from Innovation Games®
  • Understand and practice product prioritization by using "Buy a Feature" from Innovation Games®


Speakers
avatar for Kate Megaw

Kate Megaw

Certified Scrum Trainer & Agile Coach | COO, Braintrust Consulting Group
Kate is the Chief Operating Officer of the Braintrust Consulting Group where she specializes in working with executives and C-level professionals as well as serving as an Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer®. Before co-founding The Braintrust Consulting Group, Kate worked as a Project Manager and then ScrumMaster and Coach for the global leader in Corporate Actions automation. Kate co-chaired Scrum Gathering Orlando 2016, and is a Global... Read More →
avatar for Anu Smalley

Anu Smalley

Agile Coach and Trainer, SolutionsIQ
Anu is an Enterprise Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer® with SolutionsIQ - providing education and coaching, consulting services to clients across the United States. Anu has 20+ years of experience. | Anu’s passion for teaching and coaching shows in her ability to facilitate large and small groups as she leads them through their Agile journey. | Anu holds SCRUM ALLIANCE® credentials of CST® CSM, CSPO, CSP, has co-chaired the... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover FG

11:30am

Creating Great Teams - How Self-Selection Lets People Excel (Sandy Mamoli, David Mole)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Stable teams have proven to be twice as productive as teams that are assembled and disassembled for specific projects and research shows that 60% of team effectiveness is attributable to team design.
If the most important factor for team performance is the combination of skills, personalities and relations between team members, the crucial question is “How do we best design teams?”.
Here’s a radical idea: Trust people to know best and let them decide which team they should work in. Let them Self-Select!
Self-selection is the simplest, fastest and most efficient way to form stable teams, based on the belief that people are at their happiest and most productive if they can choose what they work on and who they work with.
In October 2013, New Zealand’s largest eCommerce provider ran the biggest Self-Selection event in the world since WWII, using a process which has since been repeated many times in multiple locations across the world.
In this presentation we will share our learnings and experiences from more than two years of running Self-Selection processes in large organisations. We will show you a repeatable process for how to establish efficient teams in growing organisations and we will answer questions such as “Why would I do that”? and “How can I convince management?”.
If you work in an industry or company that involves teams then this talk is for you!
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Why Self-Selection is the best way to ensure the best team design
  • How to run Self-Selection events for that scale to at several 100 people
  • To anticipate people's questions and concerns before asking them to self-select into teams
  • What the pre-requisites for self-selection success are
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sandy Mamoli

Sandy Mamoli

Director of All Things Agile, Nomad8
Sandy Mamoli é consultora Ágil na Nomad8, com ênfase em cultura e liderança. Trabalhou em Amsterdam e Copenhagen para se tornar uma das principais Coaches da Nova Zelândia, ela compartilha o seu talento prático e uma paixão para advogar em nome da Agilidade para negócios ao redor do mundo. Sandy é ex-atleta olímpica, geek, viciada em gadgets e palestrante internacional... Read More →
avatar for David Mole

David Mole

Agile Coach, Nomad8
After speaking about Self-Selecting teams at last year's conference, this year I will be speaking about how we used Daniel Pink's work around Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose to create happier more motivated teams. | | @Molio | https://nz.linkedin.com/in/davidmole


Monday July 25, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Kennesaw

1:30pm

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss? Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment. We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join!

Monday July 25, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Grand Hall Foyer

2:00pm

Dynamic Cultural and Technical Transformation - Challenges for Engineering Managers (Yukari Hasebe, Mai Le)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Engineering managers are facing challenges everyday. Challenges with conflicts of interest such as aggressive deadlines to build multiple new feature on top of tech debt, demands for engineering excellence while goal is focusing on short term revenue. Frequent organizational changes and re-alignment with moving target goals.
As a leader, we must encourage and guide team for their own growth while focusing on delivery. Yahoo has been experiencing major re-org at least once a quarter. Our portfolio is big and contains many products of different types. This session will share our experience as to how we overcome challenges and adapt to frequently changing environment without slowing down. In order to be successful, cultural and technical transformation must happen together hand in hand to build a culture and structure where changes can be accommodated as business as usual.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Align team and process to accommodate changes anytime
  • Practice your sales pitch - WIIFM (What’s In It For Me?)
  • "Buy-in" from both top and bottom enables team for maximum possibility
  • Always consider scalability to minimize maintenance cost
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yukari Hasebe

Yukari Hasebe

Director, Technical Program Management, Yahoo
avatar for Mai Le

Mai Le

Engineering Director, Uber


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Kennesaw

2:00pm

Introduction to Agile Requirements: User Stories, Backlogs, and Adaptive Planning (Mary Gorman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
One of the most challenging and trouble-prone aspects of agile product development is discovering the right product requirements to deliver at the right time, for the right customer. User stories and product backlogs are useful tools, but wait—there’s more!
Join Mary Gorman in this fast-paced introduction to a common-sense, tested approach to agile requirements. You will follow a story as it’s sliced across seven product dimensions with a constant focus on delivering value. You’ll realize the power of sketching analysis models to “see” agile requirements and the strength of using acceptance criteria to ideate and confirm agile requirements. Mary also will showcase creative ways to engage in collaborative conversations that result in right and ready agile requirements.
Discover how a holistic, adaptive approach to agile requirements provides a sound foundation for your product backlog through effective stakeholder conversations, collaboration, and a shared understanding of ever-evolving product needs. This session will help you appreciate how adaptive planning replaces change management with value management.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how valuing product options is key for slicing user stories
  • Define the four functional and three nonfunctional dimensions of every user story
  • Outline several ways agile teams holistically analyze user stories
  • Describe how adaptive planning enables agile teams to deliver value faster


Speakers
avatar for Mary Gorman

Mary Gorman

VP Quality and Delivery, EBG Consulting
Mary coaches teams and facilitates agile product discovery workshops. She trains business, customer and technology stakeholders in collaborative practices essential for defining high value products. Mary speaks at industry conferences and writes for the Agile, business analysis and project management communities. Mary is co-author with Ellen Gottesdiener of the recently released book Discover to Deliver: Agile Product Planning and Analysis.


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover AB

2:00pm

Scaling in Context (or Failing in Pretext) - Première Partie (Anders Ivarsson, Jurgen Appelo)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Scaling Agile to work in large organizations is a hot topic. Some coaches and consultants offer frameworks (SAFe, LeSS, Holocracy) but others don't believe such frameworks can work. Other companies publish their own custom approach (Spotify, Menlo, Zappos) but it appears that people often copy these without thinking. Apparently, silver bullets, copy/paste solutions and shu-level practices are easy to sell but don't enable real transformation. However, there is some evidence of "Teal" or "Management 3.0" organizations reporting some mild successes.
Considering the fast-changing environments that many companies are faced with, is it worth addressing the complex problem of Agile at Scale with such simple or complicated solutions? Are some companies successful because or despite of the solutions that they copied from the market? What problem are we trying to solve by "scaling agile"? What is really different when we work with 50,000 people instead of just five? And which things in our context determine whether proposed solutions have actual value for us?
Bring your own real-world experience; what you've tried, what's worked, what's failed, and what you think might be the causes. Engage in spirited debate as we learn together, even continuing to learn and share well beyond this session and even this conference.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Spring

2:00pm

Scrabbling To Find A Good Agile Game? Which Should Be Uno On Your List? (Tom Grant)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The good news: Serious games help Agile teams address some of their most intractable problems, by disrupting the normal rules by which we operate. Not only are they effective, but they're fun, so it's easy to get people to voluntarily change their behavior long enough to get better results than normal means can provide.
The even better news: When we feel that a game might help an Agile team, we have a jam-packed closet of them available to us.
The bad news: The choices are overwhelming. If you're not familiar with all of the games available, which one is best suited to address the challenge the team is now facing? Will we have to impose some "house rules" on the game to fit our circumstances? And what if there isn't a game that helps us with our problem — how hard is it to design one on our own?
In this session, we will help people score big points with serious games, with the minimum effort required. We will focus on three common types of challenges that teams face, where serious games can help:
  • Customer insights. How can we better understand what our customers want? For example, how can we use a game to change the conversation to help us get a sense of what the minimum viable product might be, before we make our first attempt at building one?
  • Deeper learning. How can we use games as experiential learning tools, making a greater impact on Agilists than words alone can accomplish?
  • Agile at scale. How can games help the adoption of Agile at scale? For example, how can you use games to hold massive retrospectives, and follow up on the results?
(There are others types of challenges that serious games can address, but three common ones are plenty for this presentation.)
For each of these challenges, we'll get into the nature of the problem, which "rules of the game" need to be disrupted, some examples of games that can help, and real-world examples of people who have done exactly that. And, of course, we'll play a couple of games, too.
We will also discuss a strategy for going beyond the first game. For example, software product development starts with an idea, moves to the definition of the minimum viable product, and then generates a prioritized backlog. Which games can help with each of these activities?
This session will end with a game design challenge. At the beginning, we will ask participants to write down a challenge they face that they think a serious game might help address. (Examples might include, We just don't seem to understand what our customers want, We can't figure out how to prioritize technical debt clean-up, and We have a tough time prioritizing our backlog.) At the end of the session, after hearing the ways in which serious games might help them, people at each table will select one or two challenges that they have identified. Everyone at the table will have 15 minutes to work out a serious game strategy (with the help of the presenter, and other serious game practitioners). The people at each table will select one, then use what we've discussed to build a quick serious game strategy to address that challenge. What sort of game would work best? Is there a good off-the-shelf game available, or would you need to custom-build something? How would you use the results? (Time permitting, participants are welcome to discuss a second challenge.)
AGENDA
* Quick introduction to serious games, and why they work (5 minutes)
* Games for customer insights (10 minutes)
* Play a game: Prune The Product Tree (10 minutes)
* Games for deeper learning (5 minutes)
* Play a game: Self-organization wins again! (5 minutes)
* Games for predicting the future (5 minutes)
* Other challenges that games can address (5 minutes)
* Selecting the game that addresses my problem (5 minutes)
* Customizing and custom-building games (5 minutes)
* Building a strategy beyond the first game (5 minutes)
* Design challenge (10 minutes)
* Wrap-up (5 minutes)
Tom Grant is Practice Director for Agile Product Management & Software Engineering Excellence at Cutter Consortium. He helps organizations use Agile, Lean, serious games, and other approaches to innovate better. He has experience working in and working with software organizations, both large and small. Tom regularly designs and runs games for clients who need new, disruptive ways to get better customer insights, ignite organizational change, generate and assess options, and reap the other benefits that serious games can provide. He has a library of over 600 board games that he uses for, um, "research," and he interviews game designers for a semi-regular podcast. He also maintains a web site, Serious Games At Work, that archives success stories about serious games. Tom lives in Washington, DC.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the different types of games available.
  • Identify the type of game that will help
  • Learn a strategy for getting the most out of games.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tom Grant

Tom Grant

Senior Consultant, Net Objectives
Tom Grant is a senior consultant at Net Objectives. Previously, he was practice director for Agile Project Management & Software Engineering Excellence at Cutter Consortium, and a senior analyst at Forrester Research. Before that, he worked in software companies in Silicon Valley. Tom helps his clients with their software innovation strategy, which includes Agile, Lean, and other methods. | | Tom is a contributing member of the Agile... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Dunwoody

2:00pm

Games for Doing (Don McGreal)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
This fun, energetic, and interactive session will explore how games and other exercises can help teams better collaborate to get things done. Games are not just child's play, we will discuss how games are a serious technique for facilitating and accelerating creative work. The audience will participate in a series of games that can be applied in their day-to-day work to make collaboration more engaging and meaningful.
This session is for Product Owners, Facilitators, Product Managers, Development Teams, or anyone involved in creative, collaborative work. After a quick introduction on the power of play, the audience will participate in four or five games selected to demonstrate different styles and work outputs.
All games and instructions will be made available on TastyCupcakes.org for reference.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Create better meetings through more engagement and collaboration
  • Learn how a team can work together more effectively with games
  • Learn a new set of facilitation tools for:
  • - Creating Business Models
  • - Creating Vision
  • - Creating Product Backlogs
  • - Prioritizing
  • - Sizing
  • Have fun
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Don McGreal

Don McGreal

VP, training, Improving
In his role as VP of Learning Solutions at Improving Enterprises, Don McGreal is a hands-on Agile consultant and instructor.  He specializes in Agile Coaching at the enterprise and team levels within larger organizations. Don is a Scrum.org Professional Scrum Trainer who has authored and taught classes for thousands of software professionals around the globe. He is also co-founder of TastyCupcakes.org, a comprehensive collection of... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency VI

2:00pm

A Millennial’s Perspective on Software Craftsmanship (Ajay Fewell, Jesse Fewell)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Have you noticed a difference between younger and older software engineers? Are you a senior engineer wondering how to attract, let alone mentor, the next generation of crafts(wo)men like myself? Or maybe you're a young new starter confused why those more experienced guys do software the way they do?
In this entertaining town hall meeting, I’ll share what my fellow millennials are thinking and talking about in the profession of software. Then my dad will share what he sees us taking for granted, and summarize how to avoid mistakes he's seen in his experience as an agile software coach (whatever that is) . We'll contrast things from career trends (the established"Knowledge Worker" versus the rising "Learning Worker") to architectures (yesterday's "platforms" versus today's "micro services").
Change is afoot, and whether you are a GenX-er, a Millennial, a Boomer, or somewhere in between, this interactive session will offer you insights for us working together.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What is the difference in CULTURAL context between Millennial, GenX, and Boomer software professionals.
  • How yesterday's TECHNOLOGIES informed older engineer's choices, and how today's technologies are changing that.
  • Which software PRACTICES come more naturally to Millennials, and which are missing.
  • What are the software CAREER paths senior engineers have taken, relative to Millennials.
  • What we can LEARN for each other for guiding our path as crafts(wo)men.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ajay Fewell

Ajay Fewell

Student, Student
Ajay Fewell is a high-schooler at the tech magnet Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology, focusing on quantum computing and cryptography. He is a frequent competitor in hackathons and CTFtime.org events. Currently, he serves on a research team at George Mason University, simulating air traffic control security protocols for the Brazilian Air Force.
avatar for Jesse Fewell

Jesse Fewell

Agile Coach & Trainer, JesseFewell.com
Jesse Fewell is a writer, coach, and trainer in the world of management and innovation. From Minneapolis to Malaysia, he's helped startups and conglomerates alike catapult to breakthrough results. His adventures are written down in "Can You Hear Me Now", his handbook for remote teams. A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, he helped bring agile methods to PMPs around the world by co-creating the PMI-ACP agile certification, and co-authoring... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover C

2:00pm

Strong-Style Pairing (Llewellyn Falco, Maaret Pyhäjärvi)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Pair programming is one of the most controversial of 12 core extreme programming practices. One of the reasons for this is that many of the styles of pair programming have troublesome traps for people. This is especially true when a pair has significant differences in skill or knowledge.
Strong-style pair programming is a method of pairing designed to avoid these traps. In strong-style, “for an idea to go from your head to the computer, it must go through someone else’s hands”. We will do a lot of exercises to demonstrate both the techniques of strong-style pairing, why it works and why it succeeds when other pairing styles fail.
Strong-style is also the foundation of mob programming, a modern team collaboration practice. Join us to learn to work well in pairs, regardless of the pair’s differences.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to introduce pairing to a new person
  • Getting the most of our driver - navigator roles
  • Common traps
  • Moving through levels of abstraction
  • Sense and respond


Speakers
avatar for Llewellyn Falco

Llewellyn Falco

Agile Coach, Spun Labs
Llewellyn Falco is an Agile Technical Coach specializing in Legacy Code and Test Driven Development. He is the creator of the open source testing tool ApprovalTests( www.approvaltests.com ), co-founder of TeachingKidsProgram ( www.teachingkidsprogramming.org ) and a PluralSight author.
avatar for Maaret Puhajarvi

Maaret Puhajarvi

Testing Specialist, Granlund Oy
Software specialist with soft spots for hands-on testing, helping teams grow and building successful products and businesses. Agile, Lean, Lean startup are mindsets I work with. I work towards happiness and wellbeing of people who create software - not just programmers.


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover FG

2:00pm

Identifying and Recruiting DevOps Engineers into Your Organization and Community (Julie Gunderson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As a result of an industry moving towards automation and large scale systems management, recruiters and hiring managers face new challenges in finding the right people for their teams. DevOps is a more than just a skill set, it is a mindset of incorporating operations and development to take a new approach to technological challenges. The market for DevOps Engineers is incredibly tight, with major competition from top companies across the globe. There is no magic recipe for recruiting the perfect DevOps Engineer, however with the right ingredients of community building, cultural understanding and technical savvy; recruiters, hiring managers and anyone interested in building a great culture and team can make something amazing. Recruiting can often times have a negative connotation due to a perception that recruiters are unfamiliar with or removed from the technology. On the flip side, Engineering Managers who are looking to build their teams may be more focused on the technical skills and not the cultural aspect. Understanding how to balance the technical and cultural side to recruiting is a key element to bringing the best people aboard.
The learning objectives in this session will focus key competencies to first identify DevOps Engineers and then how to recruit, develop a community and build a pipeline to draw from.
Learning Objective to Include:
• Understanding the DevOps movement and where to find the right people
• Thinking beyond the technical and understanding the culture
• How to be more than “just a recruiter”
• Building a pipeline and the importance of being proactive
• Growing the Community you want to see and what it means to be a Community Evangelist
There will be 55 minutes devoted to the session and then 20 minutes for Q&A and sharing of best practices.
Breakdown of time:
7 minutes: Opening, Agenda and My Story
13 minutes: Identification of DevOps Engineer including background, what DevOps means, history of DevOps
10 minutes: Thinking beyond the technical; including why hiring managers need to look beyond technical skills, the importance of incorporating the whole engineering team into recruitment of the right candidate, understanding how the culture of a team can impact a candidates’ decision making process and how to fit the “feels” in with the technical.
5 minutes: The importance of recruiters’ understanding of technology, including tips on how to better grasp technical concepts and exercises even the most “non-technical” can do and why it’s important to understand the culture of the community.
10 minutes: The importance of building a community; including defining what a community is, social media tools, the importance of conference attendance and meet-ups.
10 minutes: Building a pipeline; the value of a pipeline, how to maintain relationships with the DevOps Engineers you have met, the importance of follow-up and consistency.
15 minutes: Q&A
5 minutes: Closing
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how to identify a DevOps Engineer by gaining an understanding of what DevOps means. Understand how to think beyond the technical by gaining awareness of the importance of culture and mindset within DevOps and why it is important to have a balance between the technical and cultural. Learn how and why it is important to develop recruiters technical understanding. Gain an understanding of the importance of building a community. Learn how to build and maintain a pipeline of qualified DevOps Engineers.


Speakers
avatar for Julie Gunderson

Julie Gunderson

Relationship and Community Manager, Taos


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Lenox

2:00pm

Deploying a Data-Centric Approach to Enterprise Agility (Jorgen Hesselberg, Rajan Seriampalayam)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Enterprise organizations are increasingly adopting Agile as a way to better focus on adaptive value creation, customer satisfaction, and employee engagement. But how do you as a business leader and change agent know whether you’re getting the most out of your investment or that you continue to improve as an organization? Through a combination of key objective metrics, conscious observation, individual interviews and a third-party, independent assessment instrument, Intel is driving a strategic, data-centric approach to enterprise Agile adoption. In this workshop we will describe what this assessment methodology is and go through several interactive exercises to demonstrate how to use it. We will also provide a detailed case study of how Intel is using this methodology to continuously improve its Agile capabilities. Participants will gain an understanding of how an empirical, data-driven approach to enterprise transformation can lead to uncommon insights and help complement their own continuous improvement programs.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * Learn what assessment methodology is and why it might be a helpful tool for your organization
  • * Understand the implications of a data-centric agile transformation approach at team, program and organizational levels
  • * See the practical application of the methodology at Intel and what continuous improvement benefits it helped spawn
  • * Learn how to immediately apply the methodology as a complement to a strategic approach to agility in the enterprise
  • * Understand how comparative agility can be used in your organization and what benefits you can expect to see
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rajan Seriampalayam

Rajan Seriampalayam

Dir. SW Engineering Best Practices, Intel Security


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Piedmont

2:00pm

How to be Agile in Non-IT Organizations - Breaking the Software Constraint (Jake Calabrese)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
You get a call from a friend who wants to meet for coffee, she says she’s heard about this “agile-thing” and wonders if it can benefit her organization. You’re a ScrumMaster and you know a lot about agile, but she is in HR. You wonder how you can relate the concepts you know work for IT organizations, to HR.
You know how to talk about agile within IT, but with everything from the Manifesto to conference sessions focusing on software – it occurs to you that software might actually be constraining agile’s value. What would technical debt, demos, and velocity look like in HR? What about other departments like marketing or businesses that produce products that are not software based?
This session, through a series of conversations, explores how you might help your friend.
1. We will start by exploring the initial conversation you have with her when you meet for coffee. What will you tell your friend? Will she care about the Manifesto, demos, and velocity? Will 2 week iterations even make sense for an HR team (or any group outside of software)?
2. She liked what you had to say when you met for coffee, and asks if you can join her as well as her boss to talk more. We will explore what you might say in reply to questions that focus less on getting the work done and more on tracking and managing. How will that conversation be different?
3. They decide the ideas you explained are worth moving forward with and say “We are sold! How do we get started?” What might you refer them to? What are some straightforward steps you can recommend to help them get started with agile.
Agile is valuable and it can change the world - if we don’t let software constrain it. We will explore, through a series of interactive exercises and discussions, how you can help people understand agile and start applying the concepts in any industry.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify recommended actionable steps to help your friend get started with agile (in any industry).
  • Start your list of talking points explaining agile and it’s value, that don’t mention software or weird agile terms.
  • Assess differences and similarities between agile in IT (software) and agile outside of IT.
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency V

2:00pm

Agile Acquisition not Acquisition for Agile (Joshua Seckel)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Often, we will use the phrase agile acquisition when we really mean acquisition for agile. Both agile acquisition and acquisition for agile are necessary to deliver efficiently across government organizations. The processes within the federal government for doing acquisition means that we may spend a year or more to award a contract for work to begin. This creates a significant delay is beginning projects or programs that impedes the speed of delivery. Instead, we need to move toward a true agile acquisition process where we change how we execute acquisition so that we can begin delivery in much faster fashion.
This workshop will examine how to change our acquisition processes to become more agile and able to support the delivery of IT services in a much faster manner. We will look at both successes and failures in acquisition and determine what changes need to be made in order to meet the quickly changing needs of government. Both contractor and employee viewpoints will be considered and discussed. We will look specifically at ways that government is trying to make these changes in the DHS Procurement Innovation Lab, the Office of Federal Procurement Agile training, as well as others and how those activities may play into your organization and procurement activities.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What is the current process for federal acquisition and what experiments are happening to make that process more agile
  • What additional changes need to happen in contracting to deliver in a more agile fashion and create more responsiveness in government
  • How the current process may hinder actually being able to deliver in an agile fashion
  • Specific changes to be made to the procurement process to adopt more agile delivery and to better support agile execution
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Seckel

Joshua Seckel

Chief of Applied Technology Division, USCIS
I lead the Applied Technology Division at US Citizenship and Immigration Services. That division includes architecture, independent test, quality assurance, change and release management, strategic vendor management, and agile coaches helping to transform USCIS to deliver better value to business faster.


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Fairlie

2:00pm

Emergent Leadership in Action (David Chilcott)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Provocative Assertion: Your organization is perfectly designed to get exactly the results you're already getting.
The three cornerstones of the Agile Mindset are: Value, Leadership and Continuous Improvement. In this experiential workshop we'll focus on the Leadership aspect of Agile success.
Beyond "Inspect and Adapt" is "Sense and Respond".
Both are necessary aspects of Agile leadership. Using Inspect and Adapt we test and measure our results and make changes to improve them or to learn. This is a trailing indicator. Sense and Respond allows us to respond to what is happening in the present moment. Sometimes we can even sense what is trying to happen and create the results we want in real time. Sense and Respond is a leading indicator.
Agile leadership works best when we include both knowing AND sensing. There are differences between knowing what to do, being able to do it and being able to do it well!
We will use two team-based exercises to get immediate feedback and to sense and respond to tensions and each other in real time. Both exercises highlight our relationship with leadership and power; as well as the subtle influence our own stance and beliefs on our ability to create the outcomes we are hoping for. Using direct experience to practice the craft of Agile Leadership. This is "Emergent Leadership" in action.
We will anchor the learning by debriefing with our peers in teams and with the whole group. There will be time for individual reflection. We will also craft learning experiments as "homework" to deepen our practice of leadership.
Learning Outcomes:
  • a basic understanding of the three cornerstones of the Agile Mindset. Value, Leadership and Continuous Improvement
  • a basic understanding of what Agile Leadership is
  • “hands-on” experience of the challenges of Agile Leadership
  • specific next actions to support your individualized learning and practice of Agile Leadership


Speakers
avatar for David Chilcott

David Chilcott

The Grand Wazoo, Outformations, Inc.
Agile Leadership, Emergent Leadership, Agile Spirit, Deep Democracy


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Centennial 4

2:00pm

How to Train Your HiPPO (Joshua Arnold)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Have you noticed the impact on decision-making when someone more senior in your organisation shares their opinion?
Meet the HiPPO: the Highest Paid Person’s Opinion.
Sometimes it’s subtle and unintended. Other times it’s more direct and intentional.
Either way, the HiPPO is a dangerous animal in software development.
When the HiPPO is allowed to drive decision-making this has a number of negative side-effects.
Options are prematurely closed down.
Critical assumptions get hidden.
Information about value and urgency are buried.
Dates are often promised (prematurely).
Overall, the chances of delivering value is reduced and the risk of failure increases.
An untrained HiPPO is one of the most dangerous animals to let loose around Product Development.
Whilst the HiPPO may like to be in charge, they don’t really want to be responsible for developing products that nobody wants. So, how can we help the HiPPO to help themselves?
Come and hear more about why HiPPO driven decision-making is so dangerous and learn some simple techniques you can use to train your HiPPO.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why the HiPPO is so dangerous in product development
  • Five tools to help you with training your HiPPO


Speakers
avatar for Joshua Arnold

Joshua Arnold

Engineer, blackswanfarming.com
With a background in fluid mechanics and systems engineering, Joshua has worked for the past decade with various organisations to improve their systems of innovation and delivery. In particular, Joshua has focused on the problem of prioritisation and portfolio management, helping to bring the fuzzy-front-end of development into focus and aligned toward faster time-to-market and improved return on investment. | | He recently co-authored an... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Baker

2:00pm

My Own Personal Leanness (Catherine Swetel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Personal Kanban is a gateway drug. After you begin visualizing your tasks and goals across all facets of life, you can start viewing the items in your backlog as options. You can think of your life as a system that can be primed to increase the likelihood of certain outcomes.
This session will present real life examples of how lean and agile principles and practices can be applied at a personal level. An exercise will follow each example to illustrate how you can try Personal Kanban, Real Options, and Cynefin to balance and prioritize work, home/family, and social commitments. Applying these concepts and principles at a personal level can also be a great way for coaches, Scrummasters, and facilitators to fully understand a technique before applying it with a team or organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Create and populate a personal workflow visualization i.e. a Personal Kanban board
  • Describe prioritization decisions and trade-offs
  • Understand the complexity of different tasks, allocate time and effort based on complexity
  • Use basic affinity mapping techniques to select areas for improvement or amplification


Speakers
avatar for Catherine Swetel

Catherine Swetel

Cat has experience applying lean principles in a variety of settings: from startups to large enterprises, warehouses to web, etc. She is passionate about increasing diversity in tech. In her leisure time, Cat enjoys making jokes about Bitcoin, drinking beer, and reading feminist literature.


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Courtland

2:00pm

This is Your Brain on Agile: Overcoming Fear, Anger, and Apathy When Teaching Agile Topics (Joe Ziadeh)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What causes the unexpected resistance and fear we’ve all seen when teaching about Agile? Why is learning about Agile different than anything else we study to help our organizations grow? And most importantly, what can we do as Agilists to help?
In this session, you’ll learn tips and techniques to help everyone you share information with (from new students to members of the C-suite) on these issues. We’ll dig into the problem and discuss some of the core neuroscience and psychological concepts that cause some common responses like fear, resistance, and apathy. We’ll discuss ways to change our teaching and presentation styles to help with these problems by making the ideas less threatening and more interesting. And we’ll do this through some improv exercises and engaging experiments we can take right back to our classes.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn an experiment that demonstrates fear of the unknown
  • Learn improv exercises to improv collaboration and positivity
  • Help instructors build more engaging and enjoyable training
  • Give instructors tools to help reduce fear, anxiety, and apathy in their students
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency VII

2:00pm

Everything is important RIGHT NOW! How do I determine a Minimum Viable Product? (Jenny Swan, Amanda Tygart)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
How do you determine the Minimum Viable Product for your users?

We will show you how choosing a Primary user (or Persona) and a brainstorming technique called Mind mapping are essential tools for identifying what key functionalities you should be delivering sooner (rather than later) to your users.
“You’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology.” – Steve Jobs
This workshop will give the tools for any team, using any methodology, and at any maturity level, to discuss Minimum Viable Product. This workshop will help teams (including the Product Owner) establish:
1) How to identify a Primary User, a.k.a, Persona using a Persona Map (see image in attachment)
a. A Persona map includes 1 primary user, 2 secondary users and 3 tertiary users based on whom the team believes will be the targeted users (designing for everyone is designing for no one)
2) Potential Roadmap created using a Mind map or Visual Notes (see images in attachment)
3) Establish a Minimum Value Product – Prioritize the work
4) Be aligned with your Product Owner/Business on what Success looks like using visual tools (the persona map and mind map)
Learning Outcomes:
  • • Understand why it’s important to identify a primary user (Persona) using a Persona map
  • • Learn how to use a Mind map along with your Primary Persona to brainstorm possible wants and needs for your Primary persona with help of your business or Product Owner
  • • Determine Minimum Viable Product (MVP) and a potential roadmap using the Persona and Mind map
  • • Use simple visual tools to align expectations on capabilities and functionalities that are part of MVP
Attachments:


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover DE

2:00pm

Digital Disruption: Let's Create The Future of Agile (Robert Woods)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
For years we've been working to help organizations become adaptive, collaborative, agile and innovative without fear of failure. The results of such endeavors has been the outcropping of something called "Digital Disruption"; Innovations that are changing the landscape of how modern business is done. In some cases we're seeing unprecedented success. In other cases we're seeing a concerning lack of ability to adapt and change when Digital Disruption takes place. What does this mean for the future of Agile? What might future Agile frameworks look like? If you had to write a 2036 Agile Manifesto, what might it say based on Digital Disruption? Through an interactive workshop, attendees will learn how Digital Disruption is creating a new future of business and collaboratively get answers to these exact questions.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What is Digital Disruption and why is it important to me?
  • How have Big Data and Modern Analytics contributed to Digital Disruption?
  • How Agile contributed to Digital Disruption?
  • What is the Digital Disruption impact on Agile?
  • What will the future of Agile principles and its supporting frameworks look like in 20 years?


Speakers
avatar for Robert Woods

Robert Woods

Agile Coach & Delivery Manager, MATRIX Resources
Robert Woods serves as an Agile Coach and Delivery Manager at MATRIX. He has been in IT for over 18 years serving in such roles as Sr. Systems and Networking Engineer, Project Manager, Program Manager, and Agile Coach. Robert has spent years working with organizations on collaborative lean development, Agile testing techniques, requirements analysis, project envisioning, relationship management, Agile within ITSM and Agile leadership.Robert has... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Learning Center

2:00pm

Build, Measure, Learn is Not Enough (Amanda Stockwell)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The Build, Measure, Learn loop is at the center of the Lean Startup approach and has been a successful model across the Agile world at large. While the framework for collecting iterative feedback and the focus on building a Minimal Viable Product (MVP) are great, the way most companies implement Build, Measure, Learn isn’t as effective as it could be. Here’s why: most companies still jump right in to building a skeleton version of a product, assuming that they can only get good feedback once they have something working to show users. However, there is much about the users and their needs that you can investigate far before you build even the simplest prototype or landing page. You can learn before you start building.
I will demonstrate this theory with examples from several client projects and provide tips for teams to infuse learning into their process as soon as possible.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Overview of the Build, Measure, Learn loop and its benefits
  • Understanding of how the Build, Measure, Learn loop can be augmented to better test concepts
  • Concrete tips for infusing learning into the process as early as possible
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Stockwell

Amanda Stockwell

Vice President of UX, 352 Inc.
Amanda is the VP of UX at 352 inc. where she leads a team that provides user research, usability testing, and UX strategy services. Amanda's expertise has helped companies new to user experience to assimilate user-centered design into their existing processes. Additionally, Amanda has unique career advancement insight from her tenure working with a top recruiting company, where she evaluated client needs and associated job descriptions... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Inman

2:00pm

Critically Thinking Your Design DNA (Kupe Kupersmith)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The number one thing CEOs are focusing on is customer experience. This goes beyond user experience. In today's environment organizations are building software faster, but still building things that customers don't want to use. Organizations need an approach to creatively solve problems or go after opportunities. Design Thinking is that approach.
In this session Kupe will share his experience and insights on how you and your team can thrive at the intersection of critical thinking and design thinking.
The outputs of Design will provide you the guidance and information your team needs to define your backlog. When Design Thinking and Critical Thinking is happening in organizations we see limited resources being utilized on initiatives which provide the greatest business outcomes. Design Thinking is an innovative approach to get your team in that high performing mode.
Experience problem solving in a different way (starting with the customer experience). Learn by doing and see design and critical thinking in action.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - What is Design Thinking
  • - Myth bust the thought that Design Thinking is just innovation and creativity wrapped in new package
  • - Learn some easy tips to be more visual
  • - See how you and your team can add value to their organizations by utilizing Design Thinking
  • - Learn what critical thinking skills are necessary for effective Design Thinking


Speakers
avatar for Kupe Kupersmith

Kupe Kupersmith

President, B2T Training
Kupe Kupersmith, President, B2T Training, possesses over 15 years of experience of practicing business analysis in various industries. If that’s not enough, he is also an experienced improvisational comedian. With this combined experience he has been helping teams become high performing teams by focusing on applying improvisation skills to improve communication and collaboration. As the president of B2T Training, Kupe uses his these skills to... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Centennial 1

2:45pm

6 days/week with 20hr of engineering/day and multiple releases in one day - Yahoo Search (Yukari Hasebe, Mai Le)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Enterprise distributed Agile model sounds very hard and complicated. In fact yes, it is not easy but there are ways to make it work. When we joined Yahoo Web Search team, we inherited distributed team working in traditional development style where SE and QE located in Bangalore, Engineers in Taiwan, Product in US. With Agile transition including location strategy and management collaboration, our team was able to come up with a model where we can release minimum of six days in a week with more than twenty hours of work hours a day between US and TW office.
This session offers ingredients and recipe for successful and sustainable transition. We will use example to shows how to identify ‘symptoms’ for areas of improvement and how to come up with the mutual agreement and process which keeps everyone engaged.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Location strategy and team structure
  • Various communication style by audience type
  • How to stay in touch and aligned
  • Clean Priority across the board
  • POC first then multiply
  • Always maintain clean CI/CD
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Yukari Hasebe

Yukari Hasebe

Director, Technical Program Management, Yahoo
avatar for Mai Le

Mai Le

Engineering Director, Uber


Monday July 25, 2016 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Kennesaw

3:45pm

Large Scale Agile Transformations: An Insider's Guide and Toolkit (Alan Padula)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are you guilty of being involved in a large agile transformation? See how a multiple offender has pulled them off, the pratfalls taken so you might avoid them, and a few of my favorite tools that you might steal to speed yourself down the road.
5:3:1 – This essential toolkit for accelerating adoption and stifling bad smells emerged from 5 transformations at 3 companies over 1 decade. It is based on hands-on experience from internally leading and supporting large agile transformations of business units of 100-440 people across continents. No theory -- just worn wrenches and bruised knuckles from a company-insider.
What about you? Are you leading, supporting, or recovering from a transformation? If you feel stranded on the side of a cold, dark highway; you are not alone! All organizations and transformations are different -- one size simply does not fit all. But some tools and duct tape can improve your odds. You are invited to see the contents of my roadside toolkit with "open-me-first" instructions. Hopefully there is a tool you can borrow:
  • Agile Mindset Alignment so a Tower of Babel is avoided. Tools: Agile Mindset Agenda, Picture Game
  • Agile Journey and Vision so the past is managed & a better place imagined. Tools: Journey Chart, Visioning
  • Agile Transformation Roadmap so the when, what, how, measures, & value are clear. Tools: Workshop Agenda, Roadmap Template
  • Agile Transformation Teams (People, Process, Technology) so nothing is missed and clear ownership established. Tools: Team Structure and Operating Model
  • Change Management Plan so the burden of being & doing things differently is eased. Tools: 8-Step Change Model, Change Management Matrix
  • Agile Team Training & Coaching so teams are jump-started and quick wins achieved. Tools: Types of Training, Just-In-Time/Wave Adoption Model
  • Agile Leader Training so managers are supported & know their role. Tools: Internal Agile Leader Training Agenda, Is/Is Not Game
While these are not all the tools needed for a large transformation, they are ones that are always handy in my trunk!
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Everyone has a different understanding of what agile is -- a foundation must be laid so everyone speaks the same language and can get excited about the change to come
  • Helping and supporting 2-3 teams ramp up requires a vastly different approach from a large scale transformation effort of 20-30+ teams -- a vision, a roadmap, and change management plan are essential
  • Strong, active sponsorship from the top is an absolute critical element; don't bother with a large scale transformation without it
  • Understanding where an organization has been with agile (often there are tried and failed attempts) is necessary so any unwelcome baggage can be managed - a journey chart helps
  • Organizations need to have a clear understanding of their desired end state (vision) to create excitement to change
  • Co-creating a vision with a customized roadmap vs a generic maturity model is extremely powerful in establishing proper organizational ownership
  • Agile Training and Coaching is absolutely essential. This includes leaders as well as teams.
  • Nothing can replace coaches with real experience to help teams and leaders in the long journey.
  • A Change Management plan is essential to move whole organizations to agile; regular wide-scale communication on the transformation is key
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Kennesaw

3:45pm

Introduction to Agile Testing: Everyone Owns Quality (Matthew Heusser)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Implementing a feature in a two week timebox is easy enough: Reduce scope to a few small changes. The real problem comes when we try to compress testing from months to a day or two.
It is possible, but it will take a lot more than stories, sprints, and standups. The whole team will need to work together, to figure out what to build before we build it, to check for and ensure quality is high at every step, instead of letting uncertainty rise and conducting a mass inspection at the end. Learn to put down old tools, like test cases, test plans, and test strategy documents, along with what to pick up in their place - Exploration, Specification by Example, Unit tests, Build and Deploy automation.
Matt Heusser describes this new way of thinking about testing, how it changes the way we work, and where to go to keep going.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why traditional testing fails in an Agile Environment
  • Understand how frequent delivery changes the way software is built and tested
  • Compare whole-team quality to QA as gatekeeper
  • Understand the impact of first-time quality on a release
  • Understand why traditional attempts to build quality in failed, and how Agile Quality is different
  • Understand Exploratory testing, tooling, and unit tests (TDD), Continuous Integration, and how the four play off each other
  • Know where to go to get started
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Heusser

Matthew Heusser

Principal Consultant, Excelon Development
Matt has deep experience in software testing, project management, development, writing, and systems improvement. His extensive network of contacts in these fields has enabled him to put together a diversified, high-level team of experts at Excelon. | | In 2006, Matt was lead organizer for the initial Great Lakes Software Excellence Conference, a regional event that continues today. He organized the Agile-Alliance Sponsored Workshop on the... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover AB

3:45pm

Scaling in Context (or Failing in Pretext) - Deuxième Partie (Anders Ivarsson, Jurgen Appelo)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Scaling Agile to work in large organizations is a hot topic. Some coaches and consultants offer frameworks (SAFe, LeSS, Holocracy) but others don't believe such frameworks can work. Other companies publish their own custom approach (Spotify, Menlo, Zappos) but it appears that people often copy these without thinking. Apparently, silver bullets, copy/paste solutions and shu-level practices are easy to sell but don't enable real transformation. However, there is some evidence of "Teal" or "Management 3.0" organizations reporting some mild successes.
Considering the fast-changing environments that many companies are faced with, is it worth addressing the complex problem of Agile at Scale with such simple or complicated solutions? Are some companies successful because or despite of the solutions that they copied from the market? What problem are we trying to solve by "scaling agile"? What is really different when we work with 50,000 people instead of just five? And which things in our context determine whether proposed solutions have actual value for us?
Bring your own real-world experience; what you've tried, what's worked, what's failed, and what you think might be the causes. Engage in spirited debate as we learn together, even continuing to learn and share well beyond this session and even this conference.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A



Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Spring

3:45pm

Body Talk - It's Not Just What You Say that Counts (Laura Powers)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
What did you just say? We don’t just talk with our hands – we talk with our whole bodies. And sometimes we have no idea what we really just communicated.
As team members, coaches and leaders – it’s essential that we connect with others and congruently communicate so that our message gets heard. Join us in this hands-on session to learn & practice skills to establish rapport quickly with individuals and groups. Discover body stances based on psychological archetypes that can either support or distract from your message. This session is ideal for anyone who wants to be a more effective influencer and coach by making sure their body language matches their words.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Describe what rapport is and its benefits in communicating with agile teams
  • Practice establishing rapport to pace and lead teams and individuals
  • Learn and practice 5 body stances based on Virginia Satir’s psychological archetypes
  • Learn one body stance that saps the power of effective communication & how to eradicate its habitual appearance
  • Be able to immediately apply these techniques in daily conversations with individuals and agile teams
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency VI

3:45pm

How to Get Your Whole Team Talking (Gil Broza)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
“Agile has too many meetings.” “Our meetings are a waste of time.” “It’s always the same two people talking while everyone else is on their phones or laptops.” Indeed, meetings are often pretty bad… but they are also necessary. Agile teams can’t fully implement the 3 C’s (communication, collaboration, and consensus) only by inhabiting an open space or using a messaging tool. As it turns out, it doesn’t take much to make meetings effective, collaborative, and something to look forward to. Come to this experiential session to learn 10 simple changes you can make – without having to become a professional facilitator – to make your meetings matter.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify the elements of meeting design and flow that encourage everyone to participate helpfully
  • Apply a simple yet powerful process for designing collaborative conversations
  • Upgrade your facilitation style with small changes that make a big difference
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover DE

3:45pm

Insights and Connections: Using Sense Making to Think & Decide in Uncertainty (Lynne Cazaly)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
If machines can think, understand and recognise, cars don’t need drivers, holograms make real what’s not and the internet of things is in everything … what is left for us humans to do?
What can we do in our agile team roles that will bring the greatest value? According to the Institute for the Future (IFTF), Sensemaking is the #1 skill for 2020 and beyond.
Great news! As humans, we have a unique capability to make sense. Sensemaking is the "ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed.” (IFTF)
Sensemaking helps us connect the dots, gain insights and gather up the requirements to make decisions and act. It requires us to think, map and then act.
So if we are to adapt to the VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity) that constant change brings (both in our teams and organisations and in the wider world) we need to generate insights, use our ingenuity and create ideas like never before.
Whether you're picking up a subtle cue, have got a hunch, are generating ideas or seeing things from another person’s perspective, sense making is the skill that helps you join the dots to then ‘move on’ and make decisions.
This workshop session presents you with models, templates, discussion questions and practical tools to apply sense making in your role. You’ll be able to use these sense making skills alone, in teams, and with stakeholders, project sponsors, colleagues, clients and users to gain greater insights and connections.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - Understand the benefits to using sense making approaches in today’s rapidly changing environment
  • - Identify individual and team/collaboration applications for sense making in project, scrum and agile environments
  • - Identify the three key elements of contemporary sense making practice
  • - Learn 3 thinking techniques for sense making
  • - Learn 4 visual mapping techniques for sense making
  • - Learn 2 action approaches for sense making
  • - Identify sources for further learning and application


Speakers
avatar for Lynne Cazaly

Lynne Cazaly

Owner, Lynne Cazaly
Lynne Cazaly is a keynote speaker, author and adviser. She is the author of the books: | | - Making Sense: A Handbook for the Future of Work | - Create Change: How to apply innovation in an era of uncertainty, and | - Visual Mojo: How to capture thinking, convey information and collaborate using visuals. | | She works with executives, senior leaders and project teams on major change and transformation projects. She helps... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Inman

3:45pm

The Agile Database Techniques Stack: Bridging the Agile/Data Cultural Divide (Scott Ambler)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Data, the way that we process it and store it, is one of many important aspects of software-based solutions. Data is the lifeblood of our organizations, supporting real-time business processes and decision making. It is crucial to the success of software development, and to our organization as a whole, that we apply agile and lean strategies to data-oriented activities. Yet for many organizations their data sources prove to be less than trustworthy and their data-oriented development efforts little more than productivity sinkholes. We can, and must, do better.
This presentation begins with a collection of agile principles for data professionals and of data principles for agile developers - the first step in crossing the cultural divide is to understand and appreciate the priorities and strengths of the people that we work with. Our focus is on a collection of practices - the "agile database techniques stack" - that enables development teams to easily and safely evolve databases. These techniques include vertical slicing, clean architecture and design, agile data modelling, database refactoring, database regression testing, continuous database integration, and configuration management. We then show how this technique stack enables agile data warehousing, agile data management, and lean data governance.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover why it can be very challenging adopting agile strategies within the data management space
  • Learn why adopting agile strategies for data management is critical to your organization's success
  • Learn about proven agile database techniques that enable fast, high-quality evolutionary database development
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler

Senior Consulting Partner, Scott Ambler + Associates
Scott is a Senior Consulting Partner of Scott Ambler + Associates, working with organizations around the world to help them to improve their software processes. He provides training, coaching, and mentoring in disciplined agile and lean strategies at both the project and organizational level. Scott is the founder of the Agile Modeling (AM), Agile Data (AD), Disciplined Agile Delivery (DAD), and Enterprise Unified Process (EUP) methodologies. He... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency V

3:45pm

An Executive Insider's Guide to Enterprise Agile Transformation (Scott Richardson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Gain insights and learn real-world strategies and techniques for leading an enterprise or divisional Agile transformation as an executive or senior leader of a large organization.  There will be no discussion of better Retrospectives and team-level topics here! Instead this session will reveal the organizational management and cultural aspects of an enterprise Agile transformation. Participants will learn specific approaches and techniques gained from years as an executive insider with direct accountability for such transformations. This session is aimed at executives, senior leaders, and management.
Via a dynamic high energy presentation, straight talk, and lively participant Q&A, we will cover in-depth topics such as:
  • How to assess your organization's strengths and opportunities regarding Agile adoption at all levels in the organization
  • Key steps to executing a successful Agile transformation
  • How to lead with Agile at the executive, senior leader, and manager levels
  • Connecting business and technology delivery for enterprise-wide agility
  • How to engage Corporate functions (Finance, HR, Procurement, etc.) and turn them into Agile enablers
  • Metrics proven to work at the executive, middle management, and team levels
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how to prepare adequately for and to execute on a truly enterprise-wide Agile transformation
  • Gain clarity into the different ways an executive, a senior leader, and a manager can lead Agile transformations in concert at their respective levels
  • Learn specific ways to connect business, operations, and technology delivery for enterprise-wide agility
  • Appreciate how corporate functions must change to support Agile effectively
  • Understand appropriate and effective uses of metrics for Agile adoption and maturity
Attachments:

Speakers

Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Dunwoody

3:45pm

Building Large, Mission-Critical Software and Systems with SAFe 4.0 (Dean Leffingwell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The larger debate is over. The benefits of team-level Agile are proven and the methods are now rapidly moving across the chasm to enterprises building ever-larger systems, with ever-increasing complexity. Many of these systems are mission critical for the enterprise, and many provide "high assurance" services and solutions to end users that have an unacceptably high social or economic cost of failure.
In order to address solution development risk and to help assure compliance to the internal and external standards that govern these industries, enterprises involved in high-assurance domains—medical equipment, avionics, financial services, automotive, defense and other—have traditionally developed quality management systems based on stage-gated, waterfall development models. But these methods, even with team-level agile practices by themselves, have not scaled to the increasingly demanding worldwide, systems market, where time to market and cost of delay are additional, and critical, economic factors.
In this talk, Dean Leffingwell describes how enterprises can migrate from their existing methods to scaled, program and value-stream level Lean-Agile practices that dramatically improve the speed and quality of solution development. In so doing, enterprises and development practitioners can enjoy the many business and personal benefits of Lean-Agile development, while still conforming to the quality and regulatory standards that govern solution development in those industries.
Learning Outcomes:
  • understand Lean-Agile organizational and operational constructs that align stakeholders, customers and Agile teams to a common solution mission
  • hot to apply incremental development and Agile technical practices to large scale solution development
  • how to scale team-level agile practices, Scrum, XP and kanban to the program, value stream, and portfolio level
  • be introduced to various Lean systems engineering practices, including Set Based design, Model Based Systems Engineering, solution intent and solution context, and frequent, system-level integration
  • know how to apply traceability where necessary, without excessive overhead and cost
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

President, Leffingwell, LLC.


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Centennial 1

3:45pm

Organizational Agility: It's Not a Sprint, It's a Marathon (Stephanie Ockerman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Your organization has "gone Agile." Now what? Whether you are at the beginning or in the middle of transforming your organization, sustainability should be a top priority. You may have some teams working in an agile way, but are they contributing maximum value to the organization? Are benefits translating to an organizational level? Are those benefits sustainable?
This workshop explores the foundation that needs to be established for organizational agility to be sustained over time. You will interact in exercises as small groups discussing the information presented and their own experiences. Groups will identify team-level and organizational-level actions to address some of the complexities of achieving and sustaining organizational agility. As part of the exercises, groups will create visual displays to capture their ideas, and there will be summary report outs to the larger audience.
We will cover the following:
• What does sustainability really mean
• Why sustainable teams are the key to achieving organizational agility
• How to enable and mature teams to maximize value to the organization
• How to enable and sustain Agile culture change at the organizational level
You will walk away from this workshop with actionable ideas for enabling sustainable teams and enabling agility at an organizational level.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • Learn why sustainable teams are the key to achieving organizational agility.
  • • Learn how to enable and mature teams to maximize value to the organization.
  • • Learn how to enable and sustain Agile culture change at the organizational level.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Ockerman

Stephanie Ockerman

Professional Scrum Trainer, Agile Socks LLC
Stephanie is a Scrum.org certified Professional Scrum Trainer, Agile Coach, and Scrum Master. She has over ten years experience delivering IT solutions, and creating and delivering training to IT professionals. During the past six years, Stephanie has focused on a career grounded by Agile values and principles, creating a minimalist lifestyle, and experiencing the world. She is passionate about helping others discover a path to happier... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Piedmont

3:45pm

Tax authority in agile transition: road to glory (Sabina Renshof, Dick Verheije)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
2015: The management team of an department of an European Tax Authority wants to improve the agile way of work to create value earlier, to shorten development cycles and increase number of feedback loops, to shorten the chain and to put responsibility lower in the organization to decrease the number of escalations.
The environment for this agile experiment is not easy: waterfall governance, bottom up agile initiatives without top down support and a heavy project organization.
September 2015: we hire a coach to help us improve the agile way of work with scrum and SAFe.
November 2015: the coach starts.
If you were the coach, how would you approach the agile transition? Scaling? Scrum or not? And if not scrum what else? Would you start with management? Which Management? How would you "manage" the transition? If the management had chosen SAFe, would you suggest another scaling model? How would your agile transition roadmap look like? What should be the scope? How would you cooperate with management? What is your position and does it change?
In this workshop of 75 minutes we are going to present the case of the tax authority (step1) then work with you in groups to create an agile transition roadmap based on the case of the Tax Authority (step 2) and then we will compare your transition plans with the one of the tax authority (step 3) to finally try to translate the outcome to your own situation.
At this moment we are in the beginning of our transition: our first SAFe Agile Release Train starts soon. We hope to tell you more at the conference!
Learning Outcomes:
  • - steps in agile transition from a change management perspective for a big gov. organization
  • - roadmap for agile transition
  • - what management needs to do and wants to know
  • - how to chose the right intervention
  • - profile of coach
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Renshof

Sabina Renshof

Agile Coach @Dutch Tax Authority, Bureau BD
Change is a strategic asset - Deliver quality fast - Building powerfull next step Organizations | | | My main goal is to promote, spread and safeguard the Agile mindset in the organization. I am experienced in guiding and driving adoption of the agile way of work in R&D/complex regulated solution development - profit and non-profit - and can share that experience with teams and coaches. I am guiding teams and organizations through the... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Fairlie

3:45pm

#StopTheMimimi: from victim to protagonist (Erica Briones Graciano)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
How many times have you left a practical talk thinking "but where I work...". How many times have you waited for the world or your workplace to create the perfect conditions so you could act in accordance to your "principles"?
The reality is, if you need ideal conditions to apply your principles, they aren't principles, they are conveniences. Change happens from inside out, examples speak louder than words, the agile culture fosters protagonists, not victims. If you believe that the agile way is the path to follow, then the question you should ask yourself is: how can I make it happen?
When we think about changing a company it needs to be clear that it is not easy, it is hard work, takes time, some initiatives will go wrong, and the person that took upon themselves the challenge of being a change agent will need lots and lots of resilience. With that in mind, we are going to talk about an approach on how to sell an agile implementation to a company, or superior, that are resistant to the idea, as well as, the downside of the technical profile that we need to be aware and overcome in order to be successful.
Finally we will conclude the session in a much more interactive way, filling a learning canvas with a case from the audience, someone that needs help beginning their agile transformation journey.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Characteristics of the technical profile and the downside of it when navigating political driven environments such as companies;
  • Our own prejudice against "non-agile people" a.k.a management and the importance of understanding their needs and making sure that they are met;
  • How to make an implementation proposal that goes beyond "because I think is so cool to be agile" :) and actually proves that you have something that is feasible and that evenly distribute risks;
  • The importance of being an example of what you believe and would like to implement;
  • A call for reflection and hopefully action. It is too easy to justify inaction due to the circumstances.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Érica Briones Graciano

Érica Briones Graciano

Innovation specialist, Vórtex Inovação
Innovation specialist with 16 years of experience in large and small companies, with national and international teams. Strong advocate of continuous learning through constant feedback loops. I believe in being the change I wish to see in the world.


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Courtland

3:45pm

Leadership is an Extreme Sport (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
“We have diluted the meaning of leadership to such a profound degree that it’s become just another label. But LEADERSHIP is not that easy, so we con ourselves into believing that the WORD is the same as the ACTION.” - Steve Farber
Do you live in a world of empty suits? So called leaders that say one thing and do another?
Do you dream of being a different type of leader? Perhaps a great leader? Perhaps a leader who has an impact on the world?
Are you prepared to take a radical LEAP into a different approach to Leadership?
In this session we will explore the Extreme Leadership Framework from Steve Farber's book The Radical Leap and learn how to put the meaning back into the word leadership. Be prepared to step outside your comfort zone, face your fear and change the world!
Learning Outcomes:
  • A basic understanding of the LEAP framework and why it works.
  • Practice with some techniques that can be applied to take the Radical LEAP.
  • An opportunity to look in the mirror and consider your current leadership style.
  • Start building your plan to change the world.


Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Partner, Context Matters
Em is a Partner at Context Matters, Australia's leading Enterprise Agile consultancy. After close to 20 years in business management roles within multinational blue chip corporations, Em discovered Agile and became passionate about the chance it provides to align business and IT around the delivery of value. In 2012, she launched Australia’s first Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Agile Release Train. The story of the cultural transformation that... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency VII

3:45pm

Accelerate Learning for Individuals, Teams and Organizations with Agile Feedback Systems (Satish Thatte)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are you finding that improvements and learning are difficult for agile initiatives in your organization, and you are struggling to get the expected business benefits from those initiatives?
Learning requires effective dual agile feedback systems at the daily, sprint and release levels. A dual feedback system consists of a primary feedback loop and a derivative feedback loop that provides feedback on feedback. Come to this session to learn how to uncover and avoid agile feedback system dysfunctions in your organization.
Understand how to use simple and very effective visual boards and metrics to improve effectiveness of your agile feedback systems, and thereby, accelerate learning at individual, team and organizational levels, and get business benefits.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how and why weak feedback, delayed feedback, noisy feedback or failure to learn from feedback creates dysfunctional feedback systems in many organizations.
  • Learn how to avoid those dysfunctions in your organization with dual-loop feedback systems consisting of Primary feedback loop and Derivative feedback loop (feedback on feedback).
  • Learn about simple and very practical visual boards and metrics at the daily, sprint and release feedback levels that are well-integrated with Daily Scrums, Sprint Reviews and Sprint Retrospectives, and Release Review and Release Retrospectives
  • Take away very actionable information on how to construct these visual boards and metrics to facilitate collaboration, improvements and learning at all levels: individual, team and organization, and thereby, get business benefits.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Satish Thatte

Satish Thatte

CEO and Agile/Lean Coach, New Synergy Group
Dr. Satish Thatte is an Agile/Lean Coach with over 30 years of industry experience, covering 15 years of software development and management at Texas Instruments, Bellcore and LG Electronics, 7 years as VP of Engineering at several companies practicing agile methods, and 7 years of agile coaching and consulting engagements with over 70 clients. He has worked as Agile/Lean Coach at VersionOne for 4 years and at New Synergy Group for 3 years. He... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Baker

3:45pm

Lightning Talks - People
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Lightning Talks features short high-impact presentations. Check out what's in this session:
  • Coaches Say the Darndest Things - Allison Pollard
  • If practice is on the path to perfection, why only practice agile at work? - Steven Sanchez
  • Scrum Love - Eric Jones
  • 7 Mistakes Leaders Shouldn't Miss - Susan Gibson & Christine Neidhardt
  • Report Metrics or Chew Glass: My Scrummaster Battle - Joe Ryan
  • Extreme Hiring for Agile Teams - Leon Sabarsky
  • Beyond the ceremonies - micro-rituals in the development of team culture - Rebecca Porterfield
  • NPR Hates "Scrum" . . . but let me tell you why - McCaul Baggett
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Lenox

3:45pm

Forecasting Using Data - Quickly answering how big, how long and how likely (Troy Magennis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
This workshops teaches you how to capture data and use it for reliable project forecasting. Much has been written about what is possible to estimate and what is waste. This workshop shows a practical and simple (we are doing it with pen and paper) approach to forecasting without item effort estimation that can be used by anybody needing to answer the questions: How big? How long? and How likely?
Three estimation and forecasting scenarios will be practiced using pen, paper and dice -
  • Reliably capturing and spotting errors in historical data
  • Estimating total project size (story count) by sampling a subset of all features or epics
  • Forecasting completion date using probabilistic forecasting (Monte Carlo) of estimated or measured teams’ throughput (completion rate) or velocity (points)
By participating in this workshop you will –
  • Learn how much sample data is required to undertake a reliable forecast
  • Learn how to spot erroneous data or data that will mislead a forecast
  • Learn how to use story count estimates on a subset of features to forecast a projects combined total story count, or to see if the count you have been given is likely
  • Learn how to use historical data to perform a feature completion date forecast, or to see if the date you have been given is possible.
The processes described involve using dice to simulate uncertainty in projects and building a probabilistic picture of the more likely outcomes (often called Monte Carlo simulation). It is a fast and accurate way to combine historical data into meaningful and verifiable results. By performing a Monte Carlo forecast by hand, you will realize how easy the technique is to perform and not be afraid to use it in your next estimation or forecasting task.
We will also discuss the choice between estimation in points versus throughput and how this impacts forecasting accuracy. We will also discuss how most tools available for forecasting go wrong, and how to understand how accurate your forecast using these methods should be considered.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how much sample data is required to undertake a reliable forecast
  • Learn how to spot erroneous data or data that will mislead a forecast
  • Learn how to use story count estimates on a subset of features to forecast a projects combined total story count, or to see if the count you have been given is likely
  • Learn how to use historical data to perform a feature completion date forecast, or to see if the date you have been given is possible.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Magennis

Troy Magennis

Focused Objective LLC
Troy is an experienced IT executive who has been involved in many leading software organizations over 20 years. Most recently, Troy founded Focused Objective to build and promote risk management tools that simulate and forecast software development projects and portfolios. Technology has always been a passion for Troy. After cutting his teeth on early 8-bit personal computers, Troy moved into electronic engineering, which later led to positions... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Centennial 4

3:45pm

Just Enough: Minimally Viable Agile (Troy Tuttle)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Have some of your Agile practices become stale or redundant? Does it feel like your teams are just going through the motions?
In Lean product development, the minimum viable product or MVP, is a strategy to avoid building products that customers don’t need or want by maximizing our learning of what is valuable to the customer.
Agile is typically learned through exposure to a series of Agile practices, a recipe of sorts. But what if that recipe goes beyond minimal?
This session will question the thinking behind some of the industry’s accepted Agile practices around sprint planning, release planning, and even popular estimation techniques. We will try to identify what is truly needed to be Agile, based on needs instead of prescribed recipes. What is minimally sufficient to start realizing the benefits of Agile at the team and portfolio levels?
Learning Outcomes:
  • The nature of knowledge work is non-deterministic, therefore, our success with Agile depends on establishing activities and methods, at the team and portfolio levels, that leverage this nature.
  • Traditional project tools (some from 1st generation Agile), do not provide actionable information. Rich visualizations, and flow based metrics, provide actionable information to better manage value delivery.
  • To avoid the dysfunction of Cargo Cult Agile, we have to understand the “why” of Agile.
  • A Minimal Viable approach requires us shape our activities, methods, and approaches based on needs, not recipes.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Troy Tuttle

Troy Tuttle

Lean-Agile Coach, KanFlow
Troy Tuttle is a Lean-Agile coach and consultant with a decade of experience working in Lean-Agile environments. He currently operates KanFlow, a consulting firm dedicated to helping software professionals, teams, and organizations improve by the study and application of Lean and Agile principles and practices. Most of his work is directed by approaches that support better clarity, understanding, and continuous learning about Lean, Agile, and the... Read More →



Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover FG

3:45pm

Agile Testing Maturity – What does “Good” Look Like? (Bob Galen)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
One of the challenges in agile contexts is finding your way towards mature and effective testing practices. You could argue that we were better off pre-agile, in that the landscape was clearer. Point being – agile contexts are a bit of a floating target across a wide range of testing approaches and techniques.
We developed the 3-Pillars framework with just this challenge in mind, trying to craft a model to guide us (teams and organizations) towards more mature agile practices. And the focus isn’t simply on “QA team”, but more broadly across the entire organization.
In this workshop we’ll “dust off” the 3-Pillars assessment tool and walk you through assessing your current state of agile testing. Don’t get hung up on the word maturity, but more so focus on leveraging the tool to guide your continuous improvement efforts. You’ll leave with a great view to your testing balance and a game plan for your context-based improvements.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Introduction to the 3-Pillars agile quality & testing framework
  • How to apply the framework to attendee contexts – generating strategies, roadmaps, and continuous improvement action plans
  • How to communicate your intentions and progress for ongoing improvement efforts
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bob Galen

Bob Galen

Principle Agile Coach, Velocity Partners
Agile Evangelist & Coach – Velocity Partners - Bob Galen is an Agile Methodologist, Practitioner & Coach based in Cary, NC. In this role he helps guide companies and teams in their pragmatic adoption and organizational shift towards Scrum and other agile methodologies and practices. He is a Principal Agile Evangelist at Velocity Partners, a leading agile nearshore development partner. He is also President and Agile Trainer & Coach at... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover C

3:45pm

You Can’t Fix What You Can’t See: Visualizations that Spark Conversation and Change (David Hussman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Many teams and programs successfully using agile methods know that a picture truly is worth a thousand words. Many problems and opportunities are easily surfaced by applying technology to answer thoughtful questions. In this session, a group of experienced practitioners working in large, complex eco-systems will share their visualization inventions and experiences. Each person will take a turn talking about one or more visualizations, sharing what sparked the idea, how it was created and the impact it had on the team, program or organization. After a short presentation, the group will ask questions and discuss the visualization in a fishbowl format. The visualizations will range in area, covering code complexity, team dynamics, product discovery, organizational learning and more. At various times during the session, the audience will be able to pose questions to one or more of the practitioners leading the session.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - See examples of real world visualizations
  • - Learn how to frame needs / ideas for visualizations
  • - Understand that visualization can aid learning in many areas: tech, product, organization, etc
  • - See tools and tech used to create visualization
  • - Challenge audience to question their engagement and use or visualizations


Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
I split my time between leading DevJam and coaching at client sites. My coaching ranges from small teams to large enterprises and entails working with teams, programs and leadership groups. Some days I am doing discovery work, teaching product thinking and agile design and augmenting real agility with user centered design and user experience tools. Other days I am deep in the delivery space helping teams adapt agile methods to meet their needs... Read More →


Monday July 25, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Learning Center

4:30pm

Scaling Without Frameworks - Ultimate Software Experience Report (Prateek Singh, Daniel Vacanti)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Ultimate Software is a leading provider of Global HR and Payroll software. Ultimate has been on “Fortune’s 25 Best Companies to Work For” list for the past 5 years and was named “#1 Best Company to Work For in Tech” this year. There's a reason for these accolades--not least of which is Ultimate's success with Agile practices. This experience report details the large at-scale adoption of Kanban at Ultimate Software and the successful results it has produced. We will detail the principles, processes and practices that were rolled out to 25 teams totaling more than 350 developers and how the teams were able to improve both predictability and productivity by applying these principles.
Ultimate first entered the world of Agile practices in 2005 with the adoption of Scrum to mixed results. In 2008 Ultimate started experimenting with Kanban by applying it to one small team first and then slowly rolling it out to all teams in the development organization. Following simple basic principles, teams evolved their own processes to best suit their business and achieve a high degree of operational efficiency, transparency, and predictability. Team commitments have become more accurate, user story throughput has increased by 150%, the number of features delivered has increased by 190%, and user story Cycle Times have decreased by over 50%.
In the early days of Ultimate's Agile adoption, Product and Development management only committed to 50% of the team’s capacity. This was due to instability in prioritization and the team’s inability to estimate work reliably. The development teams looked to Kanban and just in time commitments as the resolution to these problems. By operating stable systems and having a steady throughput, the teams were able to achieve a high degree of predictability when it came to delivering features.
This talk with outline Ultimate's journey through Agile and success with Kanban. We will highlight the things that made us successful and offer up some lessons learned. Come and here about a success story from one of the industry's most respected companies.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • This case study should act as a guide to implementing and evolving agile processes whether at scale or at the level of a small team. It will be able to demonstrate how teams and organizations can identify inefficiencies in their processes and eliminate waste to run a leaner, more predictable and more profitable organization. The study will not just talk about what Ultimate Software learned, but also how we learned it, so that the methods can be applied in the context of most development organizations.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Prateek Singh

Prateek Singh

Manager of Software Engineering, Ultimate Software
Prateek has been leading and working on agile teams for the past 10 years. Starting with XP, then Scrum and now working in a Kanban system, Prateek has gained a breadth and depth of knowledge regarding agile techniques, practices and implementation principles. Prateek is currently involved in conducting training and coaching for teams regarding Kanban and Lean principles at Ultimate Software. Prateek has played the role of Software Engineer... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Vacanti

Daniel Vacanti

CEO, ActionableAgile
Lean-Agile metrics and forecasting | Anything Kanban related


Monday July 25, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Kennesaw

7:00pm

Ice Breaker Reception
Join us for Agile2016's Opening Night reception. The evening will be filled with food, drink, live entertainment and games! Mix and mingle, chat with new Attendees, reconnect with old friends, and be sure to check out the Sponsor booths to see what's new and exciting in the industry.

Monday July 25, 2016 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Grand Hall
 
Tuesday, July 26
 

8:30am

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss? Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment. We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join!

Tuesday July 26, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Grand Hall Foyer

9:00am

Swarm – Beyond Pair, Beyond Scrum (Danijel Arsenovski)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
A single keyboard and screen can turn teams into a highly cooperative, productive units versed in collaborative learning and problem solving. Collaboration and cooperation emerges in environments that foster such culture.
A common stereotype for anyone involved in software development is of socially inept and reclusive introvert, who prefers communicating to computers over talking to people and is generally highly accomplished in his work.
However, with the advent of agile, a great emphasis is put to communication and collaboration. Until recently shunned specialist is now expect to behave as a multi-skilled team member that is adept in communicating with multiple stakeholders and fares well as a part of highly collaborative multi-functional team.
This report focuses on a year-long experience of working in a highly-collaborative environment with team members practicing mob programming most of the time, performing almost no estimates, interacting frequently with business stakeholders, under no traditionally defined roles while focusing on delivering value. This is a story of how high performing autonomous team emerges in an environment that promotes interaction and collaboration.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Understand dynamics of autonomous,high performing swarm team and how it it different from typical scrum and agile teams.
  • Understand how limiting WIP to 1 for a whole team and using mob programming can trigger a profound change in team performance.
  • Will see one realistic scenario where team is not estimating the work.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Danijel Arsenovski

Danijel Arsenovski

Agile Coach, SolutionsIQ


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 9:30am
Kennesaw

9:00am

Introduction to Agile Development Practice Basics for Everyone (not just Developers) (Tim Ottinger)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Tim (and his imaginary friend Floyd) take us on a tour of "how agile works."
Everyone in your project can understand the agile practices, not just the programmers!
This session goes behind the mechanics of agile processes, and mechanics of agile practices, to dig into the reasons we do the things we do.
Learn the reasons behind the ceremonies, practices, and measures.
How does your "agile" measure up?
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand why we use agile practices, in terms that work not only for developers, but for anyone who might be the member of an agile team -- with a few tips along the way for those who are required to either lead volunteers or get children to do chores.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tim Ottinger

Tim Ottinger

Sr. Consultant, Industrial Logic
Software development as a thinking art | Transitioning to Agile from Whatever | Programming Languages | Microhabits | Refactoring, TDD, Programming, Testing, Managing | Flying drones for fun | NOT POLITICS NOR SPORTS. I'm not qualified.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Hanover AB

9:00am

Agilists as Agents of Social Evolution: Our Calling and Our Responsibility-Première Partie (Lyssa Adkins)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Until recently, common wisdom held that humans stopped developing by their mid 20s. Whatever they were then is what they were going to be for the rest of their lives. In our own experiences as Agilists, we see the folly in this as we witness adults of all ages change to embrace agile as a way of thriving in a complex and confounding world. Our experience is supported by researchers who tell us that humans can develop throughout their lives. Instead of outward development, though, it's inner development; specifically one's mental complexity. They also tell us that although people can develop, there is no guarantee it will happen. Plenty of people stop.
At the same time, Agile has crossed the chasm and we see organizations of all sizes doing Agile -- kind of. Even the "doing" Agile part is not so healthy everywhere, never mind the "being" Agile part. The reality is just not as great as we Agilists imagined it would be. Is there a link between the two? Perhaps Agile requires a certain level of cognitive development to do well. If so, it's possible that we Agilists are bringing our way of working to corporate environments that are not developed to the necessary level. When we do this, are we agents of evolution? Specifically placed to aid the next unavoidable step in the unfolding of human development? Or, are we well-meaning zealots doing more harm than good? These are some of the questions we will consider as we look at our calling as Agilists and the moral responsibility that comes with it.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Spring

9:00am

Outcome Oriented Agility: Transformations that work with, rather than against, cultures (Jay Packlick)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
In Greek mythology, Procrustes stretched or amputated the limbs of any poor passerby who failed to fit his iron bed exactly. None fit! Blaming the difficulty of implementing agile on culture is a lot like blaming those poor travelers for being too tall or too short. Culture isn’t the enemy of change; frameworks and models of transformation that don’t fit are.
There's a better way. Outcome Oriented Agility (OOA) is an approach to agile transformation that shifts the focus away from events, roles, and artifacts toward achieving results that matter most to the organization. Drawing from the iterative approach to achieving goals perfected by Toyota, the Toyota Kata, OOA offers a path to agility that works with, rather than against, the grain of a culture. The result is a far more rapid rate of improvement and a flavor of agility custom crafted to fit the needs and personality of the organization.
You'll learn:
  • The Procrustean fallacy: why culture isn't the enemy and why 'culture change' is often a fool's errand.
  • How to harness Wildly Important Goals ( WIGs) and the Toyota Kata to motivate, implement, and sustain durable improvements.
  • How to use outcome mapping; a simple technique to help teams identify and prioritize outcomes that matter.
Moreover, you'll learn how to clearly and unambiguously demonstrate the value the transformation is bringing to the organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will leave with the knowledge needed to:
  • Explain what Outcome Oriented Agility is and how they can use it in their transformations
  • Explain how to use 'Wildly Important Goals' (WIGs) and the Toyota Kata to create the conditions for successful transformations
  • Facilitate Outcome Mapping workshops; a simple technique analogous to story mapping that reveals the outcomes that underly roles, events, and artifacts
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jay Packlick

Jay Packlick

Principal / Enterprise Agile Coach, Sabre
Jay spent the first twenty years of his career getting software done in a variety of roles. Excited by how much better everything was using Extreme Programming in 2001, he’s dedicated the last twelve years of his career to learning and helping others implement better ways of getting stuff done. Currently an Enterprise Agile coach at Sabre, Jay uses an Integral approach to working with organizations to foster learning, increase agility at scale... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Hanover FG

9:00am

Question Storming: A Technique to Storm Your Way to Better Understanding & Success (Manjit Singh)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Discover the technique to ask the questions to make breakthrough differences in decision-making, problem-solving, innovation & culture. Typically, questions open thinking, while answers often close down thinking. Question Storming is a tool for moving beyond limitations in perception and thinking and advancing to novel and extraordinary solutions and answers.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn Question Thinking (QT) methods and tools while applying them to a current relevant challenge or goal for new thinking and new possibilities.
  • Learn how to apply QT methods to catalyze deeper effectiveness with current organizational initiatives including leadership, management, and team development and effectiveness as well as coaching, lean thinking, and operational excellence.
  • Discover how QT aligns with and empowers the results of Appreciative Inquiry, Action Learning, and Learning Organizations.


Speakers
avatar for Manjit Singh

Manjit Singh

President, Agilious LLC
Manijt Singh is the founder of Agilious LLC, a boutique agile consultancy providing agile coaching, agile training and agile based product development. As an agile consultant, Manjit helps create high performing teams across a client’s enterprise, which deliver high value products that maximize competitive advantage based on Agile-Lean principles. He drives Agile adoption through training, mentoring, and coaching of team members and... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Fairlie

9:00am

Design your Agile Organization using SOA (Service-Oriented Architecture) principles (Catherine Louis, Raj Mudhar)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Services-Oriented Architecture (SOA) provides principles for designing software applications as suites of independently deployable services with a bare minimum of centralized management of these services. Benefits of SOA include the ability to learn/combine/grow/deliver these services to please customers, anticipating failures and handling change.
If your organization struggles to deliver fast across multiple teams, fails to anticipate failure or handle rapid change, the 14 principles behind Services Oriented Architecture (SOA) applied to organizations offer a solution. We call this Service Oriented Teams (SOT).
In this session we will learn the benefits of modeling your organization in Services Oriented Teams (SOT). This includes improved information flow, ability to expose internal functionality, organizational flexibility, service re-use, lower development and management costs, configuration flexibility. We will do this by applying SOA principles and methods to Agile teams in an all-hands-on-deck workshop, using LEGO®’s as team modeling tools, and SOA methods as teams’ interfaces.
Learning Outcomes:
  • In this hands-on workshop, you’ll learn:
  • - an introduction to Services Oriented Architecture and how applying this to organizational design helps to promote high performing, learning and highly effective teams
  • - how SOTs operate as self-orchestrated ecosystems of teams that are, in fact, Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS)
  • the benefits of modeling organizational structure to influence the architectural direction of your product (Conway’s law)
  • - why SOA principles are as relevant for teams as they are for software architecture
  • - how to design organizations to maximize flow of product - with fewer handoffs and better communication
  • - why change management is no longer needed with teams’ ability to adapt “baked in” to the organization
  • - how to define smart team interfaces to accelerate independent delivery
  • - how SOT teams can configure/reconfigure so that other teams are not impacted
  • - how to build teams to promote knowledge, knowledge reuse, and growth
  • - how to focus on the bare minimum of centralized management of SOT.
  • - how investing, nurturing, developing high performing teams is mandatory
  • - when standard patterns for org design should be broken to remove bottlenecks
  • - the benefit of avoiding Conway law silos by organizing teams in service oriented teams responsible for development and delivery
Attachments:

Speakers
CL

Catherine Louis

cll group
Looking forward to producing the most awesome stage, "Working With Customers" thanks to our great review team and Shane Hastie!
RM

Raj Mudhar

Deloitte Canada


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Hanover DE

9:00am

Escape a collapsing Temple and learn about Agile team dynamics (Martin Heider)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you want to experience and observe the dynamics of an Agile Team? Do you accept the challenge to escape a collapsing temple? This session runs two iterations with the affordable collaborative game “Escape” for providing the opportunity to experience team dynamics from different perspectives as team member and observer. In two iterations all teams work for themselves and try to escape a collapsing temple. Each round is followed by a reflection, in which team members and observers discuss and learn about the recognized behaviors and how to improve the next round. It’s a great simulation for teams starting with Agile in order to experience and reflect the probable team dynamics within ten minutes. And it's a fun and energizing format, which is well suited for team liftoffs and retrospectives.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Effects of distance on the effectiveness of team communication
  • Positive and bad impact of time pressure
  • Realizing the power of observing, listening and reflecting
  • Experience the difference of being within a team or its observer
  • Get an affordable collaborative game that can be used to simulate and reflect on Agile Team Dynamics
  • Workshop format that can be used in team liftoffs and retrospectives
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martin Heider

Martin Heider

Owner, infomar software
With 20 years of professional IT background I’m coaching projects, teams and companies to improve their way of working since eight years. I create waves to push my clients and colleagues out of their box in order to help them to get better. Doing this I try to keep the balance between avoiding to overwhelm and striving for excellence. Besides working as coach, consultant and trainer I’m organizing Agile Tracks on conferences, I’m one of the... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Regency VI

9:00am

The Technical Debt Trap (Doc Norton)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Technical Debt has become a catch-all phrase for any code that needs to be re-worked. Much like Refactoring has become a catch-all phrase for any activity that involves changing code. These fundamental misunderstandings and comfortable yet mis-applied metaphors have resulted in a plethora of poor decisions. What is technical debt? What is not technical debt? Why should we care? What is the cost of misunderstanding? What do we do about it? Doc discusses the origins of the metaphor, what it means today, and how we properly identify and manage technical debt.
Learning Outcomes:
  • History of the Technical Debt Metaphor
  • Challenges with the current common understanding
  • Why what you call “debt” is probably better described as “cruft”
  • How to manage cruft (debt)


Speakers
avatar for Doc Norton

Doc Norton

CEO, CTO2
Doc is passionate about working with teams to improve delivery and building great organizations. Once a dedicated code slinger, Doc has turned his energy toward helping teams, departments, and companies work better together in the pursuit of better software. Working with a wide range of companies such as Groupon, Nationwide Insurance, Belly, and many others, Doc has applied tenants of agile, lean, systems thinking, and servant leadership to... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Courtland

9:00am

Measuring DevOps: the Key Metrics that Matter (Anders Wallgren)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
How is your DevOps transformation coming along?
How do you measure Agility? Reliability? Efficiency? Quality? Culture? Success?!
How do you optimize your software delivery processes?
You can’t improve what you cannot measure. But are you measuring the right things? Are you measuring too little (or too late), or are you drowning in disparate data points that make it hard for you to get to the bottom line: where should you be focusing on next as you optimize your process?
Having the right goals, asking the right questions and learning by doing are paramount to achieving success with DevOps. Having specific milestones and shared KPIs play a critical role in guiding your DevOps adoption and lead to continuous improvement - towards realizing true agility, improved quality, and faster time to market throughout your organization.
This session will walk you through a practical framework for implementing measurement and tracking of your DevOps efforts and software delivery performance that will provide you with data you can act on!
These KPIs include metrics related to your software delivery pipeline and technical progress, as well as cultural indicators and business impact. In addition, we will cover common use cases and real world examples for implementing these metrics to drive DevOps success, as well as best practices for how to address certain challenges and problematic areas along your process that these metrics may bring to light.
Learning Outcomes:
  • In this session, you will learn:
  • 1. What are some best practices for identifying the metrics you should be tracking to assess your current state of delivery success, your key bottlenecks and your maturity level on your DevOps journey.
  • 2. How do you track your performance along your software delivery pipeline, as well as gauge your cultural evolution and team dynamics
  • 3. How to identify the key metrics that matter for the different stakeholders and for the different stages throughout your software delivery pipeline
  • 4. What are some examples and best practices for converging specific data points to organizational-level KPIs that are agreed upon by all stakeholders, and provide a barometer to guide your on-going optimization?
  • 5. If your KPIs speak to a possible problem area: what are some common use cases and real world examples for what you should be looking into as you try to alleviate a possible bottleneck or inefficiency.
  • 6. How to automate metrics collection and analysis
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lisa	Calkins

Lisa Calkins

CSO, Exadel
Lisa Calkins is CSO of Exadel, a global software engineering company that offers custom development services to enterprise clients. Lisa brings with her over 20 years of experience in software development and consulting. Prior to Exadel, Lisa was CEO and co-founder of Amadeus Consulting, one of the nation’s leading software consulting companies, where she helped drive the success of hundreds of development projects... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Baker

9:00am

A Principles Based Approach to Scaling Agile (Peter Green, Peter Saddington MDiv, CST)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
If you're looking at Scaling sessions, you're probably in one of four categories: 1) You are using a scaling framework and want to make it work better, 2) You are evaluating various scaling frameworks and struggling to pick the one that will work best in your organization, 3) You want to "roll your own" scaling framework that is custom fit for your organization, and want to make sure that you create something that will lead to a truly Agile Organization, or 4) You want to "scale agile" outside of just the IT/development group in your organization.
While the idea of taking something that works really well at the team level and scaling it up seems logical, the core characteristics of successful teams are really hard to duplicate outside of a small number of people. In addition, this type of fractal approach is just one of several possible scenarios for scaling. This has resulted in scaling approaches that assume trust, accountability, and transparency of information without putting effective systems and structures in place to achieve those characteristics at the organizational level.
In this workshop, we'll share a set of principles that we've discovered from our years of working with organizations of all types (including non-software) to help them become Agile Organizations at scale. These principles can be applied to any scaling framework, they are agnostic in nature in order to be useful in helping you: 1) Strengthen the effectiveness and agility of your chosen scaling framework, 2) Select a scaling framework that will best fit your organizational context, 3) Focus on the most important considerations if you are "rolling your own" scaling approach, and 4) Scale Agile thinking and approaches beyond development and IT.
Our principles based approach examines what Agile Organizations do to achieve those same benefits beyond just scaling to more agile teams working on projects, programs or portfolios. The principles can be used to achieve true Organizational Agility, which is necessary to remain competitive and make a difference in the 21st century.
Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Draw and describe the four common types of scaling.
  • 2. Describe how complexity makes the Agile Values harder to achieve.
  • 3. Describe the key principles that lead to an organization's capability to rapidly respond to change.
  • 4. Evaluate various "off the shelf" scaling approaches for their alignment with organization-wide agility.
Attachments:


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Centennial 1

9:00am

Super Product Ownership - Creating and Scaling Product Ownership in the Federal Government (Richard Cheng, Bridget Dongarra)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
USA Staffing is the U.S. Office of Personnel Management's hiring software solution for Federal agencies.
USA Staffing positions agencies to acquire, assess, certify, select, and onboard qualified candidates precisely, efficiently and cost-effectively. It provides the up-to-date tools agencies need for strengthening the foundation of great government - your workforce. Created by OPM and based on the experience of more than 50 Federal agencies, USA Staffing is an off-the-shelf software solution for automating staffing and assessment. It combines core and advanced features in a user-friendly, web-enabled software solution. USA Staffing is compliant with Federal hiring regulations and meets Federal Information Technology (IT) security requirements.
http://www.opm.gov/services-for-agencies/technology-systems/usa-staffing/
As the program that addresses the hiring of nearly all Federal employees, the USA Staffing program in a major program in the US Federal government. Starting with one Scrum team in August of 2012 to using Agile across all the program teams, the USA Staffing program is committed to Agile concepts and methods as it rebuilds and updates the USA Staffing IT systems.
In looking at key lessons learned during this transformation, one of the keys was creating strong Product Ownership on the USA Staffing program. In Federal programs, Federal Product Ownership is often underserved, but with the USA Staffing program, there was a concentrated focus on ensuring effective Federal product ownership. This includes:
1. creating effective Product Owners for individual Scrum teams
2. creating a Product Ownership team with a Super Product Owner
By doing the above, it allowed the USA Staffing program to:
1. Create great collaborative working relationships with the USA Staffing stakeholders and customers
2. Enable a collaborative and self organizing culture across the distributed teams on the USA Staffing program
3. Allow USA Staffing to scale its program across all the Scrum teams in its program.
Through lecture, group discussions and Q&A, this session will offer practical techniques for cultivating Product Ownership within Agile work environment in government when teams are organizationally and geographically separated. We will also detail how we worked with customer and stakeholder organizations to help them adapt to a rapid development cycle.
This session is presented by Bridget Dongarra, a Federal employee and Product Owner on the USA Staffing program and by Richard Cheng, an Agile coach and Trainer. Bridget will bring the Federal perspective into the session while Richard will help address Agile specific nuances in the Agile @ OPM implementation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the need for Federal Product Ownership
  • Understanding the difference between Product Ownership and Project Management
  • Understanding how to develop Federal Product Owners and Ownership on Federal programs
  • Understanding how to scale Federal Product Ownership
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Richard Cheng

Richard Cheng

Principal Consultant, Excella Consulting
Richard Cheng is a Principal consultant at Excella Consulting, providing consulting services to commercial and Federal clients in the Washington, DC area. Richard trains, coaches, and mentors clients in understanding and implementing Agile and Scrum. Richard also leads Excella's Training business. A graduate of Virginia Tech, Richard has authored several publications on project management, presented at Agile and PMI sponsored industry events... Read More →
avatar for Bridget Dongarra

Bridget Dongarra

Supervisory Program Analyst, US Office of Personnel Management
I work for the US Office of Personnel Management. Talk to me about Agile in Government, Product Ownership, Agile Program Management, and HR. We manage a hiring software program (by Government, for Government!) that handles the majority of Federal Civilian hiring - and we're Agile!


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Piedmont

9:00am

Expect-Engage-React: Simple Steps for Leading Great Teams (Jeffrey Davidson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The world and your organization is transforming, filled with challenge and opportunity. You know the best way to change the world for better is with a great team. Now you want build a group of talented individuals into that high-performing, world-changing team. But how? Certainly we have all have more bad boss examples than good role models.
Join your fellow leaders as we discuss bad management patterns and lessons I slowly learned from years of management and team coaching. We will cover jargon-free principles and guidelines you can use to help your teams become productive. These techniques include: high standards, higher expectations, enforced participation, encouraged collaboration, freedom of choice, and super-frequent feedback.
Come and learn about an adaptive, Agile-friendly leadership model that helps you fulfill your purpose.
Learning Outcomes:
  • You will author a tweet-sized vision statement for your team.
  • You will draw connections between vision statement, key principles, and activities.
  • You will leave with defined activities you can apply upon returning to work.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Davidson

Jeffrey Davidson

Principal, Leading Great Teams
Jeffrey Davidson helps teams uncover their greatness. It’s there already, but too often hiding. Using a combination of stories, engagement, and activities, Jeffrey lays the groundwork for lasting change in leaders and teams; building models of execution and cooperation, guiding world-class teams into the #futureofwork.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Regency V

9:00am

Humor Trumps All: How fun improves learning (Tamsen Mitchell)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Stop slogging through sterile and boring training!
There is a place for humor. There is scientific proof that humor moves information from short term to long term memory - a fact useful in converting training and presentations into engaging, memorable and retainable experiences. With an agile practice, we must constantly learn -- let’s make it fun!
This session won’t turn you into Jerry Seinfield or Amy Schumer, nor is it intended to advocate that your presentations should be a stand up routine. This session will introduce accessible techniques you can use to bring any training or presentation to life. These techniques have a basis in cognitive neuroscience and academic research.
This workshop introduces and reviews the The 6 Trumps ® - six learning principles based on scientific prinicples that can be used in any type of training. It explores how the brain learns and how information converts from short to long term memory. Finally, it synthesizes these foundations and builds a new common thread: Humor Trumps All!
Participants will acquire a strong understanding of the importance of humor and fun in training, and how, even if they don’t think they are funny, they can introduce these attributes to develop improved content and engagement techniques. Ultimately leading the attendees towards making more memorable and impactful agile learning.
“The Human Race only has 1 truly effective weapon, and that is Laughter” - Mark Twain
Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain the importance of incorporating fun in training.
  • Demonstrate that learning need not be a chore.
  • List 7 specific ways to make training more effective.
  • Understand some applications of basic modern cognitive science in the context of training and learning.
  • Convey how fun can be used to support these learning outcomes.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Tamsen Mitchell

Tamsen Mitchell

Agile Coach, Salesforce
Tamsen was worked at a bunch of companies for a number of years - but that's a BLAH speaker profile. | | More importantly, she has fun doing it. With a background in architecture, followed by video games and then Pixar. She's always been around strong creative, storytelling based environments where thinking outside the box was nurtured. | She's passionate about continuous improvement, and how to facilitate that curiosity in others. She... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Regency VII

9:00am

Connecting the Dots : Linking Agile Strategy to Execution (Gail Ferreira, Alan Leeds)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
"We have an awesome strategic plan….so why can’t our people just execute it?”
Study after study has demonstrated that even well-defined strategies are only understood and executed in organizations between 10-25% of the time.
One barrier has been a lack of a real-time method for managers of an organization or chain of suppliers to view and update their strategic and operational plans, tactics and results.
In this presentation, we will review the tactics and strategies for merging agile strategies to create portfolios, programs and projects. Additionally, we will offer interactive exercises that will help participants visualize how they can use these tactics in their organization. Hands on exercises will commence with a self rating of participants company maturity using the Agile SIMM, rating and ranking of portfolio initiatives using agile sizing methods, and discussions regarding how to link and integrate agile strategy to project execution framework.
Topics will include various methodologies and tools that can be used to create and execute an awesome agile strategic plan:
  • Discussion surrounding the use of lean methodologies for strategic management
  • Discussion surrounding use of the CUE model for strategic management (Consolidate Activities, Use Lean Metrics that Matter, Eliminate Waste)
  • Discussion surrounding the definition and myths of Agile Strategy Execution: the 3 A’s: Agile, Adaptive and Aligned
  • Interactive activity using a simplified Agile Strategy Maturity Model (Agile SIMM)
  • Strategy execution methodologies: Review 3 leading strategy execution methodologies with real world case studies (Intel/Google): Hoshin Kanri, Objectives, Goals, Strategies, Measures (OGSM), Objectives and Key Results (OKR)
  • Obstacles of strategy execution based on prior research
  • Present an agile strategy to project execution framework that includes the following: Strategy to initiatives, Initiative ranking, Project/portfolio ranking, Integrated cadence of review meetings
  • Case studies and demonstration of an agile strategy execution software (ASE) to integrate, align and manage all strategic, tactical and performance information including goals, objectives, metrics, initiatives, tactics and projects.
  • Final class discussions that will empower the audience to assess the current level of agile strategy using the agile strategy maturity model (SIMM) and begin to build strategic plans that can be used in their organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn about the definition myths and requirements of Agile Strategy Execution
  • Measure agile maturity using the agile strategy maturity model (SIMM)
  • Understand obstacles to strategic execution based on prior research
  • Discuss the connection between strategy and execution for agile programs, projects and tactics
  • Demonstrate a new Agile Strategy Execution Framework and tools
  • Discuss how this model will connect the dots between your Strategy needs and execution


Speakers
avatar for Gail Ferreira

Gail Ferreira

Agile Practice Leader & Coach, MATRIX
Gail is an accomplished agile coach, award winning author, speaker, trainer and practice leader with 20+ years of deep experience in lean and agile methodologies and consulting. She utilizes this experience to help organizations realize maximum value on their investments by leveraging agile methods and practices for product development. Gail's expertise is in guiding enterprise transition and implementation of agile values, principles and... Read More →
avatar for Alan Leeds

Alan Leeds

President, Y-Change Inc.
Alan Leeds is the president of Y-Change, Inc., an agile strategy execution software company that enables companies such as Abbott Labs, Cisco Systems, and Great River Energy to convert strategy into action. | | Alan’s experiences in consulting provided the foundation for the methodology upon which Y-Change is based; successful deployment of a company’s goals and objectives occurs when the strategy is cascaded throughout the company. He... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Dunwoody

9:00am

Jim Newkirk's Stalwarts Session (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
**
Learning Outcomes:
  • **


Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Inman

9:00am

Test Automation: Agile Enablement for Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence Teams (Lynn Winterboer, Cher Fox)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Regardless of whether your data warehousing (DW)/business intelligence (BI) team is dedicated to Scrum, a fan of Kanban, or focused on XP, “Agile” in any form calls for small increments of potentially deployable results – which means that QA is essential on a regular, frequent basis. As we develop these small increments, we need to not only test the new development, but also regression test what we’ve already built. Our test suite grows larger with each iteration, and manual testing quickly becomes infeasible. Agile requires that we automate our tests so that regression testing doesn’t become a development bottleneck.
Test automation is one of several key technical enablement practices that allows teams to be more successful in their agile journeys. While there are lots of test practices and automation tools out there for software development teams to leverage, very few are targeted to data-related development and testing. Agile analytics practitioner Lynn Winterboer and DW/BI architect and developer Cher Fox will share essential agile test foundations and data-focused test automation technologies to help data warehousing and business intelligence teams get a leg up on this important agile practice, including a demo of how this works!
Agenda:
  • Why is test automation important for agile DW/BI teams?
  • Why aren’t all DW/BI teams automating their tests today?
  • What is the path to data-focused test automation?
  • Where to start? What tests to automate first?
  • Demo of a simple test automation tool any DW/BI team could build and use
Learning Outcomes:
  • The intent of this presentation is to:
  • 1) Educate DW/BI folks on why test automation is important to an agile journey;
  • 2) Clarify that a solid foundation is needed in testing practices and principles before automation is useful;
  • 3) Show that automation is easy to do, using simple DW/BI tools and coding languages.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Cher Fox

Cher Fox

Principal DW/BI Solution Architect, Fox Consulting
I am passionate about improving performance & quality in DW/BI processes, automating “spreadsheet madness” & time consuming manual processes, reverse engineering reporting challenges to improve data quality, reliability & scalability, & improving management decisioning & operations efficiency overall. I enjoy advising on & participating in the development of DW/BI/SW projects in various roles in all stages of the SDLC. As a jack of many... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Winterboer

Lynn Winterboer

Agile Analytics Trainer & Coach, Winterboer Agile Analytics
I teach and coach DW/BI teams on how to effectively apply agile principles and practices to their work. I also enjoy practicing what I teach by participating as an active agile team member for clients. My career has focused on Agile and BI, serving in various roles within both professions. I understand the unique set of challenges faced by DW/BI teams who want to benefit from the incremental, value-focused approaches of Agile and Lean... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Lenox

9:00am

Future Technologies or The Automated Startup Robot (Andreas Schliep, Peter Beck)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Not too many years from now, fully autonomous business stakeholder systems will automatically create thousands or millions of arbitrarily different micro-startups, tracking their struggle for success, mercilessly eliminating the less fit for survival ventures, powering up and growing the winners. The financial sectors are fully automated because human beings no longer could deal with the complexity.
Developers will pair-program with their computers, discussing concepts and meat-space constraints with constantly learning coder-code systems. The word "application" will no longer mean "program" or "software", but a general approach to use combined calculating power of people and machines. People do not need "How-tos", but machines do.
What else might happen in the next 5-50 years? Let's explore the ideas and concepts on a futurespective timeline. After building the timeline, it becomes really interesting. What will we do to foster or block these developments or events? Where do we see our role? How might we feel about this?
By using retrospective techniques on a future prognosis, we will not only explore a different use of these techniques, but also gather some insights about our influence on things to come, maybe the source of creativity.
Learning Outcomes:
  • • Futurespective timeline
  • • Mining the timeline
  • • Circles of Influence for expected events
  • • Creativity as a means to prepare for a desired future outcome
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andreas Schliep

Andreas Schliep

Executive Partner, DasScrumTeam AG
Andreas Schliep is a founding member and executive partner of DasScrumTeam. He is a Scrum coach and trainer. He studied at the technical university of Bremerhaven, and worked as a software developer, project manager, team lead and group lead. Andreas has worked with Scrum since 2003. He became a full-time Scrummer in 2006. Since then, he has helped to introduce and improve Scrum and agile practices in numerous companies all over the world. His... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Learning Center

9:00am

Introduction to Assumptions Mapping (David Bland)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
LeanUX is bridging the gap between Design Thinking and Agile. While teams are embracing experimentation, it is important that your teams don't waste all of their time running experiments on unimportant + known aspects of your product. Assumptions Mapping is a LeanUX exercise that gives you the power to facilitate a conversation with your team and enable them to focus on what matters. If you find yourself in an organization trying to adapt to conditions of extreme uncertainty, this workshop gives you actionable tools and advice that you can take back to your teams and apply right away.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to use Assumptions Mapping to illustrate risk & focus your experimentation
  • How LeanUX is bridging the gap between Design Thinking and Agile
  • What leadership and facilitation styles you'll need for LeanUX to thrive in your organization
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Hanover C

9:00am

#DiscoveryDojo: Hunting Value with Structured Conversations (Ellen Gottesdiener, Steve Holyer)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As a Product Owner, you get better outcomes when you collaborate with a wide range of stakeholders to transparently discover the value your product can deliver. This helps you make the best decisions and build healthy teams. As a Product Owner, you also know this essential discovery work helps your team stay focused, engaged, and motivated.
Are you seeking ways to efficiently and effectively converse about your product requirements? Then join us for the #DiscoveryDojo.
In this interactive session you experience the power of structured conversations that engage stakeholders as product partners, explore product options, and hunt value. You learn essential skills through deliberate practice so you, your customers, and your team members can experience rich, efficient and powerful ways to build a shared understanding of product needs.
The session weaves quick teaching moments with coaching dojo circles. You practice with colleagues in each dojo – doing, facilitating, coaching, observing and providing feedback. We will ask for volunteers to serve as PO for their dojo circle. For an optimal learning experience, come prepared to share a real product need from your backlog. We will supply dojo circles with a case study, if needed.
You leave with helpful assets to immediately apply to your product work.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience the benefits of having conversations that holistically discover product requirements COLLABORATIVELY.
  • Learn to reveal business value in an engaging and fast way
  • Challenge how you view requirements, including user stories and MVPs
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

CEO/Founder, EBG Consulting
Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the convergence of agile + requirements + product management and a pioneer in the use of collaborative practices for product discovery. She offers techniques, tools, training, and leadership in how you can engage in ways that excite, invite, and produce valuable product outcomes and happy teams. | | Ellen is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and presenter. Her most recent book... Read More →
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Principle Consultant (and Indie-label Coach), Engage-Results.com
Steve Holyer is an experienced trainer, coach, facilitator and consultant helping organisations unleash value and produce results. He is also a frequent international speaker on Scrum and Agile software development. He serves as advocate and mentor for companies, leaders and change agents looking for a better way of working using Agile practices in a productive, fulfilling, and fun way. | | From international Swiss business to emerging... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Centennial 4

9:45am

Agile Transformation at Nickelodeon Digital (Teresa Hsu)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The Nickelodeon Digital team creates playful and surprising virtual experiences for kids everywhere they are. Our portfolio includes the Emmy Award-winning Nick App, the Nick Jr. App and its companion Apple Watch app, and the direct-to-consumer NOGGIN App across a diversity of platforms including iOS, Android, Web, Apple TV and Roku—with more in development. We began our Agile transformation in 2012 and along the way have faced device and platform proliferation, increased competition due to upheaval of traditional content distribution models, and growth in our agile operation.
In this Experience Report, we will cover our approach and lessons learned in the following areas:
• How we evolved team structure alongside product vision in a shifting business landscape – how did we originally set up our teams and why did we change? How are we addressing the increasing number of devices and platforms? What rituals have we added to address scale? What changes to our team structure do we anticipate in the foreseeable future?
• Integrating the creative process and fostering innovation – how do we create space for teams to innovate? Do we include ideation in our sprints? How do we infuse crazy fun into our process and our products?
• Our transition to a scaled agile model and what that means for Nickelodeon
• What support we needed from executive management and outside experts to make this transformation
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • • Several approaches to team structure, including pros and cons
  • • Structuring teams and product backlogs for creativity and innovation
  • • Example of a scaled approach, in a group creating consumer facing experiences for multiple platforms
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Teresa Hsu

Teresa Hsu

VP Portfolio Management, Viacom International and Nickelodeon Kids & Family, Viacom


Tuesday July 26, 2016 9:45am - 10:15am
Kennesaw

10:45am

Open Transformation (Todd Kromann, Mike Carey)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Pulling from 15 years of organizational change experience, I'll share how to change by remembering your core culture. You'll learn practical techniques on how to change by reminding people who they really are. Using lessons learned you'll learn what not to do. You'll learn how to use lean change management and open space agility to accelerate your change and ensure success. You'll learn how to everyone can be invited to change. No group needs to be forced to change. See how you can leverage multiple change techniques and get better results. Find out how to move leadership from commands to questions. Learn how you can ask "whose transformation is it?" and get the answer "My transformation.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • OpenSpace Agility is foundational. Don't tell people to go agile. Invite them to become better.
  • Help people remember who they are. The culture stated on the walls is good. The culture practiced isn't.
  • Find friends, lot's of friends. Find people who are open to improving. Invite them to help y'all change.
  • Get a sponsor, a very powerful sponsor. Don't have the sponsor do anything. Just get a sponsor.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mike Carey

Mike Carey

Sr. Tech Manager, Walmart Tech
Husband | Father | Technologist | Agile Coach and Enthusiast
avatar for Todd Kromann

Todd Kromann

Agile Coach, Walmart
Todd has nearly two decades of experience creating and deploying Agile methods for IBM, Accenture, Toyota, Honda, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, SaveMart, PG&E, ADP, Sony, SAIC, and Nationwide Insurance. He has a Masters in Software Engineering and Bachelors in Psychology. Todd also holds numerous certifications, including: PMP, ScrumMaster, Java Development, and RUP Implementation. In addition to Agile Coaching, Todd has served as a Project Manager... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
Kennesaw

10:45am

Introduction to Agile Collaboration and Teamwork (Nicole Belilos)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Self-organized, committed, collaborative, happy and hyper-performing.
That’s the description of the ideal Agile team. It sounds almost too good to be true. And indeed, many teams never reach that phase. So how is it possible?
Come to this session to learn what it takes to craft that collaborative Agile team. How to make the shift from individual contributors to jointly accountable team members. Learn about lift-offs, feedback loops, swarming and T-shaped people. Get insights in team locations, team space, culture and tools. Have a look at distributed teams. And experience different communication patterns and teambuilding activities.
After this introductory session, you will have basic understanding of the latest ideas and jargon on Agile collaboration and teamwork. And you will be well equipped to pick your next conference sessions to dive deeper into the subject.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will have basic understanding of the latest ideas and jargon on Agile collaboration and teamwork. And they will be well equipped to pick your next conference sessions to dive deeper into the subjects.


Speakers
avatar for Nicole Belilos

Nicole Belilos

Agile Coach | Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Xebia



Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover AB

10:45am

Distributed Agile: Evolution or Delusion? - Deuxième Partie (Mark Kilby)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
For years, we've heard "agile is for collocated teams. Don't do agile if you can't all be together. Without close daily interactions, agile cannot work.” Or, can it? With changes in technology and broader agile adoption, we are seeing organizations of dispersed teams where agile not only works, but thrives. But does it work the same way as when everyone is together? Can we truly be agile and be spread over time zones and locations?
Here are some of the challenges to explore: - What are the limitations and downsides of distributed Agile, and what tools and ways of working can address those? What are the advantages? How can we set things up to maximize the advantages and minimize the limitations?
  • Does a distributed agile approach encourage non-optimal structures...or can it help create new effective organizations ?
  • Are we asking professionals to adapt too quickly with new collaborative behaviors AND remote dynamics … or does learning the former overcome the latter?
  • How are cultural and language barriers impacted by both face-to-face work (e.g., offensive body language) or remote work (e.g., removing human touch). Or can one kind of work help avoid the challenges of the other?
  • Can working asynchronously and remote actually help some type of work and certain types of workers? Is this a new area for the introverts to thrive? What compromises are they not seeing, and what evolutions are we not seeing? Help us discover how distributed agile is an obstacle to overcome and a new way of working. Join us in this Audacious Salon.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers
avatar for Mark Kilby

Mark Kilby

Agile Coach, Sonatype
Since 1990, Mark Kilby has guided individuals, teams and organizations to develop unique software and system solutions for government, industry and academia. His roles have included software developer, technical lead, rocket scientist, principal investigator, technical architect, web development manager, methodologist, scrum master, product owner and agile coach (since 2003). His experience spans complete software development life cycles for a... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Spring

10:45am

Coaching Teams: Environment + People (Esther Derby)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
J. Richard Hackman spent his professional career researching teams and what makes the difference between teams that soar and those that flounder. After decades of research, he has some surprising insights into the sources of variation in team performance.
These sources of variation are probably not what you thought. The biggest source of variation is not coaching, nor the people on the team. It’s how the team is designed and how well the environment supports the team and teamwork. As a coach, your greatest leverage may not be interactions with individual team members (though that is very important). Your biggest impact on the team may come from assessing and adjusting the environment so the team has the support and conditions that enable great work.
In this session, we’ll explore how Hackman’s insights enable coaches to assess the team AND the environment, so they can take action to help the team soar.
Learning Outcomes:
  • *Understand the importance of the work environment in team success
  • *Ability to observe and apply a model based on Hackman's research
  • *One candidate action to take to improve the environment for teams
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Esther Derby

Esther Derby

Founder, esther derby associates, inc.
I’m an expert in organizational dynamics and a leading thinker in bringing agility to organizations, management, and teams. How your company’s values are reflected in your environment, your culture and organizational dynamics, directly determines the quality and level of your success. When your company environment, culture and organizational dynamics are positive, mutually receptive and reinforcing, your people and teams have the capacity to... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Centennial 4

10:45am

Help your organization outlearn the competition with Quantitative Improvement (Ashley Johnson, Arlo Belshee)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Which practice is this?
  • Periodically...
  • Hold a meeting…
  • Where people whine and moan…
  • Perhaps generate action items…
  • Then don’t do them.
In theory, retrospectives are the heart of agile methods, the reflect and adapt cycle that fuels continuous improvement. In practice, many leaders encounter passive resistance: the teams find them a painful waste of time. How can we get the real world benefit without the pain?
Patient, “It hurts when I do retrospectives. Retrospectives suck!”
Doctor, “Then stop doing that!”
Patient, “...OK, then what should I do instead?”
This session answers that question. Learn a simple system of practices that give retrospectives clear purpose and yield these additional benefits:
  • Rapidly align business and development on how much to invest in improvement.
  • Enable individuals to make local decisions that naturally implement the agreed investment.
  • Actually solve the problems you see.
  • Make improvement progress visible.
  • Get credit for solving those problems.
  • ...Without wasting time complaining in a meeting.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Easily make team improvement a first class deliverable, like product features.
  • Concretely visualize, track, budget, and prioritize improvement like product features.
  • Simplify and accelerate both learning experiments and habit changes.
  • Align interests of development, product, and management to invest in both product and productivity improvements continuously.
  • Provide management insight and data into which teams are improving and which need help.
  • Leave with a simple set of practices you can apply immediately with any team that struggles with retrospectives, or fails to repeatedly deliver improvements.


Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Sr. Program Mgr, Microsoft
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. | | More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant you will ever need to hire. After 6 months, you should be able to adapt your culture, practices, and company structures to meet novel challenges, each... Read More →
avatar for Ashley Johnson

Ashley Johnson

Senior Coach, Industrial Logic


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency VII

10:45am

A Path to High Performance: A Team Culture and Identity Building Game (Joshua Rowell, Arturo Robles Maloof)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Team culture defines a team: their identity, their behaviors, their effectiveness. High performing teams know how to work together, and either consciously or subconsciously understand their team culture. Identifying team behaviors and building team culture is something that gamers have done for 40+ years. Individuals work together as a team in table-top games in order to go on a journey. These teams are high performing. Not only do they have a shared vision and direction, but also understand how to leverage each other's skills.
In this session, Joshua and Arturo will utilize a framework from tabletop games that can help you build your team's world view. This world view weaves together skills, behaviors, and vision. Using this world view, we will foster a culture of collaboration by allowing the team to visualize their journey.
Allow a professional game master and a professional visual artist to help your teams paint a picture of openness and joy. Learn to utilize the frameworks that gamers use to have fun and be successful.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Drive effective teamwork by establishing a team's world view
  • Build solid teams by visualizing team identities and capitalizing on a holistic, balanced team vision
  • Setup teams for success by balancing skills and behaviors
  • Foster a culture of Agility based on teamwork and collaboration by shaping and influencing positive team chemistry
  • Use role playing to improve trust, honesty, respect, safety
  • Bring joy to teams
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Arturo Robles Maloof

Arturo Robles Maloof

Solutions Architect Executive Manager, Walmart de México y Centroamérica
Agile Evangelist, Photog and Geek that happens to work as an Executive Manager for Walmart on the Tech Division.
avatar for Joshua Rowell

Joshua Rowell

Agile Coach, Game Master, Walmart, Inc
With a love of games, I find constant joy in helping others work better together and fighting the dragons of the real world. This leads to removing waste, automating boring tasks, and uncovering complex problems that require creative teams to solve. It also means building great teams. Oh, and people also tell me I'm an Agile Coach.



Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover DE

10:45am

Dealing with Dysfunction – Using couples counselling patterns to manage conflict (Matthew Hodgson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Asimov's Laws of Robotics help man and machine get along. So, where are the laws that stop teams from hurting themselves either by action or inaction?
Come and learn about the Gottman Method – a psychological research-based approach to creating stronger relationships – and an example of its use with Asimov's Laws of Robotics to deal with agile team dysfunction, strengthen collaboration and help build happier teams. The presentation will help you:
  • Define trust and commitment – applying couples therapy to team and inter-team dynamics
  • Manage conflict over resolving conflict – understanding the critical differences in handling perpetual problems and solvable problems.
  • Create shared meaning – visions, narratives, myths, and metaphors about your relationship with team members.
  • Create emotional investment in the team – strengthening admiration, and expressing appreciation and respect for others.
  • Strengthen team relationship – building empathy by understanding others history, worries, stresses, joys, and hopes.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Applying the 3 Laws of Robotics Pattern at a Retrospective
  • The Gottman Method for managing healthy relationships applied to team dynamics
  • Understanding the psychological aspects that make happy team relationships
  • Identifying and quantifying stress and flooding and teaching your teams to do it themselves
  • Applying the Gottman patterns from relationships counselling to manage team dysfunction
  • How to recognise the physiological aspects of stress and interpersonal conflict
  • How to manage dysfunction versus resolving conflict


Speakers
avatar for Matthew Hodgson

Matthew Hodgson

Lead Partner for Enterprise Agile Transformation, Zen Ex Machina
Matthew has been using psychology to further ICT cultural change goals for 20 years. He is a contributing author to the books 'The Emergence of the Relationship Economy' and 'The Psychology of Aid' and continues to publish in international journals in the fields of psychology on the pragmatic aspects of learning, change, teamwork and motivation. | | As an agile coach, Matthew applies techniques from his background in psych and 20 years of... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover FG

10:45am

Career growth, recognition and continuous learning for software craftspeople (Steve Ropa)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Over the years, we've talked quite a bit about how to become a craftsman, exploring deeply how to progress from Apprentice to Master. What is often missing is any detail beyond the general thoughts that this is a Good Idea. Steve will share an approach, based on his experience of many years and many development organizations, to learning and career development for your team. This approach goes beyond the general ideas around Craftsmanship, but provides actual concrete areas of development. Unlike a formalized "skills checklist" we will apply a pattern language to help identify a continuum of growth for anyone's long term development.
We will discuss building understanding and building skills in the following areas:
Codecraft
Professional Skills
Process and Technical Ecosystems
Workflows
Tools
Learning Outcomes:
  • The primary learning outcome is a new "pattern language" to understand career and skill development for Craftsmen. Unlike a formalized "skills checklist" this is designed to help identify a continuum of growth for anyone's long term development.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steve Ropa

Steve Ropa

Agile Consultant, VersionOne
Steve has 26+ years of experience in software development and 16 years’ experience working with agile methods. Steve is passionate about bridging the gap between the business and technology and nurturing the change in the nature of development. He has currently been focusing many of his efforts around creating a culture of Craftsmanship in the entire development shop. As an Agile Coach, Steve has supported clients across multiple industry... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Baker

10:45am

When the Database Hits the Fan: Our Transformation into DevOps During Disaster Recovery (Mary Beth Snapp)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
What happens when everything that could go wrong, does? At The Ohio State University Libraries, one of our mission critical systems failed, and we couldn’t repair or restore the database. Historically, our Infrastructure and Development departments have had a collaborative relationship, leading us aspirationally to label our teams DevOps. However, it wasn’t until we found ourselves in a difficult disaster recovery situation that we transformed our culture from a transaction-oriented exchange of services to a true partnership. While we wouldn’t wish such a disaster on anyone, we invite you to learn from our hard-won success in this presentation. Your take-away will include a list of practical steps you, as an IT manager, can take to make sure your DevOps team is ready before disaster strikes.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn from the experiences of DevOps teams during disaster recovery situations
  • Identify your current approach to Development-Operations interactions—ranging from service exchange to true partnership
  • Take home a checklist of actions to reinforce and sustain DevOps in your own organization
Attachments:

Speakers
MB

Mary Beth Snapp

Head of Applications Development & Support, Ohio State University Libraries


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Piedmont

10:45am

With Sociocracy, Hierarchy Becomes Agile (Jutta Eckstein, John Buck)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Many agile teams suffer from the mismatch of agile and organizational leadership, with the latter being reflected by the organizational hierarchy. Based on self-organization and iterative processes, the agile teams run into trouble with the top-down steering of their environment. Consequently, agile proponents very often believe that a supportive agile organization should be structured without hierarchies, the so called “no managers” approach of “reinvented organizations.” Several companies in the agile field are experimenting with different organizational approaches that don’t use hierarchies. Yet, “no hierarchy” or “no managers” is not an option for many organizations.
In this session we suggest using sociocracy as a solution that leaves the hierarchies in place in an agile way - an option the organization is free to choose. Sociocracy shows how hierarchies can actually be agile and can strongly support (rather than opposing) agile philosophy. It enables managers to become agile leaders. As a participant you will learn how the principles of shared decision making and double-linking are key to enabling self-organization. These principles convert hierarchies from linear to circular so that they support an agile mindset.
Sociocracy is a way for groups and organizations to self-organize. Based on four principles (self-organizing teams, shared decision making based on consent, double-linking, and electing people by consent to functions and tasks), sociocracy provides a path for existing organizations to have empowerment and self-responsibility on all levels. Different than comparable methods, sociocracy allows companies to start where they are – with their existing organizational structures and the like. It seems to be a perfect fit for organizations that need to be truly agile (due to market pressure) beyond their IT departments and software teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand how the "sandwich position" of middle managers can be resolved.
  • Learn how scrum masters (and/or other team members) can be empowered for organizational agile adoption.
  • Experience a sociocratic election.
  • Understand experientially the sociocratic principles of shared decision making and double linking and how they can help you be an agile manager.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Buck

John Buck

Division Director, The Sociocracy Group
Coauthor: We the People: Consenting to a Deeper Democracy, a book about circular, healthy power. Let's talk about making your whole company Agile - not just the software/IT departments.
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She holds a M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, a Dipl.Eng. in Product-Engineering, and a B.A. in Education. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying Agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'Agile... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Fairlie

10:45am

The Business of Agile: Better, Faster, Cheaper (Ryan Ripley)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
During my last agile transformation a key stakeholder asked me, “Why are we doing this?” I talked about increasing quality, delivering software sooner, and fostering a more collaborative relationship with our business partners. After a few minutes, he raised his hand and stopped me.
“I get all that. BUT how is all of this agile stuff any better, faster, or cheaper than what we do today?”
Leaders must answer the “better, faster, cheaper” question if they want their agile transformation and projects to move forward.
To prepare leaders for this critical question, we explore how “better, faster, cheaper” translates to an agile organization, the metrics a leader can use to track progress towards “better, faster, and cheaper”, and how leaders can demonstrate the benefits gained from their agile activities.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the motivation behind asking for better, faster, and cheaper when justifying an agile transformation or project
  • How “better, faster, and cheaper” are achieved during an agile transformation or project
  • A useful method of presenting meaningful metrics to management and stakeholders that demonstrates the benefits gained during the agile transformation or project.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Ripley

Ryan Ripley

Ryan Ripley has worked on agile teams for the past 10 years in development, scrum master and management roles. He’s worked at various fortune 500 companies in the medical device, whole sale, and financial services industries. | | Ryan is great at taking tests and holds the PMI-ACP, PSM I, PSM II, PSE, PSPO I, PSD I, CSM and CSPO agile certifications. | | Ryan lives in Indiana with his wife Kristin and three children. He blogs at... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover C

10:45am

Lightning Talks - Process
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Lightning Talks features short high-impact presentations. Check out what's in this session:
  • Agile Approach to DevOps and Continuous Delivery - Anders Wallgren
  • The World's First Mob Design Session - David Grabel
  • Dejirafication - Alexey Krivitsky
  • LeanDxD: Where Lean Discovery meets Lean Delivery - Colleen Johnson
  • Using Visuals to Master the ART of SAFe/Release Planning - Marie Dingess
  • Nail It Before You Scale It! - Mark Noneman
  • Process telemetry ? visual, data-based feedback for teams - Bazil Arden
Learning Outcomes:
  • electricity


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Lenox

10:45am

Pin the Tail on the Metric (Steve Martin)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Metrics don’t have to be a necessary evil. If done right, metrics can help guide us to make better forward-looking decisions, as opposed to being used for simply managing or monitoring. They can help us identify trade-offs between options for what to do next versus be used as punitive, or worse, as managerial measures.
In this interactive session, we’ll take a different approach to metrics. I won’t be giving the top 10 list of field-tested metrics you should use. Instead, we’ll be workshopping through the critical thinking necessary for you to determine what is right for your organization and teams.
First, we’ll explore why you want to measure something in the first place, whether it’s for a team, a portfolio, or even an Agile transformation. We’ll next run through an exercise to help drive home concepts behind characteristics of “good” and “bad” metrics, so you can know what to look for. Lastly, we’ll pull together this information in an interactive Agile game called Pin the Tail on the Metric to help you guide your conversations back at your organizations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Understanding of the critical thinking needed behind choosing the right metrics at the right time for more effective and informative decision making
  • 2. Gain experience in identifying characteristics of good and bad metrics
  • 3. Learn how to run the “Pin the Tail on the Metric” exercise to help guide conversations about which metrics to use when and at what level at your organization
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steve Martin

Steve Martin

Sr Program Manager - Methodology & Governance, Pegasystems
With 20+ years’ experience, in Steve’s current role, he helps manage the Agile Methodology Approach for delivering Pegasystems engagements. Steve is a seasoned mentor and facilitator at all levels within companies, from executives to managers to delivery teams. He brings calmness and focus during turbulent transitions, partnering with organizations to reinvent their processes, approaches, and change their culture. Steve has a proven track... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency VI

10:45am

The State of NoEstimates (Woody Zuill)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
"The only sure thing about forecasts is that they are WRONG" - James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones. Estimates have been the bane of software development projects for decision makers, managers, and programmers alike for decades.
Managers/Customers want to know: When will it be done? How much will it cost? Programmers are told "We won't hold you to the estimate", and yet they often are. It's my contention that estimates are often not useful for this purpose, and even worse they misinform the decisions they are meant to support.
Do we really need estimates? Is simply "getting better" at estimates worthwhile? Can we live without them? Will things be better without them?
I don't have answers for you, but I've worked with "no estimates" for over 7 years and I'm still alive and doing well. I want to explore the idea of estimates, why they are pervasive in the programming world, how they might be harmful, and see if we can start a dialog about finding a better way to make decisions.
Learning Outcomes:
  • We'll explore and learn a few things about the nature of estimates, why we use them, how we use them, who benefits from them and how, and a few ideas about how we can start breaking the addiction to estimates.


Speakers
avatar for Woody Zuill

Woody Zuill

Application Development Manager, Hunter Industries
I've been a software developer for 30+ years, and I'm an Agile enthusiast. I work as an Agile Coach with the original "Mob Programming" team, and have been instrumental highlighting "No Estimates" concepts. | | I've enjoy sharing my Agile experiences, and learning new things. If you are ever in the San Diego area please stop by and "Mob" with us. | | I maintain and write for both the http://mobprogramming.org website, and my own blog at... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Centennial 1

10:45am

Incorporating security testing into an agile testing approach (Jeffery Payne)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
As more and more security-critical software applications are developed, tested, and delivered using agile, incorporating software security practices into an agile testing process becomes essential. This talk focuses on how to successfully incorporate security testing into all aspects of agile testing: development of security acceptance criteria & security stories, unit & component level security testing, security testing of user stories, and integration of security testing approaches into subsystem, integration, system, and regression testing activities. Practical lessons learned from integration security testing (both manual and automated approaches) into real-world agile projects will be discussed. Tools and automated techniques to support security testing within an agile environment are presented and demonstrated. Tips for getting started with security testing are discussed as well.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to get started integrating security into agile testing activities.
  • What some of the most important security testing activities are.
  • Where software developers and agile testers should focus their security testing efforts.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Payne

Jeff Payne

CEO/Founder, Coveros
Jeffery Payne has led Coveros since its inception in 2008. Under his guidance, the company has become a recognized market leader in secure agile software development. Mr. Payne is a popular keynote and featured speaker at technology conferences and has testified before Congress on technology issues such as intellectual property rights and cyber-terrorism. | | Prior to Coveros, he was co-founder, CEO, and Chairman of the Board of Cigital, where... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Courtland

10:45am

2020: The State of Agility (Jann Thomas)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Agile Software development practices are becoming the norm for software development. With wide scale adoption and customization what doe the future hold? Has being Agile become the check box that organizations now use in interviewing outsourced software work? What will the Agile of 2020 look like?
As we stand on the edge of the new decade 2020, a time of amazing opportunities, we need:
1) New Leadership
2) Organizations Designed for Success
3) Technical Excellence Defined
Presenting in this session will be Pat Reed, Susan Gibson, Ellen Grove and 1 other thought leader. This forum will allow these thought leaders will present their view on the next big thing in Agile even if that is leaving Agile behind and moving to a new paradigm. This moderated session will allow the participants to discuss trends in Agile, inside or outside of the business of software.
Expect provocative interaction on stage.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Roles of the Future
  • Next great frontier for Agile and Lean thinking
  • Disruptive Innovation
  • Culture of the future
  • Ensuring Technical excellence.


Speakers
JT

Jann Thomas

Enterprise Agile Coach, LeadingAgile
"Jann Thomas is a 20-year veteran of the software industry. She has worked as a developer, team lead and development manager leading teams to deliver great software. Jann has been practicing Agile development techniques since 1998 and implemented her first Agile Project in 2000. She has a Project Manager Professional certification from the Project Management Institute, with a master’s degree in Computer Science. | In 2010 Jann delivered a 14... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Learning Center

10:45am

Service Design in the Enterprise (Jabe Bloom, Will Evans)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Do you play a design, engineering, quality, or operations role in a large enterprise? Have you ever felt like it’s incredibly hard to deliver quality value to your customers or end-users? Maybe you work on a team that describes what they do as providing a “service”? Would you like to help your team collaboratively create a more holistic view of the systems they are working in so that you can apply some of the methods, mindsets, and processes from Agile, Lean, or Design Thinking? Come learn how!
PraxisFlow coaches have been using a combination of principles-based processes and methods including Service Blueprints and Wardley Maps to engage enterprise departments in Service Design and Design Thinking to create better flow. Our complexity-informed Service Design proposes that teams reimagine the systems they build and work within as complete sociotechnical systems. Systems that deliver value to users require the orchestrated interaction of humans and technology to deliver that value. Service Design equips designers and engineers with new tools, theory and praxis, to engage in productive discussions with operations (DesignOps anyone?) and management.
This session will focus on how to use a variety of tools including Service Blueprints and Wardley Maps together in order to view systems from a holistic sociotechnical service perspective. Our experience shows that the most effective teams have developed have a shared vocabulary and understanding of both the customer needs and the technical capabilities underpinning service delivery.
At PraxisFlow, we have learned by working with very large enterprises, that not all innovation efforts are worth the investments required as you scan across your portfolio. Exploring the intersection of these two maps, teams can determine the best parts of the value-chain to focus the appropriate design approaches (LeanUX FTW!). The result is innovation efforts that hit with the most impact.
This session is delivered as a fast-paced workshop. You’ll learn first with your hands and your friends, then we’ll briefly explore theory and leave you with plenty of pointers for further reading and research opportunities.
Learning Outcomes:
  • First we’ll explore how Service BluePrints can reveal the way user needs interact with the people and technologies in your organization. What does the customer need and see? What does the service organization do in response?
  • Next you’ll learn how Wardley Maps help capture value-chains that show the interrelationships between user needs, technology adoption and sociotechnical practices.


Speakers
avatar for Jabe Bloom

Jabe Bloom

Chief Flow Officer, praxisflow
Jabe Bloom has led teams and companies and developed software and products for almost 20 years. He has served as a Chief Architect, Principal Technical Director and Chief Technical Officer. In each of these roles his focus has been on connecting creative, ideation processes with software engineering and operational excellence.Jabes deep practical experience, constant experimentation, and extensive theoretical investigations and readings inform... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Dunwoody

10:45am

“Let’s Be Awesome”: Practices, Frameworks and Games to Improve Customer Collaboration (Jason Tice, Kevin Simpkins)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The agile manifesto challenges us to favor customer collaboration more than contract negotiation, but what does that really mean and how do you actually do that? In 2015, we decided to explore this statement and successfully launched an agile development program to build a real product seeking to make collaboration with the customer “fun”. We explored how to combine agile collaborative practices with risk, impediment, forecast and budgetary data to allow for the team and its customer to collectively make informed decisions. Join us at Agile2016 to hear real-life customer testimony of how we used familiar practices and available data to build an environment where the team and its customer maintained a positive relationship even when the project became challenging and overall had “fun” working together. To put ideas into practice, this workshop will allow you to get hands-on experience with a collaborative framework entitled “Let’s Be Awesome” that guides teams and their customers to decide on appropriate practices to build effective, “fun” and lasting relationships.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand which of the agile practices are most supportive of customer collaboration
  • Learn how to integrate data from agile development activities with collaborative agile practices to allow teams and their customers to make informed decisions together
  • Hear example success stories to provide insights and guidance on how to build strong customer relationships with an emphasis on “fun”
  • Guidance on how to use the “Let’s Be Awesome” collaboration framework to determine which practices are best suited for a team and its customer
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Simpkins

Kevin Simpkins

Department Manager, Enterprise Holdings, Inc.
JT

Jason Tice

Vice President of Business Innovation, World Wide Technology


Tuesday July 26, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency V

11:30am

Developers and Validators Working Remotely Together on a Single Kanban Board (Becky Berndt)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Before our development and validation teams started sharing a single Kanban board, communication was poor, trust was low, and our validation team was testing code changes that our development team made months, or even a year ago. This experience report presents the story of how a team working on manageability software for Intel’s recently announced 3D XPoint™ software stack learned to bring the validation side in synch with development.
We faced many challenges. We knew the best way to get everyone in synch was to get them all to work together as one team, increasing communication and transparency, something we were not able to do in the years before. I was able to convince powers to allow us to try something new, and then convince a new remote validation team that I had never met, to have faith and also try something new. I guided the team as they worked together to build confidence and comradery even though members were 8 hours apart.
Join me and learn how we were able to ramp up a new validation team quickly and shrink the time between feature creation and testing by having the transparency of the single Kanban board. Discover changes we are still making to get to our goal of having developers and validators working on the same work items at the same time to allow us to deliver a fully tested shippable product at the end of every sprint.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Positive practices for all team members when new members join an established team
  • Tactics for sharing codebases, knowledge, work items, and requirements changes while handling time zone differences
  • How you can change minds, given the chance, to take risks by instilling confidence
  • What it really takes to create a cohesive combined team
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Becky Berndt

Becky Berndt

Software Engineer, ScrumMaster, Intel Corporation


Tuesday July 26, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Kennesaw

1:30pm

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss? Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment. We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join!

Tuesday July 26, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Grand Hall Foyer

2:00pm

Facilitation #FTW! A surprising tool in an Agile transformation (Billie Schuttpelz)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
How is "facilitation" a surprising tool in an Agile transformation? Good facilitation wins the hearts and minds of the people. Without people, you have no transformation. If you want to create a "pull", rather than a "push", then grab onto facilitation as your entry point. Vastly different groups of people within this Fortune 100 Company, all had immediate boulders blocking their view to transformation. I decided to be a people's coach, rolling up my sleeves, working right there beside them, moving those immediate boulders. Once they could experience a different way of thinking through good facilitation, then they were more open to thinking differently about larger Agile transformation topics. Forget about processes and practices if their heads are full of other more immediate pain points. Help to push those boulders out of the way and you have cleared a path to Agile transformation. Give energy towards facilitating fast outcomes to current gaps, and you've built a bridge. Facilitation was a quick win and quick wins make stronger bridges.
In this experience report you will see behind the curtain as I share with you how customized facilitation opens doors within the organization to Agile mindset shifts that weren't being opened through our usual coaching approaches. You'll leave with my facilitation guides for reference and opportunities to talk to me more about how you could use facilitation as an Agile transformation tool.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • As a coach, active facilitation released the resistance of the boulders blocking transformation
  • As an Agile transformation agent, this challenged small paradigms that weren't as emotionally charged, in order to challenge larger paradigms in the future
  • As a coach, built trust by being in it with them, not above them talking theory
  • As a coach, these facilitated exercises opened up conversations that were not safe in normal settings, resulting in stronger high performing teams
  • Accelerate time to market. Let’s face it….meetings happen. Making them streamlined and value based using active facilitation brought the vision of Agile transformation closer.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Billie Schuttpelz

Billie Schuttpelz

Agile Coach, SolutionsIQ
Billie is a ‘force of nature’ breaking up the boulders blocking transformation; building bridges between technical people and business partners. She applies the perspective gained in a 20 year career including engagements in 5 countries to provide dynamic creativity and positive energy to everything she does. Billie knows that everyone matters, and impacting one person can have ripple effects throughout the entire organization, culture... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Kennesaw

2:00pm

Introduction to Agile Delivery (James Shore)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
What will happen when your team tries to deliver software with Agile? In this fun and interactive session, you'll play a game simulating the first two and a half years of a new Agile team. Every quarter, you'll decide where to devote your team's effort. Will you focus on develop features? Or put your effort into mastering Agile practices? Will you start with team-oriented practices like Retrospectives, or technical practices such as Test-Driven Development? Choose wisely, and don't get fired!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn the costs and benefits of a cross-section of Agile practices
  • Experience the trade-offs involved with developing features vs. mastering practices
  • Gain insights into the challenges and risks of learning various practices early vs. later


Speakers
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He led his first Agile team in 1999 and was an early adopter of Extreme Programming in 2000. Today, he focuses on helping people understand how all aspects of Agile, from technical, to business, to social, fit together to create successful software projects. | | James is an inaugural recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover AB

2:00pm

Unlocking Innovation in Product Discovery - Première Partie (Dion Stewart)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
If the first decade of agile development was about building products the right way, it might be said the last five years have been focused on building the right product. Creating innovative products is still a challenging and elusive pursuit. We have years of experience helping teams adopt design and discovery practices like prototypes, user interviews, personas, story mapping, sketching, user journeys, and release slicing. Still, there are untapped approaches for unlocking innovation in product discovery.
We've found value building personas using persona characteristics rather than stereotypical or archetypal users. Personas can be created starting with well known celebrities or character types, which could lead to new ideas and perspectives for innovation.
We've also explored writing stories based on a model for storytelling taught by Robert McKee (mckeestory.com), a well-known screenwriting teacher to help teams move beyond simple narrative structures to come up with better product ideas.
Bring your own ideas for additional ways of approaching product discovery. They can be experimental, partially-formed, and theoretical. We’ll experiment with these alternative approaches to product discovery. We'll form questions for exploration, even continuing to explore these new ideas in small groups well beyond the end of the conference.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Spring

2:00pm

The Secrets of Facilitating Retrospectives and other Meetings (Jutta Eckstein)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Retrospectives and other meetings are typically the events where information is shared and decisions are made. This means, that a lot of work is done or at least guided by such meetings. Moreover as a coach, most often you are leveraging retrospectives and other meetings in order to introduce change or to deal with challenges during change. Luckily, meanwhile there are a lot of books available focusing on techniques, activities, games, and the structure of retrospectives. These books and the respective courses provide a good foundation for leading a retrospective. Yet, these are tools only. Because, although we often have a great toolbox of facilitation techniques handy, the retrospectives we're facilitating aren't always successful. The reason is that we're putting too much emphasis on games, activities, and formats and too less on the craft of facilitation. In this session you will learn what to focus on when preparing a retrospective (or a similar facilitated event), how to ensure that as a facilitator you will have the "right" attitude, and how to ensure smooth group decisions. By understanding the role of the facilitator you will learn for example, how to keep all participants engaged (even the quiet ones and without having the talkatives using up the whole time), or how to deal with issues that are not solvable by the team.
In this session I want to share my experiences based not only on having facilitated many retrospectives, yet also on having completed both a course of teacher training and of professional facilitation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the importance of the preparation (methodical, physical, personal, organizational)
  • Learn to deal with timeboxes: when do they help, when do they disturb
  • Learn how to ensure a group decision with the buy-in from everyone
  • Increase your awareness of group dynamics
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She holds a M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, a Dipl.Eng. in Product-Engineering, and a B.A. in Education. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition. She has a unique experience in applying Agile processes within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'Agile... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency VII

2:00pm

Battling Scrum fatigue (Gavin Coughlan)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Scrum can be incredibly motivating and produce great results, an exciting environment, and help people thrive whilst maintaining a good work/life balance. But what happens when a Scrum project continues for a long duration? How do you stop burnout or fatigue from setting in?
The Scrum framework allows for a lot of flexibility, but the repeated cadence and ceremonies can become monotonous over time and occasionally seem relentless. I have been working with a Scrum team that has been in place for 7 years (possibly New Zealand’s longest running Scrum team) and in that time I have seen all the ups and downs of long-term Scrum project.
As a result, we have seen what works and what doesn’t work in terms of keeping a team engaged over a long period of time. We have focussed our efforts on three factors that are most important to a team, and have seen great results. This allowed is to minimize our efforts in the areas that had no real impact on the team’s motivation, freeing up time for the good stuff!
During my talk we you will learn:
  • The three factors the team considered the most motivating, and what you can do to help these thrive
  • The three factors the team considered the least motivating, and what can be done to make sure these are in place with minimal effort
  • how to measure a team's engagement level
  • The hygiene factors (stuff the team didn’t care about unless they were suddenly absent) that need to be maintained
Learning Outcomes:
  • Discover techniques to measure what motivates a team
  • Learn how to help a team stay engaged over a long period of time
  • Determine what hygiene factors should be in place
  • Understand the most valuable things a Scrum Master can do for the team
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gavin Coughlan

Gavin Coughlan

Agile Coach and trainer, Boost
As an Agile Coach, my aim is to help teams set themselves up to build useful things that change people's lives, and have fun doing it. | | I have worked in the web industry for over 17 years as a Front-end Developer, Project Manager and, since 2011, Agile Coach and Trainer. | | You can talk to me about how to motivate teams and swap ideas around what has worked and what hasn't.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Dunwoody

2:00pm

The Five Dysfunctions of an Improvised Comedy Group (Paul Hammond, Daniel Attfield)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
"Here's a good one - what do software teams and improv comedy groups have in common?"
If you want to know the punchline, you'll have to come to our lively and fun workshop ...
The core principles of Improvisation, when followed, create magic on stage. The funniest improv teams consist of individuals that support unconditionally, listen actively, accept and build on each others' ideas, and make each other look good. They produce amazing results.
This is also true for software teams.
In Patrick Lencioni's book "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team", he underscores the importance of trust, constructive conflict, commitment, and accountability, as a team works towards producing outstanding results.
Join us for a fun-filled, highly active workshop in which we use Improv Comedy exercises to draw clear parallels between the Improv Principles and the Five Dysfunctions model.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Practical techniques and exercises to build trust and unconditional support among team members, promote active listening and acceptance, and encourage a "team-first" ethos.
  • An understanding of the core principles of theatrical and comedy improvisation, and their parallels with The Five Dysfunctions of a Team.
  • Resources to take this further, and implement these and other exercises within their teams.


Speakers
avatar for Dan Attfield

Dan Attfield

Dan is a professional comedian, musician, and improviser. He tours internationally with comedy hip hop improvisers Abandoman, and YouTube sketch team The RH Experience. When not on stage, he provides business and technical consultancy services, using his performance skills combined with those honed working as a software engineer at Microsoft.
avatar for Paul Hammond

Paul Hammond

Director of Development, eBay


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Centennial 1

2:00pm

Advice Process for Effective Organizational Decision-Making (Michael Sahota)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
The goal of Enterprise Agility is to have a nimble, flexible organization. To reach this end we need to have a clear decision-making process that supports autonomy and learning while achieving effective outcomes.
The Advice Process is easy to understand. Anyone in the organization can make a decision provided they get advice from everyone who will be meaningfully affected and people with expertise in the matter. The Advice Process helps organizations develop trust, ownership and learning to create a nimble organization. The Advice Process originates from corporate innovation as documented in “Joy at Work” and “Reinventing Organizations”
In this hands-on session you will learn how to use “Advice Poker” cards as a sense-making and education tool to explore how decisions are made and can be made. The Advice Process will be contrasted with other approaches such as consensus and traditional hierarchical decision-making. You will walk away with a powerful tool to invite greater levels of trust and ownership to allow Agile to scale.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Able to use advice process in daily interactions with others
  • Explain key benefits and challenges of different decision-making processes
  • See relationship between decision-making process and trust, ownership and learning
  • Use Advice Poker to create agreements about ownership of decisions
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency V

2:00pm

Stop Using Agile with Waterfall Goals: Goal Agility with OKR (Objectives and Key Results) (Felipe Castro)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Although we have been using Agile mindset and processes tactically, when it comes to strategy and goal setting the waterfall command&control mindset is still the norm.
Most organizations are still using an annual, waterfall, top-down process to create a static set of goals that conflicts directly with Agile.
This talk will show how to define agile goals using OKR (Objectives and Key Results), the goal setting framework adopted by Google, Twitter, LinkedIn and Dropbox.
Attendees will learn how OKR can complement Agile and Lean by:
1) Creating a results-focused culture.
Agile was created as an alternative for managing software development projects. As such, it is focused on managing deliverables (user stories) instead of business results. OKR can help change this mindset from output to outcomes.
2) Enabling autonomous, self-organizing teams
OKRs enables team autonomy by changing the role of the team from “delivering the features the stakeholders wants” to “achieving the OKRs agreed with the stakeholders”.
3) Adopting value-based ceremonies
There is not a single ceremony in Agile for tracking results. By adopting OKR, Agile teams can change this scenario and start to regularly check progress.
OKR also helps prioritize the backlog. If a feature does not help achieving the OKRs, it is not a priority.
4) Enabling Agile Transformation by replacing predictability with results
One of the main barriers to Agile is the loss of perceived predictability. OKR helps overcome that by replacing the Gantt chart with a commitment to deliver pre-defined business results. Instead of committing to deliver X by Y date, the team commits to iterate towards the agreed OKRs.
5) Incentivizing leaner approaches and smaller batches
By adopting a value-based timebox, teams commit to to deliver value (improve the OKRs) until the end of the OKR iteration. This makes them adopt leaner approaches in order to measure it’s impact on the OKRs and adjust accordingly.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding that although we have been using Agile for execution, strategy is still mostly a waterfall process.
  • Understanding the need for an Agile framework for goal setting and strategy execution.
  • How to create OKRs.
  • Using OKRs to create alignment between teams and the stakeholders.
  • How to use OKR to complement Agile and Lean.
  • Setting goals based on value (Outcomes) instead of tasks or features (Output).
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Felipe Castro

Felipe Castro

Partner, OKR Coach, Lean Performance
Felipe founded Lean Performance in 2014 to help companies transform how they set goals by abandoning the waterfall, command&control mindset and embracing an agile approach for goal setting. He's a global thought leader in Goal Agility, the intersection between Agile and OKR. | | Felipe believes that Agile is on the eve of a new wave that will reshape organizations and empower teams to do work that is more engaging and valuable... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Lenox

2:00pm

WIP: The tragedy continues (Eric Willeke)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The nature of the modern world pushes to us to do more, faster. This unrelenting pressure puts the people and teams that DO the work in a wonderful situation where they can indeed make everybody happy... if only they could do one. more. thing. Two clear choices emerge: start everything, or finish something.
This talk reintroduces three concepts critical to anybody who performs work:
  • an understanding of flow and process efficiency,
  • recognition of the tragedy of WIP, and
  • insight to the cost of commitment.
We will then extend these core concepts, exploring:
  • the impact of WIP in multi-tiered portfolio systems and
  • strategy deployment at enterprise scale.
Each topic includes specific, immediately applicable advice on how to improve your throughput and reduce the stress associated with doing your work. Anybody who works with or leads multiple teams will benefit from the simple guidance. You can quickly apply and use several simple exercises that show the impact of WIP and over-commitment.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Apply correct lean terminology when discussing the state of work
  • Distinguish between active, queue, and idle times
  • Anticipate the impact of committing to additional work using Little's law
  • Appreciate the degree of impact of overloading a system
  • Recognize how excessive commitment can push a team over the cliff
  • Connect visual, emotional, textbook, and kinesthetic understandings of Little's Law
  • Recognize that WIP discussions are strongly supported by evidence, not opinion
  • Apply the underlying mechanics of WIP limits to achieve improvement
  • Extend basic WIP concepts to portfolio management and strategy flow
  • Recognize the impact WIP has in impeding innovation
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Eric Willeke

Eric Willeke

Advisor: Enterprise Agility, CA Technologies
Eric Willeke is an experienced transformation consultant with deep Agile expertise and an extensive history of working with enterprise customers. Eric guides CA|Rally’s largest customers through their complex Agile adoption and transformation efforts, helping them build capability to sustainably and successfully deliver on the needs of their business. For more than a decade, his personal vision statement, “Helping everybody on a project sleep... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Courtland

2:00pm

Can a simple room cause leadership tranformation? (Ruben Jannink, Peter Noordzij)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Why and when does a (senior) leadership team truly become a team? How can leaders collaborate and experience the great feeling of having an engaging purpose together? In other words, how can senior leadership both be and work Agile themselves? We think that this transformation of leadership is essential for an enterprise to be Agile.
For the past five years ING leadership has been transforming to Agile practicing it every day. And a room is playing a crucial role in this...
We will transform our conference room into a real life example and show you, hands-on, how we use it and how you can too. We will share our principles which are rooted in deep beliefs about Agile Leadership. Also our Leadership Way of Working and the techniques used daily.
The principles, way of working and techniques are all still evolving today. So we will also share our story of the transformation of the entire ING Wholesale Banking Services organization. This is an organization with more than 130 DevOps and Leadership teams around the globe. We will share with you our struggles, learnings and successes.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Knowing and understanding our Agile Leadership principles
  • Understanding the concept of our Agile Leadership Obeya, Explorer Maps and it’s use
  • Understanding our Leadership Way of Working and the techniques we use
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Ruben Jannink

Ruben Jannink

Lean Agile Manager, ING
Ruben is Lean Agile Manager for ING Wholesale Banking Services. He helps people in the organization to collaborate and align with more than 160 DevOps teams and many partners. He coaches management, stakeholders and teams and offers Agile coaches a home in the organization.
avatar for Peter Noordzij

Peter Noordzij

Manager IT Payments, ING
Background in IT and experience with various teams and programs in Wholesale Banking IT. Currently responsible for 40+ devops teams in the area of payment and order management. The organisation is currently progressing with its transition to Agile. | Interest include: how to create (senior) Agile leadership teams that foster collaboration and an engaging purpose together. Best practices in cross functional and international change... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover FG

2:00pm

Growing Your Servant Leadership (Johanna Rothman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Your management wants your team to commit to dates or deliverables. Your team wants adaptability so they can provide the best product at all times. You feel torn between your management and your team, stuck in the middle. You can manage your situation by growing your adaptability and servant leadership.
This is a common problem when organizations transition to agile. The managers still want the assurances that the plan-driven approaches appeared to provide them. How can they depend on the team to deliver value if they don’t know when the team will release the product?
The teams want the freedom to work with the product owner and deliver a great product. How can they create a great product if they have to spend all their time estimating the entire product backlog, or appeasing management with surrogate measures?
Both the managers and teams are correct. Managers need to know what to expect when. Teams need the flexibility of reacting to product owner feedback. Does that mean you need to create Gantt charts or ask people to commit to specific stories?
No. When you change what you measure and report, you can change the conversation and actions. You have alternatives: Helping the team measure what direct measurements instead of surrogates; helping the product owner create deliverable-based roadmaps and small stories, helping the managers differentiate between projects and programs, and see progress in agile ways.
In this session, we will problem-solve in small groups. You will have an opportunity to describe your specific problems and help each other develop potential solutions.
We’ll explore what servant leadership means and how you can grow your servant leadership, practicing in an iterative and incremental way.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the seven traits of servant leaders and how that applies to management
  • The difference between empirical data and surrogate data
  • Understanding needs of both management and your team
  • Ways to discuss what agile means and agile deliverables with management
  • Measurements that make sense to both the team and managers
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Johanna Rothman

Johanna Rothman

President, Rothman Consulting
Johanna Rothman, known as the "Pragmatic Manager," provides frank advice for your tough problems. She helps leaders and teams see problems and resolve risks and manage their product development. | | Johanna was the Agile 2009 conference chair. She is the current agileconnection.com technical editor. Johanna is the author of several books including: Agile and Lean Program Management: Scaling Collaboration Across the Organization... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Centennial 4

2:00pm

Agile is fun, your training should be too! (J.P. Beaudry, Sean Barrett)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Education is a key component of any successful Agile transformation. Yet, commonly used training materials and delivery are built around the traditional single-presenter format which research has proven to be one of the least effective methods to influence beliefs and behaviors. In this workshop you will discover how straightforward it can be to create high impact, deeply engaging education experiences for your audiences.
We will introduce interactive training techniques that are both hands-on and fun. Participants will explore different content delivery styles, and learn why they work so well. Join us to find out how we put the techniques presented in Sharon Bowman's "Training From The Back Of The Room" into action to help our company discover Lean and Agile principles in a way that repeatedly creates more demand for continuing education and expanded coaching opportunities.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Experience the 4Cs in action
  • Experience multiple options to greatly increase engagement
  • How to reduce education time while increasing impact
  • Recognize signals of engagement
  • Basic overview of the 4Cs


Speakers
avatar for Sean Barrett

Sean Barrett

Agile Coach, Vistaprint
Talk to me about: Agile transformation for organizations and "Training from the Back of the Room"
avatar for JP Beaudry

JP Beaudry

Head of Lean/Agile, Vistaprint
I'm interested in producing more customer value, achieving better financial outcomes for organizations, and doing so in a manner that creates a better work environment for the people.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Piedmont

2:00pm

Growth Mindset -> Learning Organisation -> Agility (Marian Willeke)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Learning is the primary constraint for achieving agility. This workshop provides a path to achieving a growth mindset as an enabler to becoming the learning organisation necessary for maximising agility. If you want the learning, collaboration, and positive behaviour so essential in Agile practice within your team, you absolutely must take responsibility for being a catalyst.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Correlate agility with a learning organisation.
  • Connect how growth mindset perpetuates learning.
  • Identify learning frameworks that enhance growth mindset.
  • Determine how we can influence a growth mindset.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marian Willeke

Marian Willeke

Director, Adaptive Learning
My passion is centered around ensuring effective learning experiences that improve people's lives. Developing a learning mindset is my ultimate goal whether working with academic programs or corporate training; formal or informal learning practices. It is my belief that our potential for agility is limited only by our capacity for learning.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency VI

2:00pm

Your User Stories Are Too Big! (Chris Sims)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Product owners often struggle to translate their big ideas into small user stories that the team can deliver in a short period of time. When a user story is too big, it is harder to understand, estimate, and implement successfully. This experiential session will give you hands-on experience with 4 simple techniques to split the large stories in your backlog into smaller stories. While there are many additional techniques, this set of four has proven itself sufficient to split virtually any big story into smaller stories. You will work in small teams, applying each of the techniques to break some big user stories into smaller user stories.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will be able to use four specific techniques to split large user stories into smaller, more specific stories.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Sims

Chris Sims

Agile Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile Learning Labs
Chris Sims is a Certified Scrum Trainer, agile coach, and recovering C++ developer who helps software development teams improve their productivity and happiness. Chris is the founder of Agile Learning Labs and co-author of two best-selling scrum books: The Elements of Scrum and Scrum: a Breathtakingly Brief and Agile Introduction.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover DE

2:00pm

Stephen Denning's Stalwarts Session (Stephen Denning)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
**The Role of Agile and Scrum In Today’s Organization
Session description:
Steve Denning will discuss the global trend in which the management and leadership approaches broadly known as Agile—including its most important exemplar, Scrum—have been spreading from individual teams, to multiple teams, to whole departments and divisions, and ultimately to the whole organization. He will review the reasons for, and the prospects of, “the Agile Organization” and the role of Scrum within it. He will discuss the business reasons why these changes have been occurring and how organizations of different sizes and in different sectors are coping with the challenges. He will review the challenges that lie ahead, including factors that are enabling success and common pitfalls that organizations are encountering. He will draw on the findings of the Learning Consortium for the Creative Economy, organized by Scrum Alliance, in which major organizations around the world shared their experiences with Agile and Scrum.
Learning Outcomes:
  • A deeper understanding of the role of Agile as a fundamental transformation of leadership and management in the 21st Century.
  • A recognition of Agile as a Copernican revolution in management.
  • Insight into what is involved in making the whole organization Agile.


Speakers

Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Inman

2:00pm

Does Agile still need testers? (John Stevenson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
There has been a great deal of talk about the role of testers especially in agile teams. With many people questioning whether there really is a need for professional/dedicated testers in agile. Large amounts of effort and discussions have taken place regarding the use of 'automation' to replace manual testing and how testers can be replaced by this in agile teams.
During this session we will discuss some of these, and other, common misconceptions of testing and testers by means of audience participation to see how many of these misconceptions/myths are prevalent in the software testing industry.
Some examples of this include:
Testing is a bottle neck
Testing happens at the end of the sprint.
We do not need to test we can get our users to test it.
We then look at what happens during a typical software development iteration, with a focus on the software testing activities. We will discuss the problems with automation and why it may not be the 'golden goose' that is typically promoted as being able to replace testing. The discussion will introduce the test execution model and show what can and cannot be automated. The test execution model will introduce the concepts of tacit and explicit knowledge and looks at what we learn from philosophy. As part of this discussion/debate we will look at what is it that makes us unique as human rather than as automatons.
Following this we will focus on what the future holds for testers and that path they can follow. We will look at different roles that a tester can take responsibility for in agile teams, roles that utilize the unique skills of testers. During the talk John will introduce roles such as quality advocate and testing coach and draw from his own personal experience how these roles can be incorporated into agile teams. At the end of the talk as a group we will create an action plan of ideas we want to take away and trial within our own agile teams to show that testing is far more than ticking boxes.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The future role of testers will become more flexible and adaptive
  • Not everything can be automated nor should we automated everything we can.
  • There will be less hands on testing and more supporting/consulting.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for John Stevenson

John Stevenson

Technical Leader (Test), Cisco
Having been involved in testing for over 20 years and within the IT industry for more than 24 years I am still surprised with how exciting I find it and how much I continue to learn about things that are new. I have a passion for learning and love to learn about new things. I have an interest in many things such as social science, psychology, photography and gardening. I keep involved within the testing community and write a testing blog... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Learning Center

2:00pm

Test Your Own Stuff! Dealing with Dependencies Between (and on) Agile Teams (Alex Kell)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Dependencies are present in every project; some code over here needs code over there, and we can't be sure the code over here works until the code over there is done! Well, sure, that makes a kind of sense. But often teams take this to an extreme; they allow themselves to become blocked, or even worse, hinder other teams from making progress due to their demands. We'll learn how the types of dependencies (defined here as Blockers, Yaks, and Mirrors) can be recognized, and overcome and especially how true blockers can be avoided with good understanding of the system architecture and a grasp of test automation techniques.
If you're a tester or programmer:
  • You'll learn how to recognize and diagnose the types of dependencies you'll face.
  • You'll be (re)introduced to Agile Testing models and automated checking techniques (with a twist!) that will help you overcome these dependencies.
  • You'll be confident that you can test your software without having to ALSO test the software that you depend on.
  • You'll (maybe) be able to convince the people who run the software that depends on YOUR software that they don't need to test YOUR software.
If you're a manager or architect:
  • You'll learn about the dependency traps you're setting by how you decide on and set up processes and tooling.
  • You'll be better equipped to recognize the dependencies you're creating between teams and organizations that create the components that make up your solutions.
If you're anybody involved with software development:
  • You'll approach common software dependencies that you've always assumed to be insurmountable in a new way.
You'll learn how to Test Your Own Stuff!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn why and how dependencies are the biggest obstacle to Agile success.
  • Learn ways to mitigate traditional testing bottlenecks between teams (whether Agile or not).
  • Learn (or re-learn) Agile testing models and key automation techniques to specifically combat dependency traps.
  • Learn from specific examples of dependencies being overcome in real-world software solutions used by millions.
  • You'll be confident that you can test your software without having to ALSO test the software that you depend on.
  • You'll (maybe) be able to convince the people who run the software that depends on YOUR software that they don't need to test YOUR software.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Alex Kell

Alex Kell

Quality Architect, Fiserv, Inc.
Alex Kell has worked in the Software Industry for more than 20 years holding associate and management positions in Support, Development, Sales, Product Management and Testing. He has been involved in the Atlanta Agile community for the past 10 years and has helped lead Agile transformations at two Fortune 500 Enterprise-level companies. | | Currently Alex holds the role of Principal Quality Architect where he helps teams create... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Baker

2:00pm

UX and A3 Thinking: User First Problem Exploration (Catherine Swetel, Michael Caponero)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Has your team or organization ever delivered a fun, shiny solution, only to realize later it was a solution to a problem that doesn't exist? Has your team ever felt the features you developed were treating symptoms without ever really identifying users' underlying problem?
A3 Thinking (pioneered by Toyota) is a method for problem exploration and validation. It can mitigate the risk of delivering unneeded products and features by helping to identify, explore, and validate problems and solutions in a disciplined manner. During this workshop, attendees will learn how to use an empathy map, a common UX tool, to inform the A3 process, write great hypotheses, and design effective experiments. This workshop is ideal for those in a UX role or anyone working on an Agile team currently using personas or empathy maps.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Create an empathy map
  • Use the empathy map to add constraints to the A3 and experimentation processes
  • Generate an A3
  • Use A3 Thinking to validate problems and solutions
  • Use A3 Thinking to remove subjectivity from the problem identification and exploration process
  • Understand how to use an empathy map or persona to introduce your team to A3 Thinking
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Michael Caponero

Michael Caponero

Visiting Scientist, PraxisFlow
Mike is a “visiting scientist” at PraxisFlow, where he uses his instructional design skills to continuously improve and adapt trainings to effectively meet current clients’ needs and contexts by engaging participants in the active construction of knowledge of lean/agile/strategy deployment/etc in socially interactive and cooperative settings. He is a former science teacher and current college debt slave, holding a BS in Environmental and... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Swetel

Catherine Swetel

Cat has experience applying lean principles in a variety of settings: from startups to large enterprises, warehouses to web, etc. She is passionate about increasing diversity in tech. In her leisure time, Cat enjoys making jokes about Bitcoin, drinking beer, and reading feminist literature.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover C

2:00pm

Impact Mapping at the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant without mistakes, Doh! (Justin Kotze)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Impact Mapping helps us establish what really needs to be done in order to make our business goals a success. It produces a roadmap that teams can work from. It even promotes experimenting, testing assumptions and helps avoid "pet features". The goal is not always to write more software. Impact Mapping addresses this, even in chaotic environments like the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant.
Justin comes from Clickatell.com where he has facilitated several Impact Mapping workshops all across the organisation. Today he find himself as the new Agile Coach at Springfield Nuclear Power Plant. He is tasked to help Mr Burns, Smithers, Homer and many more Springfield citizens create an Impact Map to drive the new requirements. Even Homer will be unlikely to fail after this. He shares what it is and how to facilitate a impact mapping workshop, pitfalls to look out for and how to use shuttle diplomacy in your favor while drawing parallels to the Simpsons universe.
Learn why it's a bad idea to just start an Impact Mapping session without understanding the people involved.
Learn about what to do when some of your of stakeholders and customers get so upset, they turn into Sideshow Bob and leave the session.
Learn about when it is safe to experiment with it and what to do when you realize that it's not working for you.
A must for Product Owners, Business Analysts, ScrumMasters, Agile Coaches and anyone who often find themselves in a Springfield Nuclear Power Plant environment and want to facilitate a session like this.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What is impact mapping
  • When to run an impact mapping session
  • How to facilitate it
  • What is shuttle diplomacy
  • Traps to look out for while facilitating impact mapping
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Justin Kotze

Justin Kotze

Agile Coach, Clickatell
I want to live in a world filled with innovative businesses, happy teams and a dancing squirrel. I am an Agile Coach at Clickatell where I tries to create the environment for this daily. As a Agile guy I often inspect & adapts, and recite the Agile Manifesto in the shower. Ask me about coaching circles and agile tourism when you see me.


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Fairlie

2:45pm

Things Are Broken: A Case Study In Moving Tooooooooooo Fast (Chris Murman)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
"Move fast and break things." -- Mark Zuckerberg
He made that quote famous years ago, and it lit a fire under many in the sect of software I work in. Mobile development is no longer a hobby for companies today, and in that world speed is the key. If you can't innovate and change fast enough, you'll get left in the dust. Which is why we embrace the principle of "welcoming changing requirements, even late in development." You could say we have laid out the welcome mat and left the door unlocked for that one. It's allowed the company to grow immensely, and partnered with our parent company Ogilvy we have accomplished some amazing things.
It's also caused some challenges for our teams internally, and forced us to ask some tough questions. Teams felt the whiplash of this pace, and our clients started finding the loose nature they signed up for to be a bit of a burden. Change has a cost, and we weren't taking the time to understand it before the bill came due.
I would like to take everyone through some of my learnings as the agile coach at Bottle Rocket over the last 3 years. Regardless of the kind of change our companies need -- whether they be on individual teams or organizationally -- there are ways we can welcome change in a better way. Some of the topics I'll cover are:
• Measuring change: How value-stream mapping gave us the right kind of information to improve how we work.
• Embracing simplicity: How we embraced the right kind of lean principles as a result.
• Understanding swarming better: You can't simply throw people at the problem.
• Knowing what to do with the word "scope": Expectations are everything with requirements and time tables.
• Working hand-in-hand with business: Don't assume outside stakeholders understand what you are doing.
• Seeing dependencies better: Do you really know what it takes to begin your next feature?
By no means are we a finished product, but I hope you'll join me in seeing how we are starting to work smarter instead of harder.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • • I learned that you can, indeed, move too fast as a team.
  • • I learned the many ways it can impact the quality of work.
  • • I learned that team happiness may not necessarily be the best indicator of work product quality.
  • • I learned that speeding up actually slows down communication.
  • • Finally, I learned that the best way to communicate this to key stakeholders is with measurable data.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Chris Murman

Chris Murman

Change Agent, ThoughtWorks
Chris' first job out out of college was the weekend sports anchor at an NBC affiliate. If he had only known what was in store for his career! Interestingly enough, he still loves telling the stories of others around him every day. Each interaction is an opportunity to learn what made you unique, and understand where you came from. Chris thinks if you got to know each other more on a personal level, it would make the tough conversations easier to... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Kennesaw

3:45pm

Mob Programming for the Introverted - Curated XR Program (Aaron Griffith)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Mob Programming is a software development approach where the whole team works on the same thing, at the same time, in the same space, and at the same computer. At first glance, this would appear to be a very daunting activity for an introvert. As an introvert and Mob Programmer myself, I have discovered that it is a very enjoyable and rewarding exercise, with a few challenges that were easy to overcome.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • **
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Kennesaw

3:45pm

Introduction to Agile Leadership: Recognizing and Removing Impediments (Thomas Perry)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
When not uncovered and resolved, impediments can do harm to an otherwise well run project in ways that are often subtle and easy to miss. If impediments undermine the success of our teams, then we as project managers, leaders, and stakeholders should all be very passionate about removing impediments. In order to accomplish this we need to do three things: we need to give impediments the proper attention, we need to become experts at uncovering them, and we need to integrate them into the process of continuous improvement within the team.
In this session Tom makes a passionate appeal for the importance of the lowly impediment - often ignored, but never missed.
Learning Outcomes:
  • This session will give you hands on experience with impediment busting tools you can apply with your own team.
  • An understanding of the fundamentals of impediment tracking, management, and removal that you can apply to any project.
  • If you are already managing impediments for your team, then this session will give you a few new creative ideas that you can try out as well.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Sr. Principal Transformation Coach, CA
Tom has been working in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management, agile coaching/mentoring and training. As part of his involvement in the greater agile community, he led the Seattle eastside chapter of the APLN. Tom speaks at a wide variety of software... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover AB

3:45pm

Unlocking Innovation in Product Discovery - Deuxième Partie (Dion Stewart)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
If the first decade of agile development was about building products the right way, it might be said the last five years have been focused on building the right product. Creating innovative products is still a challenging and elusive pursuit. We have years of experience helping teams adopt design and discovery practices like prototypes, user interviews, personas, story mapping, sketching, user journeys, and release slicing. Still, there are untapped approaches for unlocking innovation in product discovery.
We've found value building personas using persona characteristics rather than stereotypical or archetypal users. Personas can be created starting with well known celebrities or character types, which could lead to new ideas and perspectives for innovation.
We've also explored writing stories based on a model for storytelling taught by Robert McKee (mckeestory.com), a well-known screenwriting teacher to help teams move beyond simple narrative structures to come up with better product ideas.
Bring your own ideas for additional ways of approaching product discovery. They can be experimental, partially-formed, and theoretical. We’ll experiment with these alternative approaches to product discovery. We'll form questions for exploration, even continuing to explore these new ideas in small groups well beyond the end of the conference.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A
Attachments:

Speakers

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Spring

3:45pm

Surprise! Coaching leaders is DIFFERENT than coaching teams (Bob Galen)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Years ago I used to spend all of my coaching time team-ward thinking that it would have the biggest impact in agile transformations. It was also arguably an easier gig. But I’ve learned that the real direction to focus is upward in your coaching. That being said, I think most coaches are uncomfortable or under-skilled in effectively coaching upward.
I see four common anti-patterns:
  • We’re presumptuous and like to “tell” leaders what to do;
  • We marginalize their roles and lack empathy for the challenges surrounding their role change;
  • We lack credibility or experience in organizational leadership;
  • We either lack backbone or we’re too purist in our approaches.
This session will open by gathering attendee feedback on leadership coaching patterns that they’ve felt were successful. We’ll also gather your perspective on anti-patterns. Then we’ll compare these against my own experience gained from effectively coaching leaders over the past 10 years.
I hope we all exit the session empowered with new tools and insights into how to engage, partner with, and coach organizational managers and leaders.
Learning Outcomes:
  • We will jointly create a set of anti-patterns to avoid in coaching managers and leaders;
  • Conversely, we will also create a useful set of patterns and tools to assist in our coaching;
  • You will leave with a renewed focus on the “balance” and skills required for effective leadership coaching.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Bob Galen

Bob Galen

Principle Agile Coach, Velocity Partners
Agile Evangelist & Coach – Velocity Partners - Bob Galen is an Agile Methodologist, Practitioner & Coach based in Cary, NC. In this role he helps guide companies and teams in their pragmatic adoption and organizational shift towards Scrum and other agile methodologies and practices. He is a Principal Agile Evangelist at Velocity Partners, a leading agile nearshore development partner. He is also President and Agile Trainer & Coach at... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency VII

3:45pm

Cultivate Brainstorming Commandos for Creative Problem Solving!!!! (Pradeepa Narayanaswamy)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Brainstorming in its truest sense is intended to be a practical approach towards creative problem solving as a team. But, do you find that often the team members with dominant personalities hijack these meetings? Do your teams truly brainstorm 'outside the box'?
The term brainstorming, coined by Alex Osborn, is defined as "Using the brain to storm a creative problem…in commando fashion". Utilizing the team's collective creative power in your meetings is a powerful way to enhance collaboration and idea creation among team members.
In this highly practical workshop, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy will introduce the audience to a variety of brainstorming games. Attendees will practice and take back variety of ideas and concepts to facilitate a fun and effective brainstorming session.
To name a few, these games are intended to:
-- Get the creative juices flowing
-- Think outside the box
-- Comfortable with bad ideas
-- Identify and Zap negativity
This session is targeted towards Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches, Managers or any team members who are looking to add more facilitation tools to their tool belt and put them to immediate use in their teams and meetings.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Audience will:
  • --Learn and practice the true meaning, intent and principles of Brainstorming
  • --Understand the usage of games being a vehicle for engaging teams towards effective brainstorming
  • --Recognize the drawbacks of their traditional brainstorming practices
  • --Practice these games within the session as a medium to improve collaboration with their real life teams
  • --Apply these games to uplift their team’s capability to solve problems in a creative manner


Speakers
avatar for Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Pradeepa Narayanaswamy

Enterprise Agile Coach, Capgemini
As an Agile Coach, Trainer and Consultant, Pradeepa Narayanaswamy is a self-proclaimed “Agile Passionista” who strongly believes in the agile principles used in transforming organizations to build superior quality products. In her current role, Pradeepa works as an Trainer, Agile coach and mentor to several software development teams and help them succeed with building high quality products. She is also working with several leadership teams... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Dunwoody

3:45pm

Can We Deliver Mobile Apps Continuously? (Dan Waters)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Quality and fast feedback on mobile is a challenge! Developing mobile apps requires dealing with multiple platforms, OS versions, form-factors and resolutions, varying hardware capabilities and network conditions. At the same time, users have extremely high expectations for the mobile experience and will promptly punish with bad App Store reviews when disappointed. User expectations are set by fast-moving consumer apps such as Facebook, YouTube and Google Maps which deliver fast, responsive, quality apps with frequent release cycles.
At Xamarin, we believe that the way to higher quality and faster mobile release cycles is continuous delivery. In this talk, we show how to setup a continuous delivery pipeline for a small mobile app. We show you how fast (and fun) it is to write automated tests and to automatically run them in various deployments with each commit. We discuss benefits as well as some of the challenges that mobile developers face in establishing the "walking skeleton" deployment pipeline for mobile apps. The example pipeline is complemented with a few small but real-life case studies of companies who successfully have implemented continuous delivery for mobile.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding the benefits of continuous delivery for mobile apps
  • Concrete suggestions for first steps towards mobile app CD with a small up-front investment
  • Overview of the best automation tools to facilitate fast CD adoption
  • Changes to your app to support shifting to a continuous delivery process derived from real experience


Speakers

Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Learning Center

3:45pm

Agile Capitalization (Dan Greening)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
In many companies, agile software development is misunderstood and misreported, increasing taxes, volatility in profit and loss (P&L) and costly manual time-tracking. Agile and Scrum teams inherently create production cost data that are more verifiable, better documented, and more closely aligned with known customer value than most waterfall implementations. Better reporting can mean significant tax savings and greater investor interest.
Leave with the understanding and resources to lead an agile capitalization effort at your company. Save weeks of research and investigation by attending this powerful briefing. We will explore the theory, benefits, regulations, and real-world examples of capitalizing software developed using agile practices. You will learn from a member of the team that pioneered defensible agile capitalization practices in a $10B publicly traded company.
This talk revises the highly-rated Agile Capitalization talk at Agile 2015.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Improve the company’s P&L
  • Reduce or eliminate need to track actual hours
  • Free up working capital for innovation and growth in software development
  • Reduce future tax burden
  • Improve verifiability for internal and external auditors
  • Increase clarity for shareholders on investments and operational expenses


Speakers
avatar for Dan Greening

Dan Greening

Enterprise Coach, LeadingAgile
I teach, coach and consult on Scrum and agile management practices for CxOs and below. I have served in product and engineering leadership positions in startups and software enterprises. I focus on long-term value creation while implementing and sustaining agility. Unlike some colleagues, I strongly believe managers should add significant strategic value to agile companies. At the same time, I coach and teach engineering teams and departments, to... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Baker

3:45pm

Experiences Bringing Continuous Delivery to a DoD Project (Gene Gotimer)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Not every continuous delivery initiative starts with someone saying "drop everything. Let's do DevOps." Sometimes you have to grow your practice incrementally. And sometimes, you don’t set out to grow a practice at all-- you are just fixing problems with your process, trying to make things better.
I'll walk through a case study of how our team worked on an exemplar project for the Department of Defense to show that agile could work in a decidedly waterfall culture. I’ll also discuss techniques and tools we used to bring a DevOps mindset and continuous delivery practices into an environment that wasn't already agile.
I'll talk about how we were able to start in development, where we had the most control, with a "let's starting being agile" initiative and working on "why is continuous integration important?" From there, we tackled one problem after another, each time making the release a little easier and a little less risky. We incrementally brought our practices through other environments until the project was confidently delivering working, QA-tested, security-tested releases that were ready for production every two weeks. I’ll discuss the journey we took and the tools we used to get to build quality into our product, our releases, and our release process.
This session is aimed at people that are trying to adopt agile and continuous delivery, but might be worried that it can’t work in their particular environment due to the enterprise, the culture, or the regulations that surround them.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Continuous delivery isn’t a goal unto itself. It is a process to deliver better software faster.
  • Developing a CD pipeline should be about reducing the biggest risks and increasing confidence in your software quality.
  • Each problem you solve makes the process better, even if it uncovers more problems further down the pipeline.
  • Just making your release process better might take you down the road to continuous delivery-- it doesn’t have to be a deliberate effort to get to DevOps.
  • Agile and continuous delivery can succeed in environments that aren’t nimble and flexible by nature. Even the DoD can be agile.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gene Gotimer

Gene Gotimer

Senior Architect, Coveros
I am a senior architect at Coveros, Inc., a software company that uses agile methods to accelerate the delivery of secure, reliable software. As a consultant, I work with my customers build software better, faster, and more securely by introducing agile development and DevOps practices. I have many years of experience in web-based enterprise application design, and extensive experience establishing and using development ecosystems such as... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Lenox

3:45pm

Agile Leadership: Practical Steps to a Delicate Balance (Susan DiFabio)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
“Step up! Step back!”… “Be a leader! Empower the team!”… “Improve predictability! Embrace change!”… Are these messages making your head spin? You are not alone. Many people who are new to an Agile leadership role struggle to know what they are supposed to do when hearing these seemingly contradictory messages.
In this session we will take a pragmatic look at team-level leadership in an Agile environment. Whether you are a Scrum Master, a Product Owner, an administrative manager, or a leader without a title, leadership is a balancing act. We will discuss how easy it is to find yourself being pulled too far in one direction then another, and how to find an appropriate balance point.
This session will look at leadership in four focus areas – outcomes, process, people, and change. Within each focus area we will examine leadership engagement that is too little, too much, and just right.
You will come away with tangible ideas for "just right" involvement that you can implement immediately, as well as food for thought for longer-term changes.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to recognize the natural fluctuation between leadership that is too light and too heavy-handed
  • How to reframe leadership messages that may lead to extremes into messages that find the right balance
  • Tangible steps you can take as a balanced leader to enable an Agile team
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Susan DiFabio

Susan DiFabio

Agile Coach, Susan K DiFabio Consulting LLC
I am an independent Agile coach focused on helping teams and organizations find success applying Agile principles. I spent many years on project teams performing roles ranging from developer to designer to project manager to product manager. During that time I witnessed first-hand the success of iterative development as compared with waterfall processes and I experienced the importance of building relationships and valuing people. I am passionate... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Centennial 4

3:45pm

Women in Agile: I Want to See You Be Brave (Kara Minotti Becker)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Do you ever wonder what would happen if you say what you want to say?
Agile has the potential to completely upend traditional management hierarchies and cultures. In the promised land of the true Agile team, every member has an equal voice. Leadership is not owned by a person. Rather, it is found in a thousand moments of opportunity.
For some, and perhaps especially for women, that means we must hone our ability to step confidently into leadership opportunities and speak our minds openly. To do this, we must own our voices, our intelligence, and our power to lead. We must, in short, say what we want to say.
In this fully interactive workshop, begin to discover your authentic voice, through curiosity and safe experimentation. Explore the notion that by overly crafting, editing, and positioning our messages, women can rob the Agile team of our value as leaders, mentors, and coaches.
Be prepared to seek your own honest voice, and to listen and encourage as others discover theirs.
Women and men, outspoken or internal, all are welcome! I want to see you be brave.
Learning Outcomes:
  • One specific action that you personally can take to step into an upcoming leadership opportunity and speak your mind with increased confidence.
  • Honest, kind and safe peer feedback as you experiment with different communication styles and tactics.
  • A broadened perspective and increased awareness of your options for communicating your ideas and opinions, as a leader and team member as well as outside of work.
  • Specific tactics for that most difficult of circumstances: publicly challenging the ideas of your peers.
  • A new network of informal coaching buddies.
Attachments:

Speakers
KM

Kara Minotti Becker

Regional Agile Delivery Lead - New England, Eliassen Group


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover DE

3:45pm

Objectivity or subjectivity? Owning your bias and interactions (Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Teams are diverse entities with different backgrounds, experiences, and opinions. This diversity leads to bias-influenced interactions among team members, whether they realize the influence or not. The behaviors and resulting decisions made because of implicit or explicit bias have their own consequences to teams and projects alike. These consequences and biases are more visible retrospectively, but how do we encourage and empower people to understand how the judgments they make wholly affect their behavioral interactions?
This session will discuss the the idea of cognitive bias, both implicit and explicit, using several examples from well known studies, smaller research observations, and individual experiences. A facilitated discussion will be conducted to discuss how the example perceptions and situations, as well as participant's own experiences, influence behaviors and interactions with others. By talking openly about bias, participants will learn approaches to dissect their rationale and motivations in order to make decisions which are less emotionally charged and more objective. Participants will leave with a self-defined plan to help interpret their judgments and realizations to continue practicing mindful bias exploration in their lives.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify current (and future) implicit and explicit biases acquired from experiences or societal influences
  • Interpret how implicit and explicit biases can influence behaviors, decisions, and interactions
  • Decompose judgments to distinguish root cause through self-awareness
  • Use discussion takeaways and question framework to continually recognize how bias influences thought processes in future interactions


Speakers
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Agile Transformation Coach, Salesforce.com
Talk to me about Women In Agile, Metrics, Agile UX, value mapping and Agile in large retail and sales organizations. | | Also check out the #WomenInAgile session on Sunday July 24 prior to the conference and register to attend! Be the change you want to see! https://t.co/A9rekeyuyl


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Fairlie

3:45pm

What Are You Seeing That I'm Not Seeing?: Developing Empathy Skill (Andrew Annett, Susan Johnston)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Empathy - a core element of design thinking and a precondition for high-performance teams.
We instinctively recognize the impact of empathy - or more often its absence - but how do we develop this skill?
And what are we talking about when we use the word empathy - which of the eight recognized types matter most to us at work?
Join Andrew and Sue to explore and experience how this these questions can be resolved with tools such as the Empathy Toy. In an agile context, this has proven useful for:
  • aligning product management, designers and customers
  • generating common understanding amongst new team members (i.e., liftoff)
  • improving skills at conflict resolution between team members
  • generally improving communication amongst stakeholders.
What to expect:
A customized minds-on session that explores the specific challenge of developing empathy skill
A group play session that provide opportunities to observe and practice skills that are difficult to teach
Facilitated debrief session that helps you draw parallels between the game and your own work
Multiple opportunities to reflect on how to apply empathy, creative dialogue, and self-assessment in your work
Using the Empathy Toy as an example, we will demonstrate ways to create a shared experience that touches on communication, cognitive empathy and creating alignment between people and within teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will leave the session with:
  • A clear understanding of the different types of empathy
  • A new set of responses to ineffective collaboration
  • Inspiration to try tools like the Empathy Toy and others to foster team learning
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Annett

Andrew Annett

Lean/Agile Coach, Leaninntuit
Andrew is a coach and facilitator who is passionate about helping teams improve product delivery. He is focused on promoting shared understanding through better communication practices.He joined the agile community having survived a career of big-plan-up-front development and transformation programs in large financial institutions. Along the way he was distracted by involvement in startups and some unusual infrastructure projects and developing... Read More →
avatar for Susan Johnston

Susan Johnston

Coach and Trainer, It's Understood / Leanintuit
I help you talk so people listen, listen so people talk and change the world one conversation at a time. A professional coach and trainer, my specialty is interaction at work, particularly as it applies to workplace change. | | I enjoy helping technical people learn the skills of coaching and facilitation that will make them more effective at work. (My learning programs are accredited by ICAgile.) | | Based in Waterloo, Ontario, I'm... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency V

3:45pm

Scaling Product Development: More Product Learning without More Process Focus (David Hussman)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Many companies working hard to be more agile have a strong focus on process but failing to focus on product. This session’s focus is on product over process or project. Differing from sessions about scaling process, we will talk transitioning to product learning by building product teams and product communities. As a vehicle, we will discuss scaling product development in context of three models: one team, one product, many teams and one product, and many teams and a large system (where product varies based on configuration. For each model, we will talk about embracing uncertainty, focusing on measurable impact and accelerating product learning with agile practices and DevOps techniques. The session is for people looking to transition to a product focus and will be helpful individuals, team leads, product managers and anyone looking to evolve from more process to more product and eventually to more impact and more product learning possibly without adding process and by possibly building less of the wrong thing.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - Having strong process skills is a good starting point.
  • - Shift from process to product (product transformations)
  • - How to keep process down as program size grows
  • - Show how DevOps tools can accelerate product learning
  • - Introduce product discovery tools at scale
  • - Show ways to blend product discovery and product delivery within and across teams


Speakers
avatar for David Hussman

David Hussman

Founder, DevJam
I split my time between leading DevJam and coaching at client sites. My coaching ranges from small teams to large enterprises and entails working with teams, programs and leadership groups. Some days I am doing discovery work, teaching product thinking and agile design and augmenting real agility with user centered design and user experience tools. Other days I am deep in the delivery space helping teams adapt agile methods to meet their needs... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Centennial 1

3:45pm

Virtuous Metrics - Most metrics are the devil. Be an angel. (Adam Weisbart)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The Agile Manifesto tells us “Working software is the primary measure of progress”, but when pressed by management to report on our progress we often fall back on non-agile metrics and measures that hurt our team and organization.
As Deming pointed out “the most important figures that one needs for management are unknown or unknowable, but successful management must nevertheless take account of them.”
Most metrics can be gamed, focus on the wrong things, or are downright harmful. There are however Virtuous Metrics that enforce behaviors that are helpful to agility, provided they're focused on by the right people.
During this session, we’ll learn about Virtuous Metrics that will help your team self-organize and your organization become more agile through a game that simulates your team going through several sprints and releases. You’ll leave this session with a framework for employing Virtuous Metrics in your organization for continuous improvement.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn why most metrics are useless or damaging to an Agile team
  • Discover what metrics help teams and organizations improve
  • Find out how to get management interested and involved in helping teams remove impediments
  • Learn an approach to gaining stakeholder alignment so your organization can move in the right direction
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Adam Weisbart

Adam Weisbart

Corporate Agilist, Weisbart Consulting, Inc
Adam is a passionate Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Coach based in San Francisco. He has created several training modules including Build Your Own Scrum which is used by trainers around the world to teach Scrum from the back of the room. He's the creator of the viral video "Sh*t Bad Scrum Masters Say", the baker of Retrospective Cookies, and author of the upcoming book Agile Antipatterns: The Scrum Master's Guide to Traps, Tripwires... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency VI

3:45pm

Ron & Chet's Stalwarts Session (Ron Jeffries, Chet Hendrickson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We will engage in a public chat, addressing your topics about all aspects of Agile Software Development. Our primary interests include:
  • The importance of solid developer skills including TDD, refactoring, ATDD, and pair programming;
  • The use of a tested, releasable software increment to aid communication between developers and business people;
  • Single-product focus, and feature team focus, as ways of avoiding high-overhead so-called "Scaling" approaches.
We'll talk with you about most anything. Team-level issues are our primary interest.
Learning Outcomes:
  • *Ideas for self-improvement
  • *Ideas for better teamwork
  • *People not to grow up to be like


Speakers
CH

Chet Hendrickson

HendricksonXP
RJ

Ron Jeffries

www.xprogramming.com


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Inman

3:45pm

Foundations of Quality (Paul Carvalho)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Quality. You know it when you see it, right? How does your agile team know how to build high quality with a definition like that?
There's good news and bad news. The bad news is that your team won't usually know in advance what quality means - they can only guess. The good news is that Agile development practices have mechanisms in place to help you work it out.
In this interactive workshop you will explore the underlying principles and foundations that will help you understand and define Quality. Come practice exercises you can bring back to your teams to help accelerate their learning towards customer satisfaction.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand the Quality paradox
  • The role of individuals and interactions
  • Defining Quality
  • Applications in Scrum
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Paul Carvalho

Paul Carvalho

Agile Coach, Trainer, Quality Driven Inc.
Paul is a Testing expert, Agile coach, interactive teacher, Rubyist, comic relief, and efficiency enthusiast with over 20 years of experience in various domains. A Quality consultant by trade, Paul helps companies deliver world-class value. Beware: his eyes sparkle when he talks about Testing and his passion is infectious. Paul is the author of the forthcoming book \"Put Your Mind To The Test.\"


Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover FG

3:45pm

Informing Design Sprints with User Research (Timothy Boyd)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Design sprints are a tremendously useful process for solving specific product problems through design, prototyping, and validation with real users. But if you don't bring the right research to the table and involve team members effectively you're missing out on opportunities to align your team and ensure the results of your sprint can be integrated into your product development process.
What kind of research do you share with the team? How is it presented and bubbled up each step of the way? What do you do when your users don't show up?
This talk will present proven methods for informing the design sprint with research, conducting new & effective research during the sprint process, and using the week to build empathy for users with your team, from product managers to engineers to designers and beyond.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn what types of research you need to bring in for a successful design sprint.
  • Learn effective techniques for framing the conversation in terms of user needs to get the team aligned during unpacking.
  • Learn who should own research throughout a sprint and how to resource for this.
  • Learn how you can turn a design sprint into an opportunity to create more empathy, building the research focus and competency of your organization.


Speakers
avatar for Timothy Boyd

Timothy Boyd

FanDuel



Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover C

3:45pm

The Four Fictional Faces of Scaled Stakeholder Management (Drew Jemilo)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Many stakeholder management frameworks lack a fundamental human element. Focusing only on stakeholder power, influence, interest, and availability fails to get at the heart of real implementation efforts - human connection, and the interpersonal obstacles that govern how we work together. Some typical scenarios:
Meet Tiffany. She's the Senior VP of Product Management whose travel schedule is overbooked and who's inbox is a labyrinth fast-moving company decisions and information. Over lunch with a client in China, she quickly responds with healthy skepticism on her mobile between courses, bringing a once-smooth release screeching to a halt.
Meet Sanjay. He's an underslept Project Manager who has just welcomed his first daughter. Both his family and work demands have tripled in the last week, which often puts him out-of-the-loop on vital information. He calls frequent one-hour meetings to hear the latest buzz about the lean-agile transformation, unintentionally clogging up the works.
Meet Felipe. He's the Senior VP of Engineering who owns the enterprise transformation and knows his upcoming promotion depends on its success. This drives him forward in ways that can often isolate his team.
Meet Lin. After crunching numbers, Lin is vocal about reality vs. expectations and proposes a different strategy. You've never worked with Lin, but she has unwittingly shut down your entire plan for this release.
How do you deal with this plethora of personalities? In this session, you'll learn a stakeholder management framework which has been used successfully in many transformations, small and large. Based on where a stakeholder falls within one of four quadrants, you'll be able to tune your interactions for success.
Learn the secret of identifying your own Tiffany, Sanjay, Felipe, and Lin… and WIN!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Classify stakeholders into the four basic stakeholder groups
  • Identify communication methods best suited for each group
  • Implement a stakeholder management plan
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Drew Jemilo

Drew Jemilo

CTO, Scaled Agile, Inc.
Drew is an enterprise Agile consultant, a principal contributor to the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe), and a Scaled Agile Academy instructor. After starting his career at Anderson Consulting in the late 80s and early 90s, he moved to Van Kampen Funds, a subsidiary of Morgan Stanley, where he used early adaptive methods to define and build new software products and to migrate off their legacy systems. Following that, he joined a private startup... Read More →



Tuesday July 26, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Piedmont

4:30pm

Growing an Open, Participative, Horizontal and based on Trust Company (Hernan Wilkinson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
10Pines is an Argentine Software company that was founded with the Agile values in mind. It is an open, participative, without hierarchies and based on trust company. In this experienced report, I'll show you the reasons and personal experiences that lead us to create a company based on those values, the problems we encountered and how we solved them, the benefits of this kind of company and of course, the challenges we are facing. As "trailer" I would like to mention that at this point in my professional life, I can not conceive other type of organization where I could work, there is no turning back after being part of a company of this kind.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • People must be trusted
  • People must be empowered to get the best from them
  • No hierarchical organizations work great for software development companies
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hernan Wilkinson

Hernan Wilkinson

Founding Partner, Coach and Developer, 10Pines
Hernan Wilkinson graduated in Computer Sciences from the Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales at UBA. He has been teaching Object Oriented Programming and Advanced Design with Objects in the same University for more than fourteen years and also at the industry through 10Pines. He also teaches Software Engineering II at the same faculty. He has been working as a programmer, architect, technology and development manager in different companies... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Kennesaw

5:30pm

Industry Analyst Panel Discussion: Agile Trends and Future Directions (James Newkirk)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Hear from leading industry analysts as they discuss the latest trends and emerging best practices around Agile software development. Learn how the most successful software organizations are utilizing Agile to drive business performance. Find out how the latest innovations in Agile practices continue to mature as development organizations deploy Agile further across the enterprise.
This year's theme is Agile Trends and Future Directions. Join us to hear unique perspectives and gain industry knowledge from this year's participants.
Moderator:
Jim Newkirk VP Cloud Development at CenturyLink
Panel Participants:
  • Rebecca Parsons, CTO at Thoughtworks
  • Tom Grant, Senior Consultant at Net Objectives
  • Ray Arell, Founder and Principal Coach at nuCognitive
  • Steve Denning, Author and Independent Management Consulting Professional
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn how the most successful software organizations are utilizing Agile to drive business performance
  • Find out how the latest innovations in Agile Practices continue to mature as development organizations deploy Agile further across the enterprise


Speakers
avatar for James Newkirk

James Newkirk

VP of Service Engineering, CenturyLink Cloud
As Tier 3's vice president of engineering, James oversees the development of Tier 3's cloud management platform. He brings almost 30 years experience in the software industry. Prior to Tier 3, James held senior leadership roles at Microsoft, Caradigm (GE/Microsoft Joint Venture) and ThoughtWorks. Earlier in his career he co-founded Object Mentor Inc with Robert C. Martin, a consulting firm that specialized in training and mentoring their... Read More →


Tuesday July 26, 2016 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Centennial 1
 
Wednesday, July 27
 

8:30am

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss? Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment. We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join!

Wednesday July 27, 2016 8:30am - 9:00am
Grand Hall Foyer

9:00am

Modern Agile (Joshua Kerievsky)
Abstract:
Over the past decade, innovative companies, software industry thought leaders and lean/agile pioneers have discovered simpler, sturdier, and more streamlined ways to be agile. While there is timeless wisdom in agile, today's practitioners would do well to bypass outmoded agile practices in favor of modern approaches.

Modern agile methods are defined by four guiding principles
  • Make people awesome
  • Make safety a prerequisite
  • Experience & learn rapidly
  • Deliver value continuously
World famous organizations like Google, Amazon, Air BnB, Etsy and others are living proof of the powers of these four principles. However, you don't need to be a name brand company to leverage modern agile wisdom. 

In this talk, Josh will explain what he means by modern agility, share real-world modern agile stories, show how modern agile addresses key risks while targeting results over rituals, and reveal how the 2001 agile manifesto can be updated to reflect modern agile's four guiding principles.

Speakers

Wednesday July 27, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Centennial Ballroom

10:45am

Agile marketing: a new reality! (Marie-Christine Legault)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Every business needs to be able to keep up with market changes in the face of widespread upheaval. Maintaining organisationnal agility isn’t easy, especially for large companies with an international outlook.
While there are plenty of marketing examples of industries that have been up-ended as a result of new competitors and changing conditions, there are also many that have managed to respond to these changes.
Among these is McDonald’s – one of the world’s largest and most iconic fast food brands that reinvented itself by focusing on people, coffee, agility and innovation.
YOU HAVE TO DEVELOP A DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE TO COMPETE – McCAFÉ
This experience report will step beyond traditional marketing methods à la “Mad Men” and share what was discovered with the McCafé launch - the presentation has useful learnings about agile marketing techniques to help participants gain insight and develop important skills.
This talk is centered around the McCafé concept, development stages and collaborative drivers. Marie-Christine’s personal hands on marketing experience for the McCafé project will provide participants a unique outlook on process, and discover how to bridge the gap between IT, marketing and the business. It’s a fundamental shift in mindset. Instead of focusing on what you can sell, the focus is shifted to what are the needs while leveraging rapid iterations for maximum output.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Learning Outcomes:
  • - Steps to take when considering implementing an Agile marketing framework
  • - How to share and promote Agile marketing processes in non traditional environments and organizations
  • - Ways to support clients, staff while pulling them through the transition to Agile marketing
  • - How to be sharp, consistent and strong when getting push back from partners and existing staff
  • - How a good idea, vulnerability and humility go a long way when working with a client, an advertising agency collaborating for a huge group and product transition.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Marie-Christine Legault

Marie-Christine Legault

Vice President, Business development & Partnerships, Pyxis Technologies
She aims to spread the Agile message and promote Pyxis... via creating connections, events, new ideas and fun opportunities. Curious and generous, that's the way MC's eyes see and discover with a very "out-of-the-box" practice that will allow her to play at Pyxis and dream. The "sky" is her limit and guide to successes, best roads... in order to achieve and reach for the stars!


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 11:15am
Kennesaw

10:45am

Introduction to Agile Enterprise Transitions (Hendrik Esser)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Introducing Agile on team level is a quite well solved challenge. However, “scaling” agile on enterprise level is hard: there are a couple of proposed approaches and thousands of opinions about them. What advice to listen to?

Many (if not all) organizations struggle with the enterprise transition challenge. The reason is that - though there are very similar practical challenges in different companies - the company and leadership cultures vary a lot. Due to that, what works for one organization, likely will not exactly work for another.
In this talk we will look at how you can identify your approach to your enterprise transition towards Agile. We will also look at some approaches that have worked in several companies and thus might be good for you to look at or try out. And I will share some common pitfalls and challenges and how to deal with them.
During the talk I will share my own experiences from the agile transition of the company I am working at (>20000 people in R&D) and the insights I got from working as a Program Director for the Agile Alliance’s “Supporting Agile Adoption” initiative, connecting to Agile Change leaders from many different companies.
Learning Outcomes:
  • You will learn a method how to identify your own potentially successful approaches to your agile transition.
  • You will learn about several good practices that you might try out at your company.
  • You will learn about common pitfalls and how to deal with them.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

VP, Operations and Programs, Ericsson
Growing up in the 1980s, Hendrik was passionate computer game developer and active in a computer club giving programming lessons. After getting his diploma in Electrical engineering he started at Ericsson as a SW developer and grew into technical coordination and System Development roles. A broad interest in people and management of large organizations brought him into management roles, starting as a project manager, later heading Systems- and... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover AB

10:45am

Wait. What does self-organizing even mean? - Première Partie (Alex Harms)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The famous manifesto says we should
"Build projects around motivated individuals.
Give them the environment and support they need,
and trust them to get the job done."
Sometimes, these people are referred to as a self-organized team.
Self-organizing, as a term drawn from science, means some pretty clear things in the world of nature. But we don’t have mathematical models of how self-organizing works in teams. Is it a metaphor? What actually happens when a team self-organizes? What do we do that either encourages or discourages it?
And what do you do when the team hasn't self-organized in a way you like? Does self-organizing guarantee success? What do you do to help a team self-organize into something productive rather than, say, a dysfunctional family?
This session is a place for us to explore these and other questions, together. Let’s see if we can come up with some more concrete and practical ways to understand the idea of self-organized teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers

Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Spring

10:45am

How to Work Personality Issues Without Sounding Like a Marriage Guidance Counsellor? (Hans Samios)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Ever had a situation on a team where personalities are such that they are unable to work an issue? It happens all the time, doesn't it? I don't know about you but I've found that the advice for dealing with these situations is often very "touchy, feely" to the point where I feel I am being asked to become something I am not - something like a marriage guidance counsellor. Worse, I have found working this way creates an additional barrier and actually gets in the way of working the issue. I think this is because of the personalities that I am working with - people who see themselves as more analytical and introverted - but I suspect this is also partly an expression of my discomfort in using approaches that do not fit in with my personality. In either case, different "tools" are required to get good results.
The overall theme of this session is the development of approaches that are "experimental", "observational" and "data-driven". These approaches help drain negative emotional input to addressing the issue at hand while allowing the issue to be worked and resolved. The basis of the workshop is a presentation of thinking, ideas and approaches that I have used. Table exercises will be used to generate additional understanding as well as gather up experiences and approaches that you have.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Increased understanding on how to think about these complex issues.
  • Increased "toolbox" of ideas and approaches you can apply to your situations.
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency V

10:45am

Stop talking to a Brick Wall - how culture impacts conversations about Agile (Peter Green, Jake Calabrese)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Many Agile advocates struggle to convince others in the organization of its benefits. "Why can't they just see how this better - it seems so obvious!". At best, this results in a slow adoption of Agile principles and practices. At worst, frustration and misunderstanding makes people resistant to Agile in general.
In this session, we will start by explaining what's behind the common cultural stage frameworks, including the color models described in Spiral Dynamics and the related Laloux culture framework. Maybe you've heard about these colors, and are wondering how that can help you in your efforts to increase the level of Agile adoption in your organization.
After the introduction to the color models, we will use examples from our own work, as well as some persona based role playing, to explore how people's dominant worldview affects what they hear when you're talking about agile, and your ability to say what you intend.
Agile provides compelling benefits for people with each of the dominant worldviews (colors). The challenge is that it's difficult to see the world how others see it. Come to this engaging session where you'll have a chance to experience each of these perspectives and will walk away with some ideas of how to better reach your Agile goals.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * Describe various cultural stage models like Spiral, Laloux, etc.
  • * Explore how people and organizations from different cultural perspectives see the world and value different things
  • * Describe the benefits of an Agile approach from multiple different perspectives
Attachments:


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Centennial 4

10:45am

The Journey from Monolith to Microservices: A Guided Adventure (Mike Gehard)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are you starting a new application and wondering whether to go with a monolith or take the microservices path? Do you have an existing application that is getting too big to deliver business value with a predictable velocity? Ever wonder how to regain the agility you had when an application that was smaller?
The current discussions around application architecture with microservices seem like an all or nothing journey without any stops along the way to catch your breath. This talk outlines questions to ask yourself to drive decisions along the way.
It also demonstrates one possible path for future growth, complete with intermediate stops along the way where you can catch your breath and evaluate your next step. This path avoids implementing too much complexity early in the process.
At the end of the journey you will not only have ideas to guide your own journey but tools that you can use to make the journey easier and less costly.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * Understanding of costs and benefits of microservices
  • * An evolutionary path from monoliths to microservices.
  • * An understanding of the benefits of the steps along the way.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mike Gehard

Mike Gehard

Software Engineer, Pivotal
Mike heads up the content development group within Pivotal's Education team. He also serves on the Pivotal Labs practices council as the lead technical representative. Previous experience includes working on the Spring Cloud Services team as well as a Labs consultant. He loves speaking at conferences and sharing his knowledge with others.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Learning Center

10:45am

The Science Of Troubleshooting (Shawn Button)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We are about launch our latest feature to the eager public, when suddenly we get the call all developers dread: The Site is down! Our business is pressuring us to quickly fix the site, but we can’t even find the problem! We pick up the red phone and call Karen, the fixer. She calmly spends five minutes typing, and announces that she found the problem, and everything is back to normal. Where would we be without Karen? How can we get these skills on the rest of the team, so anyone can work the magic she does?
It turns out that troubleshooting is a learnable skill. Join Shawn and Chris as the explore the Science of Troubleshooting. This workshop will examine what is happening during effective problem solving. It will examine types of scientific reasoning, and explore how we are using them to solve problems, sometimes without even realizing what we are doing! Participants will see how, by using scientific reasoning and experiments to build and test hypotheses about the problems, they can greatly increase the effectiveness of their troubleshooting and debugging. By making the process explicit even consummate problem solvers can improve how they approach and solve problems. Using the awareness gained attendees can guide others to improve their problem-solving skills.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding types of scientific reasoning
  • A useful model for the process of troubleshooting
  • Language and practices that can be used with your team to help them gain these skills


Speakers
avatar for Shawn Button

Shawn Button

Agile Coach, Leanintuit
Shawn is an expert in Agile development practices and Agile/Lean Coach, with the proven ability to help individuals, teams, and enterprises adopt better ways of working. Shawn has found that Agile and Lean are most effective when they are based in trust and respect for the people doing the work. He believes that we are in the first stages of a revolution that will someday result in a new work norm, where people are universally valued, empowered... Read More →



Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Dunwoody

10:45am

Failing @ Scaling: Don't Panic, and Carry a Towel (Em Campbell-Pretty)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Struggling with agile at scale? Thinking about scaling agile beyond the team? Want to learn from others mistakes? Well don’t panic, and carry a towel. After all “any man who can hitch the length and breadth of the Galaxy, rough it, slum it, struggle against terrible odds, win through and still know where his towel is , is clearly a man to be reckoned with.”
There is a lot to be learnt from those who have successfully Hitchhiked their way to the galaxy of Scaled Agile, but there is also much to learn from those who have gotten a little lost upon the way. This session celebrates the scaled agile hitchhiker, the people who tried and failed, with ideas that were occasionally brilliant but often plain stupid. You will laugh, you will cry but you will also walk away will a nice long list of ideas not to try when scaling agile!
Learning Outcomes:
  • 7 failure patterns in scaling agile
  • An understanding of why these patterns lead to less than optimal results
  • Tips on how to avoid falling into these failure patterns


Speakers
avatar for Em Campbell-Pretty

Em Campbell-Pretty

Partner, Context Matters
Em is a Partner at Context Matters, Australia's leading Enterprise Agile consultancy. After close to 20 years in business management roles within multinational blue chip corporations, Em discovered Agile and became passionate about the chance it provides to align business and IT around the delivery of value. In 2012, she launched Australia’s first Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) Agile Release Train. The story of the cultural transformation that... Read More →



Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover DE

10:45am

Guiding Agile Cultural Adaptation At Scale (Ebenezer Ikonne)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Many approaches to scaling Agile focus primarily on the adoption of common Agile practices at the team level. While this important, it's important to remember that Agile is a set of values and principles (defined in the Agile Manifesto). Effectively scaling Agile in organizations means that Agile principles and values need to be adopted throughout the organization and this often means that a cultural transformation needs to take place. To faciliate culture change, we must understand culture, its levels and how it can be influenced and changed. Agile transformations often stall because those leading the transformation fail to view it through the lens of culture. This session provides Agile change management techniques for Agile change leaders, change agents and anyone interested in leading or participating in Agile adoption in an organization.
Learning Outcomes:
  • The attendee should understand Agile at scale as the adoption of Agile values and principles throughout the the organization
  • The attendee should be able to observe Agile culture through the lens of the Schein model.
  • The attendee should have tools for identifying artifacts, values and tacit assumptions in their organizations.
  • The attendee should be able to recognize the different subcultures in their organization.
  • The attendee should be able to create a plan for leading Agile culture change in their organization.
  • The attendee should be able to assess and evaluate the degree of Agile culture adoption in their organization.
Attachments:

Speakers

Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Courtland

10:45am

From Agile Coach & Trainer, to CEO, Should I Follow My Own $%*!@ Advice? (Anthony Montgomery, David Bulkin)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
What happens when you go from agile coach, trainer and practitioner to CEO; will you follow the advice you have given management for years, or will your new role, and increased authority, give you a different perspective? Come to this interactive workshop and see an agile transformation through the eyes of a CEO, guessing what decisions he makes and learning from the real results of those decisions.
Anthony Montgomery was a successful agile coach and trainer. But now he is the CEO of a plan-driven, organization that had been run for the last 25 years by a traditional manager. Anthony could use his positional authority, and tell people what to do, but he is trying a softer approach to grow a collaborative, trusting, leader-leader culture from the bottom up.
We will walk through highlights of the organization's journey to agile through the lens of a CEO. Our session will be an interactive workshop, not a lecture! You will learn what Anthony saw and thought, you will guess what decision he made, find out the path taken, learn the consequences and gain practical insights that you can use with your own transformation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • How to use an agile approach to become agile
  • How to increase transparency, build trust, create a collaborative culture
  • The recognition of culture change as the foundation for success in a transformation
  • How to balance the short term delivery needs of the organization with long-term transformational change
  • How to adjust behaviors and culture through the use of process
  • Transform towards agile in a holistic manner that encompasses sales, marketing, finance as well as IT
Attachments:

Speakers
DB

David Bulkin

Managing Directior, Grow-Lean LLC
David Bulkin is the Managing Director at Grow-Lean where he delivers training and coaching to clients in North America, Australia, India, Europe and Africa. David is a part time agile editor at InfoQ, and co-founder of the Agile Leadership Network of NJ. David has 30 years experience delivering software and systems and has been applying agile methods for 14 years across the entire value stream from strategy and product ideation to development and... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover FG

10:45am

Managers and the Land of the Lost (Steve Martin, Tiffany Willis)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
There’s quite a bit of guidance and literature for Teams to know what to do in order to adopt and execute Agile practices and principles. Nowadays, it’s even more commonplace for Executives to be offered similar workshops, so they have an idea how to support the Teams. But what about the Managers?
From experiences in the field, Managers are often forgotten, or just lumped in with the teams. With confusing phrases such as self-organization and Servant Leadership bumping up against traditional management beliefs and demands from non-trained Executives in Scrum, it’s no wonder Managers can feel a bit like they’ve entered into the Land of the Lost.
In this interactive session, come learn an exercise you can perform back at your organization to help clarify roles and responsibilities of the management layer. Your managers will gain clarity on what they should be doing and what they should be passing on to help not only their teams perform better, but the organization as well. Equip your managers with the knowledge to help them no longer be lost.
As a bonus, the great thing about this Roles exercise, is that it can be used beyond the Managers. It’s been applied at both the Team and Executive layers as well.
Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Recognition of common challenges to Managers in Agile environments today. It’s not just you - your colleagues are also feeling it.
  • 2. An exercise you can perform with your Management team back at your organization to help them define/clarify what their role should be.
  • 3. Understanding of several leadership characteristics Managers should consider.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Steve Martin

Steve Martin

Sr Program Manager - Methodology & Governance, Pegasystems
With 20+ years’ experience, in Steve’s current role, he helps manage the Agile Methodology Approach for delivering Pegasystems engagements. Steve is a seasoned mentor and facilitator at all levels within companies, from executives to managers to delivery teams. He brings calmness and focus during turbulent transitions, partnering with organizations to reinvent their processes, approaches, and change their culture. Steve has a proven track... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency VI

10:45am

Self-Experimentation: Radical Continuous Learning (Thomas Perry)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Have you ever struggled to convince a team that your ideas have merit? How can you tell if the change you proposed at the last retrospective will actually pay off? How can we build a mindset of experimentation into team behavior? What if there were a powerful way to demonstrate through your own actions the legitimacy (or fallacy) of your ideas?
Self experimentation offers us a way to test out our ideas and demonstrate their validity. It offers us a way to demonstrate, through modeling the desired behavior, a mindset of experimentation and validation. Self-experimentation has a long history in disciplines like psychology, chemistry and medicine.
Tom Perry shares strategies for setting up self-experiments of your own. Starting with identifying antecedent behaviors, definition of the reinforcement and other behavior modification mechanisms, with hands on examples he teaches how we can use self-experimentation to improve our own performance as well as our teams.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Teach people about self-experimentation and how it works
  • Collectively create a constellation of ideas for experiments that everyone can use to improve
  • Provide a set of custom designed experiments for each individual
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Perry

Thomas Perry

Sr. Principal Transformation Coach, CA
Tom has been working in software development for over 20 years. He has worked on teams at startup companies, large corporations in the Fortune 100 and the State and Federal Government. His background includes testing, development, project/program management, agile coaching/mentoring and training. As part of his involvement in the greater agile community, he led the Seattle eastside chapter of the APLN. Tom speaks at a wide variety of software... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Regency VII

10:45am

Lightning Talk - People, Process & Technology
Limited Capacity full

Lightning Talks features short high-impact presentations from a variety of speakers:

  • What does a good Developer Experience (DX) look like? - Phillip            Rogers
  • 50 icons in 5 minutes - Lynne Cazaly
  • DevOps for Embedded Medical Devices         -Jeffery Payne
  • How can DevOps be implemented with Lean and Agile? - Ravi Tadwalkar
  • The Need to Align Software Services like Software Toolchains - Zubin Irani
  • The 7 Most Valuable Leadership Behaviors for Leading Change - Richard Knaster
  • Portfolio WIP: Too many projects, not enough people - Joe Vallone






Speakers
avatar for Michael Sahota

Michael Sahota

Guide & Certified Enterprise Coach, Agilitrix (Independent Consultant)
I believe people deliver astounding results when they have Passion and Purpose. Joy and Meaning. Creativity, Safety, Trust and Belonging. I believe we can foster work environments where people can grow and evolve to unleash their best every day. | | I help people cultivate their organizational culture. To invite a more conscious way of being and relating. To evolve organizational structures and practices that foster new ways of working... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Lenox

10:45am

From Vision to Execution: Linking Strategy to Action with Hoshin Kanri (Jorgen Hesselberg)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
As companies continue to evolve towards more agile ways of working, we're seeing significant benefits: teams are delivering value with higher levels of quality, faster than ever, and with levels of engagement not seen before. Yet, a common challenge continues to appear: although teams may be doing great, the direct link to high level strategic objectives is often missed, resulting in confusion, lack of strategic direction and waste.
Hoshin Kanri is a strategy deployment tool aimed at solving this particular problem. Through interactive exercises and group-based business case solving, this workshop will give executives, managers and team members a common language and a concrete methodology to link strategy to execution and understand what they need to leverage Hoshin Kanri in their own organizations.
Learning Outcomes:
  • * Understand how to more effectively link corporate strategy to work at the team level
  • * Create a holistic view of how end-to-end value is realized throughout the organization
  • * Instill a common language and concrete techniques to trace vision with action that's complementary with agile ways of working
  • * Help you more effectively communicate value with a broader audience in your organization
Attachments:

Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Hanover C

10:45am

Unconventional Agility: Beyond Dogma (Brandon Carlson)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
You’re Agile. You talk the talk and walk the walk. For example, you have retrospectives. just like the 12th principle of the Agile Manifesto says: “At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.” Why is it then does your Agile implementation look remarkably similar to everyone else’s? Many of the practices associated with Scrum or SAFe or even XP tend to be taken as doctrinal necessities of agile practice and are sacred. What would your process and culture be like if you applied another of the Agile principles to your organization. You know, this one that seems all too forgotten: “Simplicity -- Maximizing the amount of work not done is essential.” One organization did just that and Tim and Brandon will show you the real benefits that can be gained from radical and surprising simplifications of the process. Far from promoting defiance or forcing compliance we learned to reach better degrees of cooperation, flow, and (yes, the P word) productivity through radical simplification.
Could the same happen for you?
Learning Outcomes:
  • Consider adaptations beyond "conformance" to XP and Scrum
  • Reconsider your best practices
  • Evaluate changes according to your needs
  • Appreciate more profound questions than "how to implement X"


Speakers
avatar for Brandon Carlson

Brandon Carlson

IT Nerd, Lean TECHniques, Inc.
A self-proclaimed nerd with over 15 years of experience, Brandon has become passionate about elevating the performance of IT as a whole, and has helped numerous organizations from startups to Fortune 100 companies improve their product development and delivery systems. Brandon’s current interests include data-driven product definition/development and professionalism in the world of IT. He can be reached on Twitter and pretty much everywhere... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Centennial 1

10:45am

Arlo Belshee's Stalwarts Session (Arlo Belshee)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
**
Learning Outcomes:
  • **


Speakers
avatar for Arlo Belshee

Arlo Belshee

Sr. Program Mgr, Microsoft
Arlo helps you change cultures in large organizations. He transitions hundreds or thousands of people at a time to full technical and cultural prowess in a way that sticks. | | More importantly, Arlo gives your company the ability to change its own culture. He seeks to be the last consultant you will ever need to hire. After 6 months, you should be able to adapt your culture, practices, and company structures to meet novel challenges, each... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Inman

10:45am

Talk The Walk - Using Language to Improve Testing (Eric Jacobson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Craftspeople from all disciplines refine their language to sharpen their knowledge and communicate precisely about the way they work. A handful of practitioners have worked to expand testing language but most testers have not learned to adopted it. Some testers even reject the necessity to improve their language skills, choosing instead to perpetuate misunderstandings. We can either start improving the way we talk about testing, or continue fooling people into believing testing does not require skill.
In this session, I’ll teach you testing-related language skills that may change how you think about and explain your testing work. One example is Safety Language, which is a precise way of speaking that separates observation from inference. Safety Language can help testers highlight uncertainty to trigger important discussions. I’ll show you a technique I use to remove ambiguities from my own verbiage as well as helping other people remove them. This technique is especially helpful when collaborating with other Agile teams on tasks such as integration testing. We’ll use group discussion, videos, exercises, and lecture in an attempt to increase our command of testing language...which, in turn, may even strengthen our reputations as excellent testers.
This session targets testers but contains ideas that might be helpful to anyone working on a software development team.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Exposure to more than 20 (old and new) testing terms to help discuss testing and share knowledge.
  • Why and how to speak precisely about the difference between inference and observation.
  • Tester language heuristics that can help improve communication.
  • Awareness of personal pronoun usage and its affect on testing-related communications.
  • How Agile board column names affect team language and reduce or improve teamwork.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Eric Jacobson

Eric Jacobson

Principal Test Architect, Cardlytics
After being a software testing drone for three years, Eric Jacobson attended a Rapid Software Testing course and fell in love with the craft. He became lead tester of Turner Broadcasting’s traffic system, responsible for generating billions of dollars annually via ad placement. Eric is currently the Principal Test Architect at Atlanta-based financial tech startup, Cardlytics, where he leads testing efforts and directs development teams. He... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Piedmont

10:45am

Double the dollar; Cut the features your stakeholders want that your customers don't need (Paul Smith, Mark Ferencik)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
The Standish Group’s annual Chaos Report shows the success (meaning on time, in budget, in scope) of Agile projects at 42% with Waterfall projects at just 14%. Clearly a big win for agile. However the report also shows that 50% of the software features still go unused. We end up with code which never gets used which is still being maintained at high cost.
Agile by itself is not enough. We will describe how techniques drawn from User Centered Design can help to highlight and eliminate the unused features while also building a metric driven backlog for development. These techniques will be familiar to anyone with Lean Startup - just enough detail at each stage to be successful, with early and often testing of the results.
This session will provide an overview of this user centered approach followed by a deeper dive into each stage of the process. Following this we will then:
  • Demonstrate how to use a minimal preparation task analysis method to observe users and gather metrics
  • Show how the metrics gathered can be used to help identify the highest possible value and steer stakeholders away from those features which will not be used
  • Verify back to end customers the user stories through a task map, providing a single view of all user needs
  • Show how the design can be quickly reviewed and tested at low cost and effort
  • Describe how the development team is engaged throughout to spread the understanding of where the true value lies.
This session is for anyone who wants to maximize the impact of their software delivery:
  • UX practitioners wanting to learn an approach for engaging with Agile teams
  • Developers who want to ensure their software will be used
  • Stakeholders who are struggling to articulate what should be built
  • Managers who want to maximize the impact their software teams have.
We have trained this approach to an IT department of 180 people at one of the largest pharmaceutical companies and have seen some tremendous results. These easy to learn techniques are a simple retooling of personnel and practices already in place.
We commonly hear phrases from business analysts who have gone through this process “I’ve been supporting these users for 5 years and I had no idea this was what they were actually doing.”
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand that Agile can inadvertently promote the delivery of expensive unused software
  • Learn how interviews using a task directed protocol can be used to quickly understand and quantify user needs.
  • Learn how quick sketching and low fidelity mockup techniques are used to test concepts quickly and give solid guidance for pivot decisions
  • Learn how to use the metrics gained from interviews and observations to help form a prioritized backlog with only features which have true business value
  • Understand how this approach can help cut out low/no use features and maximize return on investment by focusing the team on the highest value aspects.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mark Ferencik

Mark Ferencik

Product Owner/UX Designer, McKesson Specialty Health
For over 14 years I have been slugging it out in IT to make sure users and good design are at the forefront of how development projects are approached. | I bridge a gap between user experience design, usability research and Agile development practices. First and foremost I am a designer at heart with over 20 years of experience with digital solution design ranging from 3D action games to one of the largest vaccines ecommerce systems in... Read More →
avatar for Paul Smith

Paul Smith

I've been leading the change to Agile in a risk averse pharmaceutical company for over three years, acting a both coach and practitioner. My highest satisfaction is seeing the "lightbulb" moment in teams and see them internalize the process for themselves.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Baker

10:45am

Value mapping with fewer dollars and more sense (Natalie Warnert)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Prioritization of work is hard across all levels of the organization. When we focus on feature value, often the first indicator of value is dollars versus effort expended. But what about value that is not realized through dollars? Our customers do not only think in dollars.
By expanding the definition of what value can truly mean, we can normalize, rationalize, and quantify value in new and different ways that make sense to all of our customers. We can assess value across programs as well as engage team members and stakeholders through interactive activities. In a way, it’s like relative sizing to drive values that appeal to many different consumers of your product.
Natalie first demonstrates traditional value estimation (dollars) and the resulting feature map/prioritization. Then, we look at other types of value realization through a team or program level activity using common customer sense. The activity provides participants with hands-on experience estimating and mapping feature value sans dollars on a level playing field. This gives Product Owners and teams a better baseline to align enterprise and program roadmaps with their own team or product priorities - and most importantly what the customer actually values - dollars aside!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understanding of customer value realization through more than just revenue
  • Planning capacity across teams to realize values important to the company, product, and customers
  • Collaboration among dependent teams to share delivered value items
  • Facilitating a successful session with a justifiable program roadmap outcome
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Natalie Warnert

Natalie Warnert

Agile Transformation Coach, Salesforce.com
Talk to me about Women In Agile, Metrics, Agile UX, value mapping and Agile in large retail and sales organizations. | | Also check out the #WomenInAgile session on Sunday July 24 prior to the conference and register to attend! Be the change you want to see! https://t.co/A9rekeyuyl


Wednesday July 27, 2016 10:45am - 12:00pm
Fairlie

11:30am

Practicing Agility in Human Resources (Jeff Howey)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Have you ever wished "the business" teams would practice Agile as much as "technology" teams? Be careful what you ask for! It's not as easy, in practice, as it sounds in theory.
What began as a discussion to scale Agile across several Technology teams supporting the HR Business unit of a Fortune 500 Financial Services company quickly shed light on the need for active participation from the HR Business unit. As the HR organization worked to assess their readiness and discuss potential systems of delivery that would suit their needs, the leadership team agreed the same concepts of Agile could help them better manage demand in the operations of their HR Business units - from recruiting and employee communications to payroll and compensation management. What I learned is this: it's not as straightforward as one would think given the mixed nature of a business team trying to "just do their jobs" at the same time as "moving strategy forward" in an environment where most team members are truly specialists with specific job duties and spans of control, not so much a team of generalists working to deliver a unified service.
Through this experience report, I will explore:
  • The concepts and ideas that were important to the leadership team of the HR Business units as drivers for them to adopt Agility across more than just Technology
  • How the decision to include business operations teams shaped the structure and governance approach of the organization as a means of scaling Agile
  • What practices and behaviors adopted by the HR Business units were similar to those used by the IT teams, where they differed, and why
  • How the teams personalized the use of visual management tools to bring visibility to their work without feeling micro-managed in daily activities and where some teams abandoned the practice for varying reasons
  • How a "department" of HR Specialists was able to continue their specific job duties and begin to employ the concept of "team" working on a defined set of shared goals
  • Where the expectations of the leadership team hoped to build a culture of decentralized and empowered decision-making only to find a mix of delight and disappointment in the result
  • The challenges and temptations the team continues to face and how they present opportunities for the team to further adapt - or potentially fail, if unwilling to continue making needed improvements
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Many reasons to adopt Agile in Technology also apply to managing a business unit's operations.
  • Common frameworks for scaling Agile practices don't always fit perfectly when trying to scale beyond technology initiatives and require some ingenuity to build a useful structure and governance approach.
  • In a business operations setting, Kanban makes sense to manage flow but can feel uncoordinated in some cases or micro-managing in other cases - finding balance for these teams required a blend of some Scrum ceremonies with the Kanban approach to feel comfortable. In fact, some "best practices" of Scrum for technology teams seem to make life more difficult for business operations teams.
  • While many team members expect a cultural transformation in parallel to the new practices of Agile, it is normal for the cultural change to follow Agile practices and behaviors, not lead it - in fact, some Agile-at-Scale practices seem to contraindicate cultural goals - at least in the early stages of a transformation initiative.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Howey

Jeff Howey

Agile Transformation Consultant, LeadingAgile
I enjoy transforming how an organization does business by helping them think differently about how they define strategy, prioritize work, trust people to do their jobs and align the delivery system to the capabilities the organization provides. In addition to changing how people do their work, I greatly enjoy changing how people work together.



Wednesday July 27, 2016 11:30am - 12:00pm
Kennesaw

1:30pm

Open Jam Daily Huddle
Want to delve deeper into a session you went to? Have an edgy or groundbreaking topic to share? Got some questions you want to discuss? Then you want to come to Open Jam, where folks gather to introduce thoughts and take away ideas while building off of one another's creativity.

Anyone may convene an Open Jam session. They are short sessions that run throughout the day, from early in the morning, like Lean Coffee, and sometimes late into the evening! All you need to lead a session is passion and commitment. We encourage interactive sessions providing opportunities to explore ideas and techniques. Sessions don't need to be formal, in fact, sometimes it's more fun if they are not!

So come to the Open Jam to choose a time slot for your session, then announce it to fellow conference participants so they can join!

Wednesday July 27, 2016 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Grand Hall Foyer

2:00pm

Beyond Portfolio: The agile transformation of a multinational financial institution (Jordi Falguera)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
This case study covers our experiences executing the Digital Transformation of a large financial institution across eight countries and three continents.
In the experience report, we'll outline the specific problems that Strategists, Change Agents, and Agilists encounter when attempting to do a transformation of this scale.
We will talk about:
  • How we targeted a small portfolio to achieve a successful first pilot and how we leveraged it to generate interest from other groups within the organization.
  • How we articulated a standard global strategy that included several portfolios across different countries.
  • How and when we engaged with departments outside product development: Engineering, Marketing, Digital Sales, Business Development, Talent and Culture, etc.
  • How we went multinational but kept the relationship with the major stakeholders to avoid engaging at the team level only.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Executing a Transformation at this scale presents unique challenges, amongst them:
  • We used SAFe as our reference model but soon realized that even that framework didn't have the tools required to handle a global portfolio. As a result, we had to develop a strategy with the COO of the group and distil it down to Portfolio, Program, and teams.
  • We thought it all had to do with implementing Lean and Agile practices in the IT group. Soon we realized that we have to reach deeper into the organization to work with other groups that had an impact on the success of the transformation. This included the Talent and Culture group and their policies around bonuses and career plans for the recently appointed ScMs and POs.
  • Even though the organization is committed to the agile transformation across all groups, we still had to develop a transformation roadmap that accounted for the fact that several core groups will continue to use traditional methodologies in the mid to long term.
  • One of the hardest parts of the transformation is to get buy-in from many support functions so that they are willing to develop new processes and approaches that support lean and agile practices across the enterprise.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Jordi Falguera

Jordi Falguera

Agile Practice Director, UST Global



Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Kennesaw

2:00pm

Introduction to Agile Product Innovation (Rich Mironov)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Innovation is a complicated topic. Product folks often focus the discussion externally: how do we build products that customers and buyers find more innovative? ...attract more users, out-design the competition, create strategic advantage? Process folks often focus the discussion internally: how do we boost quality and delivery speed? ...better understand the true needs and ROI models of our users? ...create more joy for our teams?
In this session, we will suggest a few different definitions or metrics for innovation. Then we will unpack several approaches to innovation: team-level improvements through retrospectives and incremental process changes; innovation iterations to rethink delivery routines; lean UX approaches to mapping customer problems; market experiments/customer development to validate early product concepts; revenue and market share as proxies for innovation. We'll also explode a few popular myths about products we love (e.g. iPod). We may discover that each attendee has a different slant on innovation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • What are different definitions of innovation? How might we measure it?
  • Compare market-facing product innovation with internal-facing process innovation
  • See a few different approaches to boosting innovation
  • Danger of hindsight and selective memory as innovation exemplars
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Rich Mironov

Rich Mironov

CEO, Mironov Consulting
Rich Mironov coaches product executives, product management teams and agile development organizations. He is a seasoned tech executive and serial entrepreneur: the product guy at six start-ups including as CEO and VP Products/Marketing. With deep technical roots in B2B infrastructure, SaaS and consumer online, Rich combines what-we-can-build with what-markets-will-pay-for. Rich has been relentlessly Doing, blogging, speaking, teaching and... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover AB

2:00pm

Systems Outside of Time - Première Partie (Jessica Kerr)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Special relativity tells us that when information takes time to travel, there is no universal forward march of time. Every system today has significant, unpredictable information delay. Distributed systems theory gives us ways of imposing a global ordering -- but what if we didn't? What if we said, "Hmm, we sold two of this item today. We only have one in stock. Let's say that the customer who paid for expedited shipping came first." Perhaps the clock is a crutch and we can climb farther without it.
With event sourcing and CQRS (Command Query Responsibility Segregation pattern), with languages like Bloom, the inklings of these systems exist. But at a framework level, they can only treat all events as equal. What if our systems played historian, and said: each customer's experience with the UI must remain true. Each report someone has viewed must remain true. All internal events -- let's do what we want with those! Write our own story, optimized for business purposes instead of aligned to a clock that is already fictional. This session explores the possible usefulness of such systems, if they existed. Come prepared to explore beyond what makes sense, and seek out what might be possible.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers

Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Spring

2:00pm

Powerful Questions Workshop for Agile Coaches (Martin Alaimo, Olaf Lewitz)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Did you ever wonder why some executives and organizations seem to make a lot of progress with some coaches and not with other ones? Of course, there are many factors. And between the most important things is the Coach's ability to make powerful questions.
Powerful Questions are the kind of questions that Invite your clients to a new dimension of clarity, action and discovery. These kind of questions are provocative. They disarm your clients evasion mechanisms and put a halt to their confusion.
On the other side, the non-Powerful Questions, are.. well... just useless questions.
What kind of questions would you like to describe you as an Agile Coach?
Come to this Powerful Questions Workshop for Agile Coaches and get your practice redesigned, let your client get the most of you and never, ever, forget about it.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify what makes questions useless or powerful
  • Be able to turn useless questions into powerful ones
  • Learn the different purposes of different kind of questions
  • Be able to turn the Agile Coach practice into a challenging and eye-opening practice for your clients
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Martin Alaimo

Martin Alaimo

Agile Coach & Trainer, Founder, Kleer
I work as Organizational Coach and professional trainer. As a Certified Scrum Coach (CSC) and Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), my main area of intervention is team work under a collaborative and relational environment within the scope of technological products development. My main concern today is about helping other areas, beyond the technology one, to perceive and capitalize the benefits of this new working proposal, emphasising interpersonal... Read More →
avatar for Olaf Lewitz

Olaf Lewitz

Trust Artist, trustartist.com
Witch, Nomad, Pioneer.Trust Artist. Connecting with people to enable them to increase trust, in themselves and others.Will stay when needed and leave when wanted.Loving and challenging.Using Scrum, Kanban, CoreProtocols, NVC, agile or better.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency VII

2:00pm

The Product Owner's Universe (Luke Lackrone, Merland Halisky)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Product Owners are vital to a great agile team. They cast a vision, set a direction, and bring clarity. We look to them for answers, but how do they have those answers? Through the relationships they build.
In this workshop, we explore Product Owners in their own universe: who do they relate to, what do they need from others, and what do others need from them. What gravity pulls them, and those around them. You will be moving around, meeting your fellow attenders, looking inward, and relating your experiences in order to create this picture of the product owner's universe.
This session is primarily for product owners looking to explore their role and build empathy for other project members, as well as coaches looking for ideas on growing stronger product owners.
Learning Outcomes:
  • 1. Key relationships for product owners
  • 2. Expectations for and from product owners
  • 3. How to have empathy for the other roles in an agile project
  • 4. A new workshop for coaching product owners in their role
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Merland Halisky

Merland Halisky

Agile Coach & Trainer, Booz Allen Hamilton
Currently facilitates ICAgile training courses for Booz Allen and client teams. | Created and presented seminars on Kanban and Scrumban. | Overly enthusiastic about the importance and lack of respect of the Agile Value Team & Product Owner role. | Delivered presentations for many years regarding geospatial technologies including delivering a keynote address at the GIS Brasil Conference in 2001,
avatar for Luke Lackrone

Luke Lackrone

Agile Coaching Lead, Booz Allen Hamilton
Luke is the Agile Coaching Lead at Booz Allen Hamilton, in the DC Metro area. Luke has been building software solutions for defense and intelligence customers for over 10 years, leading teams of 3 to 43. Luke has found agile values and coaching techniques to be a powerful frame for being more human at work, and making the workplace a more creative, unifying, and rewarding space. Luke's certifications include PMP, PMI-ACP, ICP-ATF, ICP-ACC, SPC.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Dunwoody

2:00pm

Reinventing culture as your team changes (Csaba Patkós)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
I believe there is an amazing journey when you grow up as part of a junior team. Having the opportunity to influence the actions that will lead to the definition of your development processes will be a really memorable experience. This experience will continue as your processes morph into your culture. And when your team has a solid culture, every member feels limitless, empowered, and productive. It is magical… until new members arrive.
While we were growing up as a team, we faced two interesting challenges. How to integrate new members into our evolving team so that we can define our culture together? How to board new members into our team after we reached an established culture?
Let's analyze the failures and successes of our team. Then, find answers to all these questions. At each point in a team’s evolution there are specific type of processes and methods. These processes evolve with the team. They are formal and visible at the beginning. With time they turn into simple known facts. Finally they become reflexes nobody thinks about.
In this session, expect to understand what team culture means and how to break it down into teachable processes. Take what is considered common knowledge and produce documents that are easy to publish, read, and teach to new team members. Any change in a team means turbulence of performance and culture. You want new members to learn your ways fast and best, so they can contribute real value to the next iteration of your team culture.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Understand what team culture means from different perspectives.
  • Discover a relation between psychology, sociology, business, and culture.
  • How to face the challenges of continuous cultural growth while adding new members to your team.
  • What to do when you have to teach your culture to new team members.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Csaba Patkós

Csaba Patkós

Software Engineering Team Lead, Syneto
Really good technology must help us from our grumpy morning wakeup until we fell asleep at night. This is why I go to work every day. By being the lead software developer at Syneto I contribute to the building of the next generation storage devices, and hopefully a technologically better World. I fulfill my professional dream by writing software, managing teams, leading and mentoring others, and sharing my vision through conferences like this.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency VI

2:00pm

Living on the Edge (Service): Bundling Microservices to Optimize for Devices (Mark Heckler)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Devices (phones, tablets, etc.) already consume most services/data, but they have to get those services somewhere! In this session, learn how to use proven patterns & open source software to quickly and effectively build edge services - API gateways - that marshal & streamline communication between your key services and end-users with devices in hand. This session addresses vital points such as:
  • Leveraging OAuth2 for service security
  • Configuration services
  • Microservice registration and discovery
  • Circuit breakers for graceful degradation
Additional topics discussed include logging & tracing, testing approaches, and migration patterns.
The presenter will demonstrate how to develop & manage microservices & expose them via an edge service, securely, using OSS tools employed by Netflix to keep movies streaming globally 24x7.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn:
  • * how to quickly and effectively build edge services
  • * how to integrate edge services with existing services
  • * how to optimize for mobile devices
  • * how to leverage edge services securely
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Mark Heckler

Mark Heckler

Principal Technologist/Developer Advocate, Pivotal Software, Inc.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Fairlie

2:00pm

Systematic Code Deletion as an Agile Practice (Michael Feathers)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We keep adding code to systems. It's a truth that we don't often reflect upon. If we practice TDD and refactoring we can keep our code under control. Yet, it keeps growing. Few teams have a strong sense of whether or not an area of code is dead or moribund - yet that information is vital. When we have it, we can remove distracting code and simplify our systems in the process.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Participants will learn how to instrument code to gain production usage information. They will also learn how to make decisions based upon that information, and how to apply a series of strategies for code replacement or excision.


Speakers
MF

Michael Feathers

Director, R7K Research & Conveyance
Michael Feathers is the Founder and Director of R7K Research & Conveyance, a company specializing in software and organization design. Prior to forming R7K, Michael was the Chief Scientist of Obtiva and a consultant with Object Mentor International. Over the past 20 years he has consulted with hundreds of organizations, supporting them with general software design issues, process change and code revitalization. A frequent presenter at national... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Learning Center

2:00pm

New Rules for DevOps Radicals (Jeff Hackert)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
DevOps is a union of culture, process, and tools. This workshop is focused on developing the coaching competencies required to facilitate culture and practice change inside your organization. "New Rules for DevOps Radicals" is a bootcamp for Managers, Scrum Masters, Product Owners, and Operations and Development leads who are focused on getting their teams to the continuous delivery of high quality software.
In the workshop we will learn to work with ideas that are central to building teams capable of delivering high quality software at velocity.
Silos beget supervision, supervision begets process.
Your organization's structure is the product of its communication history.
Stop shipping your org chart!
Learning is your only competitive advantage.
Stop anticipating the outcome, seek validation instead.
Automate everything, discuss the rest.
Adopt low friction technology paths.
Meet people where they are. Have empathy for the people that do the work.
It’s not the words we use, it’s the things we do.
Create organizational events (Holy #$&! Moments) and support them with community.
Learning Outcomes:
  • History of DevOps (Agile, Lean, Continuous Delivery).
  • Learn the central concepts and principles required to build a DevOps capability within your organization.
  • Learn how Agile, Lean, and DevOps support each other.
  • Learn to understand the history of your organizations structure and culture and how to create positive and lasting change.
  • Learn to identify and break functional silos.
  • Learn to create events (micro-revolutions) that change the language and structure of your organization.
  • Develop empathy and respect for all perspectives in the change process.
  • Identify areas of waste, blockages or frustration in your DevOps practice.


Speakers
avatar for Jeff Hackert

Jeff Hackert

Director, Learning Experience, Chef Software Inc
Agile Coach to Engineering leadership and Director of Learning and Development at Chef. | Talk to me about Continuous Learning, Continuous Delivery, DevOps, Infrastructure as Code, Engineering Management, Team Development, Mindfulness, Video Games, and my new found love of Metal!


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover C

2:00pm

Beyond Lean UX: Making Enterprise Agility and Scrum more User-Centred (Matthew Hodgson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
We get the best feedback from working software over documentation, says Alistair Cockburn when commenting recently on the Agile Manifesto. And while some look at enterprise use of Lean UX to make us more customer focussed with feedback loops, what can we do instead to make Scrum at scale more user-centred? How can we better leverage its powerful P-D-C-A learning loops at scale as an integral part of continuous delivery?
Come and listen about a meta framework that combines Lean UX, user-centred design and Design Thinking to empower Scrum teams at scale to:
  • Be more user-centred by leveraging both user-experience (UX) and customer experience (CX) methods
  • Identify and dissuade Lean UX anti-patterns from creating waste
  • Collaboratively build team knowledge about users' context, triggers in a way that creates software fit for fast feedback over throw away artefacts
  • Share and build patterns between teams to expedite delivery and data collection to verify investment hypotheses through program layers
  • Leverage SAFe's centralisation vs decentralisation paradigm so economically sensible decisions about investment are made at the appropriate level
  • Empower executives to make informed investment decisions about their products with data and feedback from their Scrum teams
Learning Outcomes:
  • The difference between UX and CX
  • What happens when you teach Scrum teams about CX, UX and make them user-centred in their focus
  • Using Lean UX as a backlog refinement learning pattern
  • Integration of Lean UX patterns across portfolio, program and team decision layers
  • Identifying Lean UX anti-patterns and treating them


Speakers
avatar for Matthew Hodgson

Matthew Hodgson

Lead Partner for Enterprise Agile Transformation, Zen Ex Machina
Matthew has been using psychology to further ICT cultural change goals for 20 years. He is a contributing author to the books 'The Emergence of the Relationship Economy' and 'The Psychology of Aid' and continues to publish in international journals in the fields of psychology on the pragmatic aspects of learning, change, teamwork and motivation. | | As an agile coach, Matthew applies techniques from his background in psych and 20 years of... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Courtland

2:00pm

Can we do that here? Implementing Devops at the speed of government (Joshua Seckel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Government is often known for large formal gate reviews before anything is allowed to deploy to production. Often with multiple stakeholders holding sway over different parts of the deployment approval with the result of a time consuming process to get functionality to users. DevOps is premised on fast deployment to production to deliver functionality into the users hands and getting quick feedback from all interested parties (operations, users, stakeholders, etc). This implementation of Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery, and other practices within the government sector can be daunting. Providing the teams themselves the authority to deploy code to production to speed the process would seem to be anathema.
This talk will show practices and policies to allow teams to deploy to production in a governement environment while maintaining the required oversight, auditability, and compliance required for these applications.
Learning Outcomes:
  • At least one option for team deployment to production in a government environment
  • How to maintain compliance at the team level
  • Configuration Management and Release Management practices that work for these deployments
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Seckel

Joshua Seckel

Chief of Applied Technology Division, USCIS
I lead the Applied Technology Division at US Citizenship and Immigration Services. That division includes architecture, independent test, quality assurance, change and release management, strategic vendor management, and agile coaches helping to transform USCIS to deliver better value to business faster.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Lenox

2:00pm

Building Blocks of a Knowledge Work Culture (Doc Norton)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Much of what we've learned about management and motivation isn't necessarily wrong, it's just inappropriate and ineffective for knowledge work. From hierarchies to bonuses for hitting goals, how we're structured, what we expect from leaders, and how we motivate individuals are by-products and lessons learned in a simpler time when most of our work required less thought and more physical endurance. Tackling today's complex problems means new organizational structures and new approaches to how we work. To create a truly impactful knowledge work environment, you need to use appropriate leadership styles and create an environment that allows people to achieve their highest potential. Doc takes a look at types of work, the management styles that work best for them, and the qualities necessary to create a high-performing knowledge work culture. Building off of Daniel Pink's work on Individual performance and motivation for cognitive work, Doc explores team performance and motivation.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Overview of types of work and their appropriate management styles
  • What motivates individuals in creative/knowledge work
  • What motivates teams in creative/knowledge work
  • The building blocks of a knowledge work culture


Speakers
avatar for Doc Norton

Doc Norton

CEO, CTO2
Doc is passionate about working with teams to improve delivery and building great organizations. Once a dedicated code slinger, Doc has turned his energy toward helping teams, departments, and companies work better together in the pursuit of better software. Working with a wide range of companies such as Groupon, Nationwide Insurance, Belly, and many others, Doc has applied tenants of agile, lean, systems thinking, and servant leadership to... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Centennial 4

2:00pm

Improving Performance Reviews and Feedback Discussions with Conversation Modeling (Jason Tice)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Are you interested in learning a fun technique to improve performance reviews and feedback discussions so they better support agile values? If so, we hope you will accept our invitation to experience conversation modeling at Agile2016. In this hands-on workshop, you will work in pairs to build and discuss simple models that demonstrate how you can improve and grow. You will experience how modeling performance review conversations allows you to better explain your goals, and as a result, your colleagues are able to provide better feedback and advocacy to support your improvement. This workshop will prepare you to use conversation modeling following Agile2016 and as we practice the technique you will receive advice and insights for your improvement from other Agile2016 attendees.
Learning Outcomes:
  • An understanding of how traditional manager led performance reviews can challenge successful adoption of agile methods
  • How conversation modeling stimulates more effective discussion through greater focus on metaphor and asking metaphor-based questions to enable better learning and feedback
  • Recommended discussion and debriefing prompts to use in conversation modeling activities
  • Guidance on how to safely introduce conversation modeling to your team, manager or organization
Attachments:

Speakers
JT

Jason Tice

Vice President of Business Innovation, World Wide Technology


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Regency V

2:00pm

Intentional Learning - Map a Successful Strategy (JoEllen Carter, Claire Moss)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
As agile team members, we are committed to learning. However, often our learning is opportunistic and unplanned: we chase the latest shiny thing and gain broad but shallow knowledge. In a workshop inspired by Dan North and Chris Matt's work in skills mapping, you will chart your own learning adventure based on where you are now and where you want to be in the future.
This workshop will have 5 parts:
1. Intro - Overview of current learning landscape. Outside of a degree or certification program, learning requires individual planning and a tiny bit of discipline. I'll present an outline of the technique we'll follow for this workshop and highlight results from applying this technique with 2 different teams.
2. Skills Mapping and Self-Evaluation. Attendees will self-evaluate their skills in two realms - skills needed by their teams and skills they'd like for their own professional advancement (a little 2008 but essential to set the stage for the remaining 2 parts). The presenters will provide some sample skills list for different agile roles as a starting point.
3. Learning / Mastery Objectives. Attendees will review some example skills maps, then analyze their skills map and choose which skills they would like to augment or acquire and what level of mastery they would like to achieve
4. Map your strategy. There are many different ways to approach learning. However, being intentional about what you learn and how you approach it means you increase your odds of success. I'll briefly highlight the latest research in learning styles and today's popular methods. Attendees will identify concrete next steps to take on their individual learning adventure, with the table group contributing ideas and experience.
5. Wrap up
Learning Outcomes:
  • Identify skills desired for your personal professional benefit.
  • Identify skills that are important to your team's success.
  • Select target skills and determine desired mastery levels.
  • Select learning activities to begin progress towards desired mastery level.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for JoEllen Carter

JoEllen Carter

Lead QA Engineer, Olo, Inc.
avatar for Claire Moss

Claire Moss

Agile Tester, VersionOne
Software testing speaker, workshop facilitator, author, and blogger. Agile software tester working closely with product development team. I help teams to craft more testable user stories. Testing teacher, unit and integration test review and advisement, exploratory testing coach. Exploratory tester and test automator. | Claire Moss has always had a passion for writing, which might be a strange trait for a discrete mathematician, but that... Read More →



Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover DE

2:00pm

Servant *Learner*ship: Exploring Teacher, Student & Community to grow better Agile Coaches (Lyssa Adkins, Timothy Meyers)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
What is the difference between decent trainings and a series of profound, life-trajectory-altering experiences?
We’ve all attended good trainings where we’ve picked up a few useful new tools to add to our tool box. That’s alright, but how can you create a learning relationship that flourishes for years? And advances the craft? We have experienced one such way and want to share it with you.
We (Tim and Lyssa) explore the growth pattern that Tim has gone through to become a demonstrably skilled Agile Coach, from ScrumMaster for one team to champion of an internal agile coaching capability that impacts over 70 project teams, 30 clients, and more than 1800 lives. On this journey, we have been part of an intense learning and competency-building program, and we learned a lot about learning. We learned how to construct experiences that measurably grow skills. We discovered what we are calling Servant *Learner*ship, where the roles of teacher and student are fluid in service of not only growing individual’s skills, but also deepening the discipline.
And, we believe this growth pattern can be adapted for other agile disciplines. Come discover how you can apply it to create deeper skill within yourself, and among more people in your area of agile expertise.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Learn a known pattern for sowing and cultivating a lasting learning relationship that advance a given field.
  • Learn about the components of a competence-building learning experience.
  • Learn what Servant Learnership is and explore how it may apply in your own context.
  • Consider your “learning lineage” and whether it has put you on strong enough foundation to support your further development.
  • Reflect on whether the development path you are on will offer you the type of shift or learning you are after.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Coach of Agile Coaches, Agile Coaching Institute
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective needed to guide teams and Agile leaders to harness Agile as the competitive advantage weapon it was meant to be. I know the transformation path is rocky. As a... Read More →
avatar for Timothy Meyers

Timothy Meyers

Founder, Agile Coaching, Booz Allen Hamilton


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Centennial 1

2:00pm

Building a Fast, Flexible Flow Using SAFe 4.0 Lean Agile Portfolio Management (Jean Dahl)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Portfolio Management is not a new discipline. However, since the introduction of SAFe in 2012, it’s moved into the mainstream and the importance of structured Portfolio Management has become increasingly more important within the Lean Agile community. But why has this shift occurred? It’s a direct result of today’s business climate, because companies need to ensure they are working on the right stuff at the right time to seize competitive advantage through speed to market by harnessing the power of Lean Agile Development practices. The ability to innovate, and be innovative to create a fast, flexible flow from concept to cash is no longer a nice ability to have… it is a must for corporate survival. In this session, we will discuss how the SAFe 4.0 components at the Portfolio and Value Stream levels come together in a cohesive manner to ensure your organization harnesses the innovation, speed, and agility necessary to survive and thrive in the coming years!
Learning Outcomes:
  • Be able to differentiate between the different types of portfolios
  • Identify how value streams play a key role in structuring your portfolios
  • Determine how to create Fast, flexible flow using Lean Agile methods
  • Recognize the major components of Portfolio Management
  • Comprehend the entire Portfolio Management Lifecycle


Speakers
avatar for Jean Dahl

Jean Dahl

VP-Global Portfolio Delivery, LexisNexis
An innovative enterprise Lean Agile leader and creative change agent, Jean specializes in bringing together the people, process, and technology aspects necessary to succeed at the portfolio, program, and team levels to accomplish Agile @ Scale within organizations seeking to embrace Agility. She combines just the right amount of both practical and theoretical knowledge obtained over a 20+ year career within both corporate and consulting roles, to... Read More →



Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hanover FG

2:00pm

Waiting for Godot: Concrete approaches to busting delays & why your enterprise should care (Adam Yuret)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Nobody likes waiting the glacially slow two-minutes it takes to microwave their lunch. Imagine how our customers feel waiting years for products only to discover the product doesn't actually solve their problem anymore. Or, worse yet, it solves a problem they needed solved years ago.
According to David J Anderson or Troy Magennis, queues, handoffs and wait times represent at least 85% of delays in getting our product to markets. In this talk I'll share concrete approaches to busing those delays. We'll discuss common sources of delay and approaches to reducing or eliminating them using data-driven approaches such as Theory of Constraints and Systems Thinking.
Agile is about shortening learning cycles by reducing the time we waste on non-essential activities such as doing work that doesn't create meaningful product, wasting energy on overly elaborate requirements documents that are outdated the minute they're created and working as individuals instead of high-performing teams.
Come learn how to use Eli Goldratt’s Theory of Constraints to significantly reduce or eliminate huge delays in your value streams. We want to deliver value to our customers quickly in order to get critical feedback from them on how to evolve the next iteration of our products.
While the customer waits, we're not learning from them. Let’s solve that problem together using Theory of Constraints and systems thinking.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will learn:
  • What delays value from flowing through our systems (with some data and some anecdotal evidence)
  • Why delays are the single greatest impediment to our ability to deliver value to our customers.
  • How to identify and address bottlenecks within a system.
  • The basics of Goldratt's Theory of Constraints (TOC) and why those principles and approaches are powerful.
  • How TOC relates to complexity thinking (Cynefin) and using both amplifies their effectiveness at solving problems with managing your portfolio and programs.
  • Introduction to Systems Thinking and how to manage the interconnected relationships within out organization effectively.
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Adam Yuret

Adam Yuret

Founder/Consultant, Context Driven Agility
Adam Yuret is an experienced systems thinker who has consulted small non-profits and fortune 100 clients on adopting context-driven systems to solving difficult problems. Adam started Context Driven Agility in 2010 to share his passion for humanistic flow-based systems full time. He’s been consulting organizations and teams to adapt to their respective contexts using collaborative approaches and lean principles to great effect. Context Driven... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Baker

2:00pm

Ellen Gottesdiener's Stalwarts Session (Ellen Gottesdiener)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
**
Learning Outcomes:
  • **


Speakers
avatar for Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener

CEO/Founder, EBG Consulting
Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the convergence of agile + requirements + product management and a pioneer in the use of collaborative practices for product discovery. She offers techniques, tools, training, and leadership in how you can engage in ways that excite, invite, and produce valuable product outcomes and happy teams. | | Ellen is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and presenter. Her most recent book... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Inman

2:00pm

The Fast Foundation Workshop: Setting Up Projects for Success (Jeremy Kriegel)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Once upon a time, we had ‘Discovery’, ‘Define’, and ‘Design’. These phases let us explore the problem and the audience, while conceiving a holistic solution. Now we have sprints, complete with a backlog that seems like it appears overnight and a development team that is going to build with or without design to guide it. How do we continue to create great products?
Introducing the Fast Foundation Workshop. This 3-day workshop enables you to engage your clients and stakeholders to quickly define the key elements of your product or project, aligns the team, and identifies critical risks. When it is complete, everyone has a good idea of what is going to be built as well as what it will take to get there. It has been tested with companies of all sizes, from founders looking to conceptualize their first product, to large companies redesigning existing products, as well as across verticals. Its general enough to be used in a wide variety of circumstances while specific enough to ensure that you get specific, usable results.
The Fast Foundation Workshop consists of 4 exercises, each one designed to pivot the team’s perspective on the product, while drilling down to greater levels of detail. Each stage of the Fast Foundation Workshop balances democratic content generation with collaborative consensus. You may be familiar with some of the individual exercises, but the magic is in how each is conducted and in how they fit together. The workshop starts with establishing clear goals & priorities, then moves to defining possible users of the product. Next, we shift to a task perspective, mapping the activities those user will need to accomplish to meet the goals, before visualizing key areas of the solution. When these four areas are clear, everyone involved will have a shared understanding of the vision as well as have a clear way to identify risks and mitigate them.
This workshop will introduce leaders of any kind, from product owners and scrum masters, to UX and development leads, to each of the exercises, allow you to experience a piece of it, show how they fit together, and give you some tips on how to facilitate them with your team. You will be prepared to run a Fast Foundation workshop with your own team, if you already have experience with some of the exercises, or know where you need to do additional prep, if the exercises are new to you.
Learning Outcomes:
  • - How 'define' activities have evolved
  • - Philosophy behind the workshop structure
  • - Overview of each technique
  • - Tips on how to facilitate the exercise
  • - What to do after it is over


Speakers
avatar for Jeremy Kriegel

Jeremy Kriegel

UX Manager, BzzAgent
Jeremy Kriegel has been designing great user experiences (UX) for 18 years. Just as we need to understand the needs and context of users to craft a design solution, Jeremy believes that success also requires us to look at the business context to craft an appropriate design process. From start-ups to Fortune 100 companies, as a consultant or on an internal team, he has seen a lot of different scenarios that each required their own approach. He... Read More →



Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Piedmont

2:45pm

Launching Agile and DevOps in a 100 Year Old Company (Dilip Balachandran, Michael Kovas)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Change is constant, but how do you drive change in an organization that has existed for more than 100 years and has successfully weathered many a storm? If you are a leader or change agent trying to transform an organization through the use of Agile and/or DevOps, you can learn from our experience launching agile and DevOps in a 114 year old company. We share our success stories, challenges and lessons learned so that you can learn from some of the common themes and apply the learnings to your own organization.
In this presentation we will discuss our experience around:
1. Making a case and securing executive buy-in for agile and DevOps
2. Developing an agile methodology and DevOps architecture
3. Successfully launching agile and DevOps with minimal funding
4. Building and sustaining bi-modal capabilities (NOTE: bi-modal capability represents the idea of successfully launching and using agile methodology in an organization even as it co-exists with the legacy methodology of that organization)
5. Long term roadmap and continuous improvement
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • Making the case for agile in a conservative company culture
  • Launching Agile and DevOps with minimal investment
  • Agile methodology
  • DevOps architecture
  • Key implementation challenges
  • Building a track record of success with part-time resources
  • Importance of bi-modal capabilities (NOTE: bi-modal capability represents the idea of successfully launching and using agile methodology in an organization even as it co-exists with the legacy methodology of that organization)
Attachments:

Speakers
DB

Dilip Balachandran

Sr. Manager, Agile COE and Application Development, USG
avatar for Michael Kovas

Michael Kovas

IT Manager, USG
Your transition from waterfall to Agile or Bimodal


Wednesday July 27, 2016 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Kennesaw

3:45pm

Delivering BI projects using Agile (Syed Rayhan, Gurushyam Mony)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are you wondering how you could deliver your BI project using Agile? Seeing the success of Agile in other areas of your organization, you are now encouraged, and entertaining the idea of using Agile on your next BI project . Or, your organization has decided to move to Agile enterprise wide, and you are asked to use Agile on your next BI projects. Either way, you can see how Web or mobile projects can use Agile, but you are not sure how to approach your BI project with Agile delivery. You are not alone. We were on the same boat too. We had the same struggle, and we learned by doing it on several projects.
We all know how BI projects differ from all other projects and pose unique challenges- poor data quality, lack of clear data ownership, lack of agreements on a single definition of data, foggy requirements, difficulty testing, and last, but not least, the constant push and pull between immediate needs vs. changing business environments. Waterfall seems to be the only way to manage those challenges.
In this talk/paper, we want to share our experiences with you. We'll broadly divide our learning into three phases. In each phase, we will share things that went well and things that needed improvements as we progressed through each sprint from 1 to 177. We will provide you with some of our patterns for success, and strategies that we successfully used so that you can easily apply them as appropriate on your Agile BI project.
Our hope is that our experiences will encourage you to use Agile on your next BI and enjoy similar successes that you see from Web and Mobile projects.
Lessons Learned from Your Experience:
  • 1. Do not chase "Single truth" of data
  • 2. Accept that Data model will never be final
  • 3. Be comfortable with incremental and ongoing data loads throughout the project
  • 4. Be comfortable with the reality that changes to requirements will impact many things
  • 5. Focus on usage of data than the data itself
  • 6. Focus on priority, not dependencies
  • 7. Work backward from metric/report to source
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Gurushyam Mony

Gurushyam Mony

IT Quality Management Architect and Manager, Department of Tax



Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Kennesaw

3:45pm

Systems Outside of Time - Deuxième Partie (Jessica Kerr)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
Special relativity tells us that when information takes time to travel, there is no universal forward march of time. Every system today has significant, unpredictable information delay. Distributed systems theory gives us ways of imposing a global ordering -- but what if we didn't? What if we said, "Hmm, we sold two of this item today. We only have one in stock. Let's say that the customer who paid for expedited shipping came first." Perhaps the clock is a crutch and we can climb farther without it.
With event sourcing and CQRS (Command Query Responsibility Segregation pattern), with languages like Bloom, the inklings of these systems exist. But at a framework level, they can only treat all events as equal. What if our systems played historian, and said: each customer's experience with the UI must remain true. Each report someone has viewed must remain true. All internal events -- let's do what we want with those! Write our own story, optimized for business purposes instead of aligned to a clock that is already fictional. This session explores the possible usefulness of such systems, if they existed. Come prepared to explore beyond what makes sense, and seek out what might be possible.
Learning Outcomes:
  • N/A


Speakers

Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Spring

3:45pm

The Manager Role for Enterprise Agility - this is what Good looks like (Russ Lewis)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
If you follow Scrum, XP, or the scaled versions of the same, it’s difficult to see the point of managers in an agile workplace.
Teams get the resources and knowledge they need to self-organise and get the job done, so surely an agile team needs “middle managers” to tell them how to do their work even less than they need project managers to tell them what work to do.
So it might be a surprise that “middle managers” are vital to a successful agile transformation in all but the smallest of organisations.
Even more surprising, is that many of the management models that have been taught for the past 40 years are actually built on principles similar to Agile's. Where those models have been effective, it has been with leaders who embedd what we would now recognise as an agile culture, with agile values and practices.
Only by coaching leaders, managers and team members in both good agile and good management, can we truly accelerate the transformation of organisations along the path of enterprise agility.
In this session, Russ, "The Agiliser" Lewis, shares the top 10 "Good Practices" he's encountered in medium and large-sized enterprises.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Management as a service - what teams really want from their managers and what senior managers expect of their managers
  • Trust is a management metric
  • How truly great managers "manage" in large organisations
  • How to use influence instead of authority to meet the objectives of more people and projects
  • 10 practices coaches (and managers) can take-away and start using next week
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for Russ Lewis

Russ Lewis

Agiliser, Storm Consulting
My job is to help you succeed


Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover DE

3:45pm

Build Strong Teams through Trust & Alignment (David Hawks, Doc List)
Limited Capacity seats available

Abstract:
One of the key aspects of high performing Agile teams is trust. Trust is hard to define, and sometimes hard to earn and to give.
In this session, as a group we explore common team dysfunctions, such as lack of trust and alignment. You will learn a number of techniques for coaching teams such as journeylines, personal maps and market of skills. After exploring and learning, you will conduct two exercises in groups: Moving Motivators, and a Team Values Exercise. These tools help teams work through conflict and change, and are valuable tools in your toolbox. These exercises also empower you to create and commit to an action plan that strengthens your team through trust and alignment.
Learning Outcomes:
  • List three or more common team dysfunctions
  • Identify five techniques for building team trust
  • Feel comfortable facilitating a “team trust and alignment” exercise
Attachments:

Speakers
avatar for David Hawks

David Hawks

CEO, Agile Velocity
David Hawks is a Certified Scrum Coach and Certified Scrum Trainer who has played almost every role in product development: developer, architect, ScrumMaster, manager, Product Owner, and executive. He has a background of building highly productive Agile teams and a passion for helping others achieve similar success. David speaks frequently at conferences and local user meet-ups. As CEO of Agile Velocity, David brings his broad experience... Read More →
avatar for Doc List

Doc List

Senior Director, Training, Agile Velocity LLC
It's all about the people. Practices and methods and frameworks and... all of that is in service to enabling and supporting people in working effectively and working together.


Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Regency VII

3:45pm

The Toyota Kata - Retrospectives with a Purpose (Inger Dickson)
Limited Capacity full

Abstract:
Are your retros starting to feel tired? Is nothing really changing? Are you curious about an approach that you might want to add to your toolbox?
We all have likely seen that “you get what you measure”. Our experience has also shown that you improve what you practice. The Toyota Kata is an approach to cultural change that brings these ideas together.
Come hear about the Toyota Kata, how we used it to help shift the culture of an entire department, and how and when to implement it in yours.
In this session, we will:
  • Cover the basics - What is it? Why do it?
  • Talk through an example - How has it worked in a practical example of cultural change?
  • Work through an experiment - How might you structure a kata in your organization?
  • Get a kit
Learning Outcomes:
  • An improved understanding of the Toyota Kata, its role in culture change, and how to use it.
  • The kit walks through the structure piece by piece to:
  • - Create your own experimental starting points
  • - Evaluate what change would make the most impact
  • - Analyze how to proceed
  • - Get equipped to apply the new understanding when you return to your teams


Speakers
avatar for Inger Dickson

Inger Dickson

Lead BA, ThoughtWorks



Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Hanover C

3:45pm

Irresistible APIs (Kirsten Hunter)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
When creating a new REST platform, the planning process frequently gets skipped (or is misunderstood) resulting in an ill-conceived API. I’ll walk you through the steps needed to create an API that developers love, and point out the common traps to avoid.
The presentation will cover creating user stories, deciding on metrics, planning the API, design decisions, documentation and developer support. I will focus on creating a developer experience that will delight and amaze your developer partners and increase engagement with your platform. This talk will focus on higher level choices rather than HTTP architecture, and is appropriate for developers, product managers, or anyone else with an interest in achieving success for their API program.
The Open API Ecosystem is an amazing opportunity for companies to partner with developers, but you really only get one chance to impress, so come learn how to make your company’s API an “A List” destination.
Learning Outcomes:
  • Attendees will come away with an understanding of a process to make a first-class successful API


Speakers
avatar for Kirsten Hunter

Kirsten Hunter

API Evangelist, Akamai Technologies, Inc.
Kirsten Hunter is an unapologetic hacker and passionate advocate for the development community. Her technical interests range from graph databases to cloud services, and her experience supporting and evangelizing REST APIs has given her a unique perspective on developer success. In her copious free time she's a gamer, fantasy reader, and all around rabble-rouser. Code samples, recipes, and philosophical musings can be found on her blog... Read More →


Wednesday July 27, 2016 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Courtland

3:45pm

Version Control Your UI (Adam Carmi)
Limited Capacity filling up

Abstract:
Wouldn't it be awesome if you could instantly find out whether your code changes caused unintended (breaking) visual changes in other parts of your app? Or if within minutes of committing code, everyone in your team would be able to see the UI changes you've made and provide feedback without even having to access the updated application? How about being alerted immediately when a browser upgrade introduces defects in your UI? And wouldn't it be cool to have a visual change log showing you the evolution of your UI?
Automated visual testing is transforming the way modern teams develop software. In this talk you will learn what autom